Category Archives: News

City Partners With West Capitol Ave. Businesses To Curb Alcohol Abuse

Alcohol Beverage Control Sgt. Kathryn Sandberg, A & B Liquors owner Jim Nessar, and West Sacramento Police Officer Rinaldo Monterrosa discuss the T.E.A.M. program at the entrance to Nessar’s store. / Photos courtesy of City of West Sacramento

Alcohol Beverage Control Sgt. Kathryn Sandberg, A & B Liquors owner Jim Nessar, and West Sacramento Police Officer Rinaldo Monterrosa discuss the T.E.A.M. program at the entrance to Nessar’s store. / Photos courtesy of City of West Sacramento

The City of West Sacramento has launched a campaign encouraging local businesses to refuse alcohol sales to inebriated customers. The program, T.E.A.M. (Together Everyone Achieves More), is a partnership between West Sacramento Police, the West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce, and businesses with liquor-sales licenses. Its purpose is to promote cooperation and teamwork between businesses and law enforcement in reducing issues traced to careless alcohol sales and consumption.

Fifteen businesses have signed up to join the T.E.A.M. program and have received official decals to post at their entrances.

“We’re thrilled that so many businesses have joined police in this effort,” said City Manager Martin Tuttle. “Working together, the City and store owners can promote a clean and safe shopping environment built upon responsible alcohol sales.”

Through the program, West Sacramento Police visits store owners to discuss alcohol sales to apparently intoxicated people. The T.E.A.M. targets liquor stores, mini marts, grocery stores and gas stations along West Capitol Avenue frequented by a transient population.

Aside from public intoxication incidents, the issue generates additional community problems, including trespassing, littering, loitering, public nuisance and criminal assaults.

To alleviate these issues, the West Sacramento Police Department has already:

Increased police presence in the form of routine foot and vehicle patrols of properties;
Maintained regular contact and relationship-building with property owners and management;
Reviewed responsible alcohol sales with owners and managers.
In addition, the City is addressing such topics as lighting, clear and visible signage, and trash and graffiti at the store properties.

The City adds that businesses engaged in selling alcohol assume a major responsibility in preserving public safety. Selling alcohol to minors and apparently intoxicated persons can result in serious liability including criminal citation, lawsuits, liquor license suspension or revocation, and jail time.

During a six month trial run of the T.E.A.M. program with several liquor stores participating, the City recorded a 92 percent decline in alcohol intoxication within the area.

Source: City of West Sacramento online publication, CityiLights

Flood Agency Visits Southport Elementary

By Michael Dunham

On Monday October 19 the West Sac Flood Protect the City Agency held a presentation at Southport Elementary school regarding flood preparedness.

West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon, Darren Suen of the California Department of Water Resources, and Rachael Orellana from the US Army Corps of Engineering all attended the presentation to stress the importance of preparing for a major flood in the city.

Public outreach firm Crocker & Crocker has worked with the West Sac Flood protect the city agency for several years helping them organize their events to reach out to communities to warn them about the dangers of flooding in a city surrounded by levees.

Crocker & Crocker representative Justina Janas said, “We’re hoping that students and the community understand that although West Sac is protected by levees they are still surrounded by water. And even though we’re in a drought even a small rain event can back up storm drains and cause localized flooding.”

The motto of the program is to Plan, Pack, and Protect which refers to the act of communities planning for floods, packing an emergency kit, and protecting yourself with flood insurance.

Janas continued saying, “West Sacramento residents need to remember that the city is basically an island surrounded by 52 miles of levee. If there ever was a large flood, residents may need to evacuate and their home and belongings may be damaged.”

An important part of the program is to educate homeowners on the importance of flood insurance. Many people may not know that homeowners’ insurance policies don’t cover flooding and flood insurance policies take 30 days to become active.

Southport Elementary third grade student Drake Nielsen who attended the event said the most important message he learned to be prepared for a flood was, “To have a plan.”

West Sacramento Foundation All Charities Dinner drew great results for local organizations

By Monica Stark
editor@news-ledger.com

The West Sacramento Foundation hit another all-time high at this year’s annual raffle and spaghetti dinner, bringing in $70,981 to 35 West Sacramento charities. The ceremonial dinner, held on Saturday, Oct. 17 inside the gymnasium at Our Lady of Grace School on Linden Road, brought smiles and good cheer to those receiving checks and those handing them out.

The Knights of Columbus, a fraternal organization of more than 1.8 million members, showed on Saturday its dedication to its four areas of service as local members dished out plates of delicious spaghetti and salad to the hundreds of hungry community members who awaited the start of the presentation of checks.

What started off with the golf tournament in the late 1980s, netting about $30,000, this year’s West Sacramento Foundation total marks a big accomplishment. The following nonprofit organizations sold more than $5,000 worth of raffle tickets: Veterans of Foreign Wars, River City High School Music Boosters, Southport Elementary PTA, River City Rowing and Our Lady of Grace School.

Richard Stamos, commander at Bryte VFW post 949, said his nonprofit the VFW Riders Association, will be putting the money earned at this year’s raffle ($4,680) toward helping veterans, including helping with hospital bills and memorials. “One guy (a veteran) got kicked out of his house. The West Sacramento Police Department said it was inhabitable. So, we fixed it up… That was about two years ago. This is one fundraiser we do yearly.”

“It is major for us because the economy is bad and it’s hard to raise funds. We’ve been cooking breakfasts, but it’s not been easy. But, we still manage to do it. We’re mostly Vietnam vets. When got home (from war), we didn’t have anything. We told ourselves we won’t have that happen to future vets,” Stamos said.

Drawing a raffle ticket representing Bridgeway Play was the youngest child of Washington Unified School District trustee Sarah Kirby-Gonzalez, Chloe Gonzalez.

What follows is the name of the nonprofit and the total net amount it received because of this year’s raffle: Belfry: $270; Bridgeway Island PTO: $3,159; Bridgeway Play: $2,700; Foster Youth Incorporated: $1,395; Friends of the Main Drain Parkway: $1,350; Holy Cross Knights of Columbus: $1,260; Holy Cross College Preparatory: $2,862; Keystone Christian Missionary Church: $900; Leukemia and Lymphoma Society: $450; Lighthouse Charter School: $3,618; Lighthouse Covenant Church (Youth): $954; Our Lady of Grace Parish Women’s Council: $1,512; Our Lady of Grace School: $8,487; River City Boosters: $945; River City Music Boosters: $5,670; River City Interact Club: $315; River City Rowing: $6,840; Rotary Club of West Sacramento: $270; Rotary Club of West Sacramento Centennial: $1,845; Sacramento West Kiwanis: $945; Soroptomist International of West Sacramento: $549; Southport Elementary PTO, Inc.: $6,669; St. Vincent de Paul – Our Lady of Grace Parish: $1,062; Stonegate: Parent Teacher Association: $2,106; Trinity Presbyterian Church: $405; Up 4 West Sacramento: $1,179; VFW Riders Association: $4,680; West Sacramento Attack: $2,268; West Sacramento Dolphin Swim Team: $900; West Sacramento Christmas Basket Project: $270; West Sacramento Early College Prep Charter School: $1,854; West Sacramento Historical Society: $630; West Sacramento Trail Riders Association: $450; Yolo County Children’s Alliance: $702; West Sacramento Foundation: $1,510.

The Outdoors Next Door: Exploring The Yolo Bypass

By Thomas Farley

If you want to get outdoors but don’t have much time, the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area is a perfect place to go. It is essentially the entire area visible from the Yolo Causeway and its main entrance is only three miles from West Sacramento. You’ll see birds of all kinds, an unusual, intensely managed landscape, and you’ll experience a relaxing break from city pressure. The noise of Interstate 80 barely registers, and you’ll soon find yourself lost in exploration.
The bypass has three main roles.

The first and most important is flood control. To relieve pressure on Sacramento River levees in heavy rain years, the 16,700 acre bypass is allowed to flood.

The second role is to encourage wildlife and habitat. After water recedes in the bypass, or whenever the ground is dry, California’s Department of Fish and Wildlife manages the property. Rice is planted, seasonal and permanent wetlands are maintained, and grasslands are cultivated, all to increase the numbers of waterfowl and other birds.

The third role is education and recreational use. Fish and Wildlife partners with groups like The Yolo Basin Foundation to promote that end.

Heidi Satter is the Foundation’s Education Coordinator. Each year she helps to organize and conduct dozens of field trips to the Bypass for schoolchildren across our region. What better way for them to experience wildlife and wetlands so close to home?

Take the signed auto tour route to experience the many elements of the bypass. It makes a complete loop of open areas, along with interesting side roads. Bring binoculars, water, and a day pack; you may be tempted to park your car to investigate the many foot trails. Annual flooding of ponds is now occurring in preparation for waterfowl season. Located in the heart of the Great Pacific Flyway, the Yolo Bypass will soon play host to countless thousands of birds as they migrate from north to south. Dove season is currently running until Sept. 15, so certain areas may be closed. (Hunting remains an activity as it has for decades, however, this use is controlled and permitted only in specific areas.) Guided monthly tours start on Oct. 10, from 9 a.m. to noon. But you are welcome to drive the bypass roads yourself at nearly any time of year.

Going? Check the information boards posted at the site since not all areas are open at all times. Downloading a map is highly recommended. Dogs are only permitted in the bypass from the causeway to the railroad tracks. Hours are dawn to dusk year round. To get to the bypass, go west on Interstate 80, take the first exit, turn right at the stop sign, and then loop underneath the highway on East Chiles Road toward the signs. The Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area Headquarters is located 1.9 miles further down on Chile’s. It’s past Yolo Farmstand and the soccer fields at 45211 County Rd 32B. Open weekdays.