Category Archives: Politics

Artwork for Joey Lopes Park

By Thomas Farley
thomasfarley@yahoo.com

The art installation for Joey Lopes Park will be a knock-out. The City Council voted on Wednesday, Jan. 13 to accept a design from nationally known artist Michael Clapper of Denver, Colorado. He beat out over 75 submissions. There were no artist submissions from West Sacramento. Commissioners from the City of West Sacramento’s Arts, Culture & Historic Preservation Commission weighed in on the decision as well as the Yolo Arts Council, City staff, an outside artist, and a landscape architect. The artwork will cost $70,000, less than two percent of the budget to build the new park off of West Capitol.

Joey Lopes was a hometown boxer who fought in the late 1940s and throughout the 1950s. At many times he competed at the Memorial Auditorium across the river. In his early career he was selected for the 1948 U.S. Olympics boxing team. He went on to fight three times for the World Lightweight crown. A community leader in retirement, Lopes did work for the West Sacramento Sanitary District, the West Sacramento Optimist Club and the West Sacramento Babe Ruth Baseball League. It was only natural that a park be named after him, and just as naturally a fitting tribute to him in art would be constructed.

As solid as the boxer and community steward himself, the stone and steel artwork will show Lopes at the height of his powers, in profile, reaching out to deliver a punch. The metal’s rusty finish connects with his blue-collar roots, the son of a grocer, fighting his way toward the top of his sport. Where did the ideas and inspiration come from to produce such a design?

Michael Clapper says he drew on materials supplied to him by the Yolo Arts Council and the West Sacramento Historical Society. But as with all of his projects, he did his own independent research as well, even taking to watching old Joey Lopes fights now on YouTube. Along the way, Clapper said he could identify with Lopes rise from a working-class neighborhood, as he did from north-east industrial Ohio, the first in his family to graduate from college.

A collaborative effort, Clapper’s team includes an engineer, a graphics company, a water-jet shop that cuts steel, and even an electrician to provide the installation’s night-lighting. As this article goes to print, the artwork’s stone is being brought from Kansas to Clapper’s studio. Preparations are underway to meet a tight deadline, with late May the hoped for completion date. Clapper wants West Sacramento to know that he is proud and pleased to be selected as the champion for Lopes’ tribute and hopes that it will embody the boxer and civic leader’s spirit: fighting for community.

Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye, Chief Justice of California, Named Guest Speaker for the 2016 Yolo County Women’s History Month Luncheon

Cantil-SakauyeThe Yolo County Women’s History Month Committee has announced Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye, Chief Justice of California, as its guest speaker for the 29th annual Women’s History Month luncheon scheduled for Thursday, March 10, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Woodland Community & Senior Center, 2001 East Street, Woodland.
Chief Justice Tani Gorre Cantil-Sakauye is the 28th Chief Justice of the State of California. She was sworn into office on Jan. 3, 2011 and is the first Asian-Filipina American and the second woman to serve as the state’s chief justice.
Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye was nominated to office in July 2010, unanimously confirmed by the Commission on Judicial Appointments in August 2010, and
overwhelmingly approved by voters in the November 2010 general election. At the time she was nominated as Chief Justice, she had served more than 20 years on California trial and appellate courts, including six years on the Court of Appeal, Third Appellate District, in Sacramento. As Chief Justice she also chairs the Judicial Council of California, the administrative policymaking body of state courts, and the Commission on Judicial Appointments.
A Sacramento native, Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye attended C. K. McClatchy High School and Sacramento City College before graduating with honors from the University of California, Davis, later receiving her JD from the UC Davis, Martin Luther King, Jr., School of Law.
She worked as a deputy district attorney for the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office, and then served on the senior staff of Governor Deukmejian, first as deputy legal affairs secretary and later as a deputy legislative secretary. 
Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye is a former board member of several nonprofit organizations and has been active in numerous professional community organizations, including membership in the California Judges Association, the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association, and the Sacramento Asian Bar Association, and received the Filipina of the Year Award. She is married to Mark Sakauye, a retired police lieutenant and they have two daughters.
The theme for the 2016 luncheon is “Working to Form a More Perfect Union: Honoring Women in Public Service and Government” and honors women who have shaped America’s history and its future through their public service and government leadership.
The luncheon will be catered by Anderson Family Catering & BBQ of Winters and the cost for the luncheon is $25. For reservations, make checks payable to WHM, and mail to WHM, P.O. Box 711, Woodland, CA 95776. Payment by credit card may be made online at www.ycwhm.org. Reservations and payment must be received by Friday, March 4, 2016, and reservations will not be sold at the door.
For general information about the luncheon, please contact Katherine Mawdsley at
530-758-5093 or Louisa R. Vessell at 916-451-2113 / lvessell@sbcglobal.net / 916-799-9932; or visit www.ycwhm.org.
The Yolo County Women’s History Month Committee is a California non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation. Please refer to website for sponsorship opportunities. Proceeds from the event will benefit the public libraries in Yolo County for the purchase of women’s history materials.

Shores of Hope partnered with Raley’s Food for Families to provide food to West Sac families

On Saturday, Jan. 16, Shores of Hope served families in need and distributed more than 300 bags of groceries thanks to a partnership with the Raley’s Food for Families program. The line opened at 9 a.m. and took place at Shores of Hope, 110 6th St. This distribution program named, Shores of Hope’s Groceries for Families, started in December where 300 bags of groceries were distributed within the first hour to West Sacramento families who visited the center located in the neighborhood of historic Broderick.
“I found out about this at the social services office” explained one of the recipients waiting in line at the December distribution. “I’m very thankful for this help.”
Such sentiments were echoed by many of the recipients coming from all over West Sacramento and expressed in English, Spanish and Russian.
Food For Families is a non-profit program that has raised more than $22 million and donated more than 12 million pounds of groceries to food banks in our communities since the program began as a holiday food drive in 1986. Shores of Hope shares the view of Raley’s Food for Families whose aim is to end hunger locally by providing fresh and healthy food to those who need it the most and getting real food to real families.
“I think Raley’s Food for Families chose Shores of Hope because of our connection with this community,” shares Shores of Hope Sergei Shkurkin. “The amount of families we serve in West Sacramento is perfect for the distribution of grocery bags full of food provided by Food for Families’ partners, such as Best Foods and Ben & Jerry’s, and the many donations given by local individuals who believe in the mission.”
Shores of Hope has been rebuilding the lives of those in need throughout the Sacramento Region since it began in 1920 as the United Christian Center and as the former Broderick Christian Center since 1952. The name change to Shores of Hope in October 2015 marks the growth of the center from a formal religious ministry to an organization that continues to offer service and hope to those mired in social crisis.

For more information, visit www.shoresofhope.org, call 837-9050 or email at sergeishkurkin@shoresofhope.org.

First-ever ‘State of the District’

The News-Ledger just received notice that Washington Unified School District has set a date for the first-ever ‘State of the District’ dinner.

The event is planned for Nov. 1 at River City High School.  It begins at 5:30 p.m., with dinner at 6. A speech by board president David Westin is expected.

Further details — including cost — have not yet been released.

 

 

EDITORIAL: City & school district turf battles

EDITORIAL – NEWS-LEDGER – APRIL 20, 2011 –

  Mayor Cabaldon and the local school district aren’t going to see eye-to-eye on this one.

At last week’s “State of the City” address by the mayor, Cabaldon took credit for bringing leadership reform to Washington Unified School District. A decade ago, as Cabaldon reminded his audience, the mayor formed a “blue ribbon commission” that harshly criticized the district and its school board. He then supported candidates for the school board who won and changed the board’s complexion.

Local schools started to improve after this intervention, he said.

Flash forward to the present date. There’s a new and different generation on the school board, led by board president Dave Westin. This board believes it’s on the right track, and believes that a 20-point jump in standardized student test scores last year proves it.

But Cabaldon doesn’t see it that way.

“Over the last three years, that remarkable progress has slowed somewhat,” said Cabaldon, in an oblique criticism of Westin’s regime. The mayor added that the test scores are masking a gap in achievement, particularly among Latino students, and they don’t address the drop-out problem.  He proposed some level of increased involvement by the city and community in this problem – although some of his suggestions were small (give preschoolers a few of their own books) and some were, as yet, still vague. But the real news was that he was again pushing the city government onto school board turf.

Now, the mayor doesn’t run the school district any more than the school district runs the city fire department. Cabaldon and Westin are not close partners. Comments such as those the mayor made last week aren’t likely to be well-received at 930 Westacre Road. Cabaldon is smart enough to know that before he spoke up.

Whether Westin and Cabaldon can get along well is unimportant. More important is whether local education can come out ahead if the local city government starts putting some pressure again upon the Washington Unified School District.

Copyright News-Ledger 2011