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By Michele Townsend People say that death is a part of life, but people shouldn’t outlive their children! This is a heart-wrenching statement that far too many people have had to live More »

Woodland Man Graduates from Mental Health Court

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Yolo County District Attorney Jeff Reisig announced today that on Monday September 25, 2017, 41-year-old Davis resident Gary Wight successfully graduated from Mental Health Court in Department Four of the Yolo County More »

Scripture, Service, and Being Sikh in West Sacramento

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The soaring white domes of the Sikh Temple of Sacramento, or “Gurdwara Sahib”, are a familiar sight to many West Sacramento residents. But for West Sacramento resident Parveen Kaur Tumber, the temple More »

 

9/11 flag display returns to West Sac

VISITORS TO LAST YEAR'S DISPLAY: West Sacramento’s Cheng Saetern takes a photo of son Derrick Saelee; watching are family members Sharon Saechao and (partially hidden) Abigail Saelee (News-Ledger photo, 2012)

VISITORS TO LAST YEAR’S DISPLAY: West Sacramento’s Cheng Saetern takes a photo of son Derrick Saelee; watching are family members Sharon Saechao and (partially hidden) Abigail Saelee (News-Ledger photo, 2012)

NEWS-LEDGER ONLINE — SEPT. 6, 2013 —

John Vinson will bring back his big annual flag display tomorrow.

He promises 400 large American flags and almost 3,000 smaller flags, with each one commemorating a single one of the lives lost in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The display will go up Saturday at its usual location, the east side of Jefferson Boulevard at South River Road.

This year’s memorial will also include a display honoring those who died in the Boston Marathon bombing on April 15, 2013.

JOHN VINSON (courtesy photo)

JOHN VINSON (courtesy photo)

Vinson, a former West Sacramento resident, has led a team of volunteers putting up the display every year since 2001.

The memorial will be open to the public 24 hours a day through Wednesday, September 11, he reports. In addition to the flags, the display typically includes an exhibit honoring firefighters who responded and perished in the Twin Towers bombing on 9/11/01.

This year, the West Sacramento flag display will be the site of a coordinated, nation-wide observance of the terrorist attacks. A bugler from “Buglers Across America” will be on hand to play “Taps” at the exact anniversary of the moment of impact of each of the airplanes that crashed during the 2001 attacks.

Visit the Southport site at 5:45 a.m., 6:03 a.m., 6:13 a.m. or 7:10 a.m. on Wednesday, September 11, to hear “Taps” played.

Afterward, there will be silent prayer and follow-up rendition of “Taps” at this site and at other locations across the U.S.

“Last year, we had over 2,000 attendees and we hope it will be well attended again this year,” emailed Vinson.

The site is located along Jefferson about a mile south of U.S.50, at South River Road.

 

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  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

 

Air Force JROTC starts up at River City High School

NEWS-LEDGER NEWSPAPER — AUG 28, 2013 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

A military officer prep program has returned to West Sacramento’s main high school after an absence of many years.

This time, it’s the Air Force which is on the River City High School campus for its “JROTC,” or Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps. Principal Katie Nemer says the program is being held in three class-loads. And it’s popular.

KATIE NEMER Principal at RCHS in West Sacramento (WUSD website photo)

KATIE NEMER
Principal at RCHS in West Sacramento
(WUSD website photo)

“We have about 110 signed up,” said Nemer. “We actually have a waiting list of about 45 kids. It’s a year-long class – it teaches military history, avionics, national security – everything you could think of to prepare for a career in the military.”

“But,” added Nemer, “the purpose is not necessarily for them to join the military, it’s to learn what they need to know to become good members of the community.”

The coursework is led by Air Force Colonel Russell Warner and an enlisted Air Force enlisted man. In an email, Warner echoed Nemer’s comment, saying the JROTC program’s mission  is to “develop citizens of character dedicated to serving their nation and community.”

For some students in the new program, JROTC may be a path towards officer status in the Air Force. But for how many?

“It’s too early to tell that,” Nemer told the News-Ledger. “Many think they will go into the military. But that’s not our purpose. The purpose is to provide what they need to become excellent citizens.”

The year-long coursework is heavy on physical conditioning. Participating freshmen get physical education credit; higher-level students get “elective” credit for the JROTC class.

Principal Nemer said nobody has protested the involvement of a military program on campus.

“It’s just the opposite,” she commented. “I can’t tell you how many people have been saying, ‘Thank you, thank you, thank you!’”

 

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

 

Native plants bring native pollinators: the right plants bring butterflies in Yolo

Anise Swallowtail Butterfly, photo courtesy of Mieko Watkins of Tuleyome. (Click to enlarge)

Anise Swallowtail Butterfly, photo courtesy of Mieko Watkins of Tuleyome. (Click to enlarge)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 28, 2013 —

By Nancy Bauer
Tuleyome Association

My native habitat gardening journey started almost 20 years ago, right after viewing a slide show presentation by two passionate butterfly gardeners. The magic of those butterfly gardens resurrected memories of a favorite childhood garden— a glorious tangle of fragrant flowers, hanging vines, and sweet purple grapes.  Growing wild next to the vegetable garden was a stand of milkweed that brought in Monarch butterflies in the late summer, and later fascinated me with fluffy seed heads that floated off in the wind.

Most everyone wants to see butterflies in the garden, but true pollinator habitat means planting for the butterfly caterpillars, too. The female butterfly lays her eggs on specific host plants and these are the only plants that caterpillar species can feed on.  They can be anything from trees and shrubs to grasses and other ground plants.  For some butterflies, like the Monarch, there is only one host plant—milkweed.  With Monarch populations in serious decline we need to plant milkweed, especially along the Monarch’s migratory route.  (In northern California, Monarchs migrate around September.)  There are various native milkweeds to choose from including narrowleaf milkweed and showy milkweed.

In the Sacramento area, the once common West Coast Lady and Anise Swallowtail butterflies are now much harder to find.  The West Coast Ladies and Painted Ladies use lupines and members of the mallow family, such as checkerbloom, desert or bush mallow, and cheeseweed for their host plants. The black and yellow Anise Swallowtail uses members of the carrot family (umbellifers).  Avoid non-native invasive wild fennel, and stick with lovage, angelica, bronze fennel, culinary fennels, parsley, or dill to attract this butterfly to your garden.  The Western Tiger Swallowtail is also frequent visitor and use willows as host plants.  Another common garden butterfly in our region, the Buckeye, uses snapdragons and their relatives as hosts.  If you find black caterpillars on your snapdragons, you may be hosting Buckeye butterflies.  Be sure to plant enough to share!

Where the orange-and-black Monarch butterfly comes from: this caterpillar. Photo courtesy of Mary Hanson, Tuleyome. (Click to enlarge)

Where the orange-and-black Monarch butterfly comes from: this caterpillar. Photo courtesy of Mary Hanson, Tuleyome. (Click to enlarge)

If you want to find out which butterflies hang out in your neighborhood, plant a butterfly bush and buy a good butterfly guide.  When you have identified the butterflies, plant their caterpillar food plants.  The huge aster-sunflower family provides us with many good butterfly nectar plants, and they offer a broad landing platform. Be sure to plant your nectar flowers in drifts of just one species, which is much more attractive to butterflies and other pollinators than if you plant many different nectar flowers, but only one of each kind. The key to creating habitat for butterflies and other pollinators is to grow a diversity of good nectar plants that bloom in different seasons.  Put your butterfly host plants near nectar plants but in the more “wild” parts of the garden where there is less activity and foot traffic.  Be an informal (and organic) gardener.  Be less eager to prune and clean up:  butterfly chrysalides could be hiding most anywhere in the garden

The first butterflies to arrive in my garden nectar on my native sages which bloom early in spring.  In late spring and summer, they have moved to the buddleias, verbenas, and scabiosa, and in the fall, they nectar on asters, Michelmas daisies and Mexican sunflowers (which is a favorite of Monarch butterflies).  This year, I was thrilled to see pipevine swallowtails and their caterpillars on the Dutchman’s pipe; and because I grow coffeeberry, creambush, willow and ceanothus, I frequently see Pale Swallowtails, Spring Azures, and Lorquin’s Admirals in my garden. Plant for butterflies.  They will come.

  Nancy Bauer is a wildlife habitat gardener in Sonoma County, and is the author of “The California Wildlife Habitat Garden” (UC Press, 2012, ISBN 0520267818).  Photos by Mieko Watkins and Mary K. Hanson; used with permission.  Tuleyome Tales is a monthly publication of Tuleyome, a conservation organization with offices in Woodland and Napa, California. For more information go online to www.tuleyome.org.

 

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

 

Basic computers: a class for seniors Tuesday in West Sacramento

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

A “computer basics for seniors” class is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Sept, 3, at the local library, 1212 Merkley Avenue. Pre-registration, library card and library PIN are required. Visit the library to sign up.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013