Earth Day celebrated in West Sacramento with fifth annual festival

Earth Day celebrated in West Sacramento with fifth annual festival

Photo courtesy Neighbors and friends gathered at city hall on Sunday, April 23 for the Fifth Annual West Sacramento Earth Day Festival. Treated to vendors offering information on resource and money saving More »

Wildlife Conservation Receives Public Funding at Elliott Ranch

Wildlife Conservation Receives Public Funding at Elliott Ranch

By Jan Dalske In June of 2016, a California state agency, the Delta Conservancy, awarded the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) a grant of $380,000. The money will be used to implement a More »

You Are Not Forgotten

You Are Not Forgotten

By Michele Townsend “YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN” are the words that are carved into Lt Gregory Hodson’s paving stone, that is located in the All Veterans Memorial section of Capitol Park.This section More »

 

9/11 flag display stirs in the breeze

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — SEPT. 11, 2013 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

The popular annual flag display came back to West Sacramento on Saturday, Sept. 7. But the 9/11 memorial contains some flag stories within the flag story.

The flags’ size and their grouping all make a point, explained Nancy Vinson, wife of chief flag organizer John Vinson.

For instance, the large flags:

“There are 300 – one for about each 10 victims (of the September 11, 2001 attacks). They’re in 13 rows – one for each of the original colonies. And the small flags, there’s one for each person lost at each attack site.”

That adds up to over 3,000 flags overall.

One group of flags is dedicated to those killed when one hijacked plane hit the Pentagon during the terrorist attack.

“There are 125 flags, for those that worked in the Pentagon and died there,” said Vinson. “Inside, there are 59 – for those who were on the plane that hit the Pentagon.”

There’s a grouping for police from the New York Police Department and the city’s port authority (60 flags), and one for the firefighters killed that day (343, many of whom went into the doomed twin towers in New York).

Then there is the group of 40 slightly larger flags in one group at the display.

“This is Flight 93,” said Vinson. “These flags are a little bit bigger. The reason, John says, is because they were the first heroes. They were the first people to fight back (against their hijackers). They actually diverted their plane from its hijacked course, where it was probably going to hit the Capitol building or the White House or some other target on the East Coast.”

And there’s something new at the flag display this year: a group of four flags honoring those who lost their lives to the bombs at the Boston Marathon in April.

This banner carries a slogan featuring the Twin Towers in New York, and the signatures of scores of veterans and firefighters. Flanking it are John and Nancy Vinson. (News-Ledger photo)

This banner carries a slogan featuring the Twin Towers in New York, and the signatures of scores of veterans and firefighters. Flanking it are John and Nancy Vinson.
(News-Ledger photo)

The annual flag display also shows off a banner to which any passing service veteran or firefighter is invited to sign. Dozens have, including vets from Iraq and Afghanistan as well as at least one from World War II.

John Vinson, a Sacramento contractor, reports that the flag display went up with help from a group of volunteers – including some from the local fire department’s “CERT” (Community Emergency Response Team) program. It’s scheduled to come down Thursday morning, September 12 – leaving today as the last day for visitors to take a look.

Last year, John Vinson’s flag display drew over 2,000 visitors. For many, it’s become an annual event every year..

Last Wednesday – the anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks – the site at Jefferson Boulevard and South River Road was scheduled to host a horn player from “Buglers Across America.” Early in the morning, at the exact moments of each of the hijacked airplanes’ impacts, the bugler was scheduled to ring out a rendition of “Taps.”

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

River City High School’s bands need some donated musical instruments

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — 

The River City High School music program is firing up for another year, and band members would welcome any donated instruments.

If you have an unused musical instrument, consider donating it to the program. Contact Tony Marvelli, director of bands, at amarvelli@wusd.k12.ca.us or 375-7800 ext. 2210. Visit www.rivercityregiment.com or drop by the school at 1 Raider Lane.

Copyright News-Ledger-2013

Cyclist dies after Southport crash

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — SEPT 11, 2013 —

A bicyclist hit by a car in rural Southport on August 23 has died of his injuries.

The Sacramento County Coroner’s office has identified the victim as West Sacramento’s Kevin Cavanaugh.

According to Lieutenant Tod Sockman of the West Sacramento Police Department, the accident occurred at about 8:40 p.m. He added:

“The preliminary investigation indicates a bicyclist was riding southbound on Jefferson Boulevard.  Witnesses report the bicyclist rode into oncoming traffic and was struck by a single vehicle traveling northbound on Jefferson Boulevard.  The bicyclist sustained serious injuries and was transported by ambulance to the UC Davis Medical Center.”

Cavanaugh died four days later.

Police closed a stretch of Jefferson Boulevard when they responded to investigate.

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

‘Cats 101’: a dog person brushes up

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 28, 2013 —

Over the years I have written numerous columns about dogs. I have talked at great length about my own beloved Cocker Spaniel, Mikey, including a column about the terrible day I had to finally put him to sleep. I also wrote a little series of columns about my daughter’s crazy adopted dog, Little Suze, who needed to be put on doggie Prozac because of her separation anxiety and fear of abandonment issues. I even got a good friend mad at me because I wrote about how it’s dachshunds (she loves them) that you need to be worried about biting you, not pit bulls, because weiner dogs bite more people each year than any other breed of dog. In fact, I even got in trouble for calling them weiner dogs, which apparently is something a real dachshund-lover would never do.

BY DARYL FISHER, News-Ledger Features Editor

BY DARYL FISHER, News-Ledger Features Editor

Anyway, I have really enjoyed writing dog columns over the years, and since there are so many dog owners in West Sacramento who can relate to the trials, tribulations and joys of having a dog, I have often received quite a bit of positive feedback from writing them. However, after last week’s column, which was about what to do with the family dog when vacation time rolls around, I received a phone call that started off with a rather alarming question.

“So,” asked the caller, “what’s your problem with cats?”

“But I don’t have a problem with cats,” I quickly assured her.

“Then how come you only write about dogs?”

“Well,” I said, scrambling for an answer, “I guess it’s because I’ve never owned a cat and don’t know much about them.”

“Then you do have a problem with cats!”

“No, not really, it’s just that I was raised in a house with dogs and have always liked having one around. And then when I got married, it turned out that my daughter was very allergic to cats, so that was the one pet my kids were never allowed to  have.”

“So, you’re blaming your hatred of cats on your daughter’s allergies, hey?”

As our conversation continued, it dawned on me that cat lovers take their relationships with cats very seriously and that in journalistic fairness, I did need to learn more about cats and maybe even write a column about them. The only cat I had ever been around was a big fat black and white one named Timmy, who belonged to my brother and often made us laugh by the way he would sleep on top of my brother’s warm television set in the winter time and then sooner or later fall off of it, landing with a big thud on the carpet. My brother was very proud of the fact that Timmy was apparently the only cat in existence who didn’t know how to land on his feet when he fell off of something.

So, in preparation for writing this column, I decided to call a very nice lady and longtime subscriber of the News-Ledger that I was sure knew everything there is to know about cats (she has a whole house full of them) and our conversation went a little something like this:

“Why do you suddenly want to know all about my cats?” she asked me.

“Because I got called out the other day for only writing about dogs in my newspaper column.”

“Oh, I’ve noticed that, too. But maybe you’re just a dog person. You know, it’s really true that there are dog people and then there are cat people, and they’re very different.”

“Why do you think that is?”

“I’m not really sure,” she said, “but I think it has something to do with the fact that cats are a lot more complicated than dogs, and a cat owner has to expend a lot more mental and emotional energy to successfully cohabitate with them.”

“How so?” I asked with interest.

“Well, first of all, you have to take the time to understand all their peculiar behaviors. For instance, you have to learn what all their different vocalizations mean. Cats meow and purr and trill and hiss and make all kinds of other strange sounds that all have a meaning, and if you don’t know what a cat is trying to tell you, you can end up making them miserable, not to mention getting yourself scratched or bitten. They are also nocturnal and territorial by nature, sleep a whole lot during the day, need to scratch and knead, scent mark everything in sight, and God forbid you don’t keep their litter box clean.”

“You know,” I said, “I’m afraid all I really know about cats is that I read somewhere that they kill over 65 million birds all over the world every year, not to mention all the countless vermin they pounce on and kill nightly.”

“It’s true that cats are little killing machines,” said my friend, “and many of their unique behaviors come from the fact that we only think we can totally domesticate them. All I know is that I have always loved cats and I can’t imagine life without having them around.”

“So, of all your cats, which one is your favorite?” I asked.

“Oh, that would be a big old loveable tomcat I’ve had for ages.”

“What makes him so special?”

“Oh, I don’t know, but I suspect it has something to do with the fact that he’s just like my husband.”

“Really? How so?”

“Well, among other things, he expects to be fed on time, he walks away from me when I’m talking to him, and, if I were to ever let him stay out at night, he would get himself into all kinds of trouble.”

 

  Do you like what you see here?

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  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013