Mar 052014
 
The new park boasts an organic-looking climbing structure, seen in the foreground above. The light-blue ground surface is soft rubber. To the left, beyond a fence, are rail cars on a local rail spur. Beyond the play surface is the control room for the water tank (background). Notice the three “portholes” looking into the mechanics of the pumps inside the control room. (News-Ledger photo)

The new park boasts an organic-looking climbing structure, seen in the foreground above.
The light-blue ground surface is soft rubber. To the left, beyond a fence, are rail cars on a local rail spur.
Beyond the play surface is the control room for the water tank (background). Notice the three “portholes” looking into the mechanics of the pumps inside the control room.
(News-Ledger photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — FEB 26, 2014 –

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

On Friday, the City of West Sacramento will host a double grand opening, celebrating both a neighborhood park and a water tank station in the Bridge District. The twin public facilities are located at 809 Ballpark Drive, alongside the Ironworks subdivision and close to Raley Field.

“It’s a ‘neighborhood’ park,” said recreation superintendent Andre Pichly. “It has some play structures, swing sets and a very interactive climbing structure that’s geared toward kids about age 8 to 14. The structure has a lot of ropes, aluminum and climbing ladders – it’s probably the most unique climbing structure in our park system.”

The climbing  is located over a forgiving surface made of recycled rubber.

Nearby is a smaller climbing structure for the little ones, and a couple of little “spinning cups” that kids can sit in and twirl. There’s also a lattice-covered picnic area.

The park is right next to the control building for the city water tank. The wing-roofed control building has a couple of water pumps inside. The building and the water tank are both secured from public access, but the outside wall of the pump building has an unusual amenity:

“It has a couple of portholes in it, so kids – or anyone – can look in and see the mechanics of the thing,” reported Pichly.

The new park is known as the Jerome D. Barry Park.

The new park boasts an organic-looking climbing structure, seen in the foreground above. The light-blue ground surface is soft rubber. To the left, beyond a fence, are rail cars on a local rail spur. Beyond the play surface is the control room for the water tank (background). Notice the three “portholes” looking into the mechanics of the pumps inside the control room. (News-Ledger photo)

The new park boasts an organic-looking climbing structure, seen in the foreground above.
The light-blue ground surface is soft rubber. To the left, beyond a fence, are rail cars on a local rail spur.
Beyond the play surface is the control room for the water tank (background). Notice the three “portholes” looking into the mechanics of the pumps inside the control room.
(News-Ledger photo)

Barry was an accomplished local  baseball player who pitched for professional and semi-pro teams. He was also a rower with the Riverside Boat Club. Son of a pair of Irish immigrants, he grew up in the city’s old northern Washington township and served as a local justice of the peace from 1913-1925.

The 3.2 million gallon water tank was finished about a year ago. Tanks like this one serve as a “pitcher of water” for the city, reported the City’s Drew Gidlof last year.

“As water is taken in at the river, and treated and prepared for consumers, it is disseminated to various strategic points in the city,” he told the News-Ledger in 2013. “As the residents turn on their faucets, the water comes from their designated facility.”

The new tank is meant to help meet peak demand in the Bridge District and the Washington area near the ‘ziggurat’ building.

The park takes up about 1.5 acres, and the water facility a couple more acres, according to city sources. The water tank facility was budgeted at about $5.25 million, with funds chipped in by the state, the former local redevelopment agency, and local property owners. The park was budgeted at about $545,000, funded by developer impact fees in West Sacramento.

The public is welcome to the grand opening ceremony Friday at 10 a.m. (Feb. 28).

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Steve Marschke

Steve Marschke