Public tour of the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area

Snow Geese can be seen in flying high in a rough “V” formation over the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area. Yolo Basin Foundation volunteers will lead a free public tour of the YBWA from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, December 9. / Photo by Cathy Kreitzer

Snow Geese can be seen in flying high in a rough “V” formation over the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area. Yolo Basin Foundation volunteers will lead a free public tour of the YBWA from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, December 9. / Photo by Cathy Kreitzer

Amidst the thousands of migratory waterfowl that have descended on the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area are noisy, swirling flocks of Snow Geese. The Yolo Basin Foundation invites members of the public to view these and other seasonal visitors during a docent-led tour of the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area on Saturday, December 9, from 9 a.m.-noon.

Snow Geese are medium-sized geese can be identified by their white plumage and black wingtips in flight. The darker, blue morph has a white head and throat with a grey-brown body. This rare variant may be spotted among a flock of the white birds. Snow Geese breed in large colonies on arctic tundra and mate for life. Family groups travel south together. Snow Geese have an exclusively vegetarian diet that includes a range of aquatic plants, grasses, and grains.

All interested tour participants should meet a few minutes before 9 a.m. in Parking Lot A of the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area, at the west end of the Yolo Causeway. Directions to the YBWA are also available on Yolo Basin Foundation’s website at www.yolobasin.org.

Participants should bring binoculars and water (there is no potable water on site). Docents will have spotting scopes to enhance wildlife viewing. This is a driving tour on gravel roads with several stops and short walks. For more information, call Yolo Basin Foundation at (530) 757-3780 or visit www.yolobasin.org.

Yolo Basin Foundation is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the appreciation and stewardship of wetlands and wildlife through education and innovative partnerships. The Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area is owned and managed by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

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