Category Archives: News

Big kids helping little kids

Volunteers Lily He and Jessica Ngo showed up for the ‘Reading Buddy’ program held at the library, 1212 Merkley Avenue.

Volunteers Lily He and Jessica Ngo showed up for the ‘Reading Buddy’ program held at the library, 1212 Merkley Avenue.

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — MARCH 6, 2013 —

[adrotate group=”10″] The volunteers’ mission was to listen to second-grader Abby Saechin (center) practice her reading skills.

The program runs Fridays 4-5 p.m., courtesy of the River City High School Interact Club and a local Rotary Club chapter.

For information, or to sign up a youngster, call 375-6465.

(Courtesy of Charyl Silva, West Sacramento Rotary Club)

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Weekend book sale in West Sac

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

The West Sacramento Friends of the Library invite you to their spring book sale, scheduled for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sat., March 16, and 10-3 on Sun., March 17. Hardbacks will go for $1, paperbacks 50 cents, children’s books 10-25 cents, and some items will be specially priced. It will be at the library, 1212 Merkley Avenue.

On Sunday, books are only $3 per bag. For information or to volunteer, call 375-6465 Ext. 4 or email wsfol99@yahoo.com.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

UPDATE: Feb. 27 crime sweep

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

The West Sacramento Police Department just announced an operation this morning in which about a dozen warrants were served — all but one of them in West Sacramento — after an investigation into a string of vehicle and residential burglaries in town.

Lt. David Delaini of the West Sacramento Police Department talks about a sweep done in response to a local wave in car and home burglaries (News-Ledger photo)

Lt. David Delaini of the West Sacramento Police Department talks about a sweep done in response to a local wave in car and home burglaries (News-Ledger photo)

Lieutenant David Delaini of the West Sacramento Police Department said about $20,000 in illegal drugs — including methamphetamine and marijuana — were seized, along with cash, an assault rifle and other guns.

“Any time we take guns off the street and drugs off the street, that’s a victory for us,” Delaini told a press conference at about noon today. “You can see the weapons with lights (mounted) on them and you seem some stabbing weapons,” he said, referring to a table of seized items spread out for the press.

A department press release described the operation:

“The California Department of Justice, Yolo Narcotic Enforcement Team (YONET) and The West Sacramento Police Department conducted a collaborative investigation into a burglary ring, stemming from over 80 residential burglaries and 51 vehicle burglaries from December 2012 to present.   These burglaries extended throughout the city and outlying regions.  One state arrest warrant and 12 state search warrants were executed today in an attempt to recover stolen property.”

“The investigation has resulted in 13 arrests, three assault rifles, four handguns, (several of which had been stolen), an active honey oil lab (used to create marijuana extract) , five pounds of marijuana, a quarter pound methamphetamine, ammunition, and body armor.  Additionally, three locations contained children who were removed by CPS due to their access and proximity to the firearms and drugs.  Everyone arrested will be booked into the Yolo County Jail and juvenile hall.”

“The operation in West Sacramento was named ‘Operation Red Bandits’ because the members of this burglary ring have been identified as active members of the Norteno criminal street gang,” said police.

[adrotate group=”9″]  The operation aimed for young perpetrators responsible for robberies, home burglaries, carjackings, and shootings in and around the Sacramento region.

“These gang members and associates have supported their gang life style through illegal sales of methamphetamine and marijuana, as well as stolen property,” said the police press release. “These street level gang members have been identified and range in age from 16-20 years old.”

Those arrested face charges including possession of narcotics, narcotics sales and distribution, conspiracy, property crimes (burglaries, possession of stolen property), and violent crimes against persons (such as robberies, carjackings, and firearms charges.

Guns seized in the West Sacramento-based operation -- some were stolen and at least one was an illegal assault weapon, according to WSPD. (News-Ledger photo)

Guns seized in the West Sacramento-based operation — some were stolen and at least one was an illegal assault weapon, according to WSPD. (News-Ledger photo)

Wrist-mounted slashing weapon with three blades, seized in the raids (News-Ledger photo)

Wrist-mounted slashing weapon with three blades, seized in the raids (News-Ledger photo)

Bags of marijuana, and seized cash (News-Ledger photo)

Bags of marijuana, and seized cash (News-Ledger photo)

 

 

Assistance in the operation came from the CHP, Department of Justice Task Forces (Placer SIU, MAVMIT), Davis Police Department SWAT, FBI SAFE Streets Task Force, Woodland Police Department SWAT, Yolo County Sheriff’s Department SWAT, Yolo County District Attorney’s Office and the Yolo County Gang Task Force, said local police.

West Sacramento Police Department’s Lt. DeAnna Stevens provided the News-Ledger with a list of the West Sacramento locations raided on Wednesday:
540 Arthur Dr.; 614 Andrew St.; 829 Elm St.; 300 4th St.; 430 Maple St. #120; 510 Maple St. #1; 2120 Evergreen Ave. #A; 1809 Proctor Ave.; 2131 Hickory St.; 1020 Haverhill St.; and 1705 Westwood Circle.

Also on the list was an Elk Grove address.

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

What are those gizmos? Are you on camera at local traffic intersections?

ABOVE: Optical detection camera to sense approaching vehicles (white) and optical sensor to pick up the white strobe lights of a police car or fire truck (black). Photo taken on Jefferson Blvd.

ABOVE: Optical detection camera to sense approaching vehicles (white) and optical sensor to pick up the white strobe lights of a police car or fire truck (black). Photo taken on Jefferson Blvd.

NEWS-LEDGER — MARCH 6, 2013 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

Have you ever seen those gizmos mounted on West Sacramento traffic poles, and wondered if they’re cameras? And, if so, who’s watching you?

There are at least three types of pole-mounted sensors around town at different street intersections. And Peter Hanson, an engineering assistant with the City of West Sacramento’s Public Works Department, reminds us that none of them is a “red light” camera. The city doesn’t currently have a “red light camera” program to catch red light runners.

So what, exactly, are these devices?

At the corner of Jefferson Boulevard and Stone Boulevard, near the railroad tracks, you may see a thing that looks like a hanging bulb. It’s one of several security cameras operated out of the Port of West Sacramento, which is serviced by the railroad.

“These cameras have a dual purpose,” reported Hanson. “’A,’, to observe the intersection (for security), and ‘B,’ to observe the traffic at the intersection.”

Aside from monitoring security, the camera’s view can be used by city staff to see how traffic light timing changes are affecting the flow of traffic, for example.

ABOVE: The all-seeing eye of a port ecurity camera near the railroad tracks and Jefferson Boulevard, north of Stone Boulevard (photos by Thomas Farley and the News-Ledger)

ABOVE: The all-seeing eye of a port ecurity camera near the railroad tracks and Jefferson Boulevard, north of Stone Boulevard (photos by Thomas Farley and the News-Ledger)

Another type of “camera” seen at some traffic-light controlled intersections is a long, white cylindrical device. Those are directly linked to the traffic light controls.

“Those are video detection systems,” explained Hanson. “It knows if a car is coming or not. It actually sees cars, and changes the light for them. It ‘sees’ through algorithms, and it looks at the differences in contrast” in its field of view.

Then there are the more numerous little black items mounted on many a local traffic light pole.

“That’s a detector for emergency vehicles,” said Hanson. “If you look at an emergency vehicles, you will see a light bar on the roof, and in the center, there is a white strobe light. In our city, the fire and police vehicles each have one.”

Those strobes on top of fire trucks and police cars can, when turned on, put out a pattern of white flashes – which is picked up by the traffic pole sensor, and earns a “green light” for that Code 3 emergency vehicle.

Ambulances serving the town can’t do this trick, said Hanson.

There’s at least one other smart gizmo on the street – or under it, to be precise.  An “induction loop” can be buried in the pavement to sense the magnetic presence of a car that has pulled up to a red light, signaling the traffic lights that they need to change.

[adrotate group=”7″]   But none of these gadgets does what a “red light camera” would do, said Hanson. If you find yourself entering an intersection illegally after a light has turned red, the “sensor” that gives you a ticket needs to be an actual police officer.

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  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013