Woodland Man Graduates from Mental Health Court

Woodland Man Graduates from Mental Health Court

Yolo County District Attorney Jeff Reisig announced today that on Monday September 25, 2017, 41-year-old Davis resident Gary Wight successfully graduated from Mental Health Court in Department Four of the Yolo County More »

Scripture, Service, and Being Sikh in West Sacramento

Scripture, Service, and Being Sikh in West Sacramento

The soaring white domes of the Sikh Temple of Sacramento, or “Gurdwara Sahib”, are a familiar sight to many West Sacramento residents. But for West Sacramento resident Parveen Kaur Tumber, the temple More »

West Sac heroes earn their capes:  Senator Dr. Richard Pan’s “Unsung Heroes” celebrated with awards at the State Capitol

West Sac heroes earn their capes: Senator Dr. Richard Pan’s “Unsung Heroes” celebrated with awards at the State Capitol

By Michele Townsend Twelve recipients (two of them from West Sacramento!) were awarded their hero capes and senatorial certificates in a small gathering on Tuesday, Sept. 26 at the State Capitol. Senator More »

 

Special porch ornament goes missing

A Southport woman just wants her bear back. It was custom-carved 25 years ago, and has "almost part of the family." (courtesy photo)

A Southport woman just wants her bear back. It was custom-carved 25 years ago, and has “almost part of the family.” (courtesy photo)

NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 10, 2013 —

By Daryl Fisher
News-Ledger Features Editor

Last weekend, Marlene Perini woke up as she always does and went outside her Alder Way home to get her Sunday newspaper. She quickly spotted her paper, but to her shock, her beloved wooden bear was no longer on the front porch as it has been for more than two decades.

“I bought my wonderful hard-carved wooden bear at a crafts show 25 years ago,” explained Marlene.  “He was created by a very talented artist who used a chainsaw to do most of the work and he did it right in front of my eyes as I waited. And after all of these years of sitting on my front porch, he is almost part of the family. He is always decorated for the holidays, surrounded by pretty poinsettias at Christmas time and a flag or spinning wheel in his hand on the 4th of July. I have lived in the very same house in the first subdivision they ever created in Southport for a very long time and nothing has ever been stolen off my front porch before. I live less than a mile away from Our Lady of Grace Catholic School and it makes you wonder what the world is coming to.”

Marlene is not really interested in getting anyone into any trouble, she just wants her bear back.

“Whoever you are who took my bear,” said Marlene, “just please put it back on my front porch right where you found it, and there will be no questions asked. Or since it is such a unique looking bear, if anybody has seen it around town, please contact the police since they know I am looking for it. He and I will both be a lot happier if he is back on my front porch where he belongs.”

  (EDITOR’S NOTE: anyone wishing to return the bear may also phone the News-Ledger, 916-371-8030.)

Copyright News-Ledger — 2013

Parenthood: power of genes & ignorance

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 3, 2013 —

I was talking to a friend the other day about how he wished he had been a better parent.

“What are you talking about?” I asked him in disbelief. “You are one of the best parents I know.”

BY DARYL FISHER, News-Ledger Features Editor

BY DARYL FISHER, News-Ledger Features Editor

“But my kids have had more than their fair share of problems as they have gotten older,” explained my friend, “and I just feel like I should have done a better job of preparing them for life. Sometimes it seems like their personalities have gotten them into all kinds of trouble that could have been easily avoided if they just weren’t who they are, if you know what I mean. And maybe if I had been a little more forceful when they were young about dealing with some of their less than attractive personality traits – you know, like stubbornness, or being too judgmental, or failing to see the humor in things – they wouldn’t have had to learn so many lessons the hard way.”

“You know,” I said, “I think most of us parents think we have a whole lot more to do with how our children turn out than we actually do, especially when it comes to their personalities.”

“What do you mean?”

“Think back to when your kids were really young,” I said. “Now if they were like mine, then they were already pretty much who they were going to be at a very early age. For instance, one of my kids never went to sleep at the proper time when he was a baby, and he still stays up half the night; another was very quiet and shy, and still is; another loved to eat and still drools over a really good meal, while one had to be almost force-fed when he was young and still plays around with his food instead of eating it. And when it comes to their personalities, it seems to me like they were all pretty much set in stone at a very early age. The ones that were better at sharing, or being sweet and loveable, or even at cleaning up their rooms, still are, while the ones who drove me nuts still do.”

“Why do you think that is?” asked my friend with interest.

“Well, I think parents really underestimate the power of the genes that are handed down to our kids, and I’m not just talking about the ones we give them. For instance, my oldest son reminds me much more of my father than he does of me, both in his personality and the way he looks. And my youngest son is a lot like my father-in-law, so I think the genes our kids get often skip generations, sometimes maybe even many generations, and I wouldn’t be all that surprised if some of my kids’ personality traits go all the way back to some guy named Fisher on the Mayflower.”

“But even if genes do play a major role in who our kids turn out to be, you must have had a few basic principles that you used as guideposts when you were raising your kids?”

“Oh sure, I had lots of those.”

“Like what for instance?”

“Well, if I remember right, parental ignorance was pretty high up on that list. Believe me, if I had known about all the stuff my kids were up to when they were young, I would have probably had a stroke. Mercifully, most of them were pretty good at keeping me in the dark, and like they say, ignorance really is bliss. Plus if the truth be known, my kids more or less raised me and made me into the grown up you see today, not the other way around.”

“So, you had a pretty much `hands off policy’ when it came to parenting?”

“Well, my kids probably wouldn’t say that, since they swear I was always on their case, but when they were young, I barely had the time to keep up with every aspect of my life, much less my children’s. Plus kids really need their own space, and parents are always forgetting that. So I really have come to believe that we adults need to sit back and take parenting a lot less seriously than we do. Now that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t create the most loving, safe and kid-friendly environment possible for our children, but at the same time, we can’t be putting all of our eggs into our kids’ baskets.”

“What do you mean by that?”

“I mean that we all only get one life to live and we need to be out there doing it, not living our lives through our children, or putting all of our self-worth into how they turn out. The reality is that in addition to enriching our lives, our children will break our hearts now and then, and we need to understand that’s just part of the agreement you’re signing onto when you decide to be a parent. Plus what most kids end up doing anyway is forgiving us for our parenting mistakes once they have kids of their own and realize just what a hard and often thankless job it is. So if I were you, I wouldn’t be spending too much time thinking you should have been a better parent. I mean, it’s already bad enough that all of us parents get to worry about our kids pretty much non-stop until the day we die!”

 

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Go to River Cats game & support local foster children

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 10, 2013

Attend the River Cats game on July 13 and support local Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) programs, which help represent children in foster care situations. For tickets, go to www.rivercats.com/fundraisers, selected CASA YOLO, and use the offer code: “Child.” Tickets are $10-22, and may be printed on your computer.

For more information on Yolo CASA, visit www.yolocasa.org.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

West Sac residence used for regional firefighters’ practice

QUICK SEARCH: A West Sacramento fire crew practices what do do when they arrive on scene and learn a victim is likely trapped in an upper floor of a burning house.    They used the ladder to break in a plywood “window,” then reset the ladder. Firefighters then “went in low, below the smoke,” explained W.S.F.D. Battalion Chief Rebecca Ramirez, and searched the room. In the photo above, you can see a little bit of the “victim” towards the right -- it’s a 175-pound practice dummy. News-Ledger photo

QUICK SEARCH: A West Sacramento fire crew practices what do do when they arrive on scene and learn a victim is likely trapped in an upper floor of a burning house.
They used the ladder to break in a plywood “window,” then reset the ladder. Firefighters then “went in low, below the smoke,” explained W.S.F.D. Battalion Chief Rebecca Ramirez, and searched the room. In the photo above, you can see a little bit of the “victim” towards the right — it’s a 175-pound practice dummy.
News-Ledger photo

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 3, 2013 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

Although the fake smoke machine wasn’t on hand Friday morning, the goal was still to make it “as real as possible” for firefighters training at a borrowed multi-residential unit on B Street, said Rebecca Ramirez, a Battalion Chief for the West Sacramento Fire Department.

Retired firefighter and landlord Ric Dorris lent the building out for the session.

Visiting to hone their techniques and “get on the same page” were crews from Davis, UC Davis, Woodland and Yolo’s Yocha Dehe tribe, along with West Sac. They’re often often called upon to back each other up and work together.

“It’s about sharing knowledge and best practices, said Ramirez.

Not too many years ago, fire departments could be dismayed to arrive on scene in a neighboring jurisdiction and find that their hoses weren’t compatible with the locals’.  Or that they had different terminologies. A lot of those troubles have been solved. But not all.

“If someone says, I have a firefighter in trouble who entered the ‘alpha’ side, everybody needs to know what that is,” she explained.

A burning structure gets each side named, and “alpha” is often the front. Progressing around the building are its other walls — “beta,” “charlie” and so on.

At training sessions like this, firefighters also practice specific techniques — “the more ‘tools’ you have in your toolbox, the more likely you can solve a problem,” said Ramirez.

News-Ledger photo

News-Ledger photo

 

 FALLEN FIREFIGHTER: West Sacramento Fire Department’s James Staley, acting as instructor (above) , explains how to lift a firefighter who has fallen through the floor into the basement.

  “They get a ‘charged’ hose line in there and push it down through the floor,” explained Rebecca Ramirez, W.S.F.D. Battalion Chief. “They anchor one end. They attache a loop. The firefighter actually gets on it and straddles it, and climbs the end that is anchored.”

  While the firefighter is climbing, his colleagues are lifting the other end of the hose to help.

  You can see that part of the exercise — what’s going on below the hole in the floor — below.

(News-Ledger photo)

(News-Ledger photo)

ABOVE: Some of the firefighters on scene Friday to train at a vacant residential unit on B Street. Battalion Chief Rebecca Ramirez is at far left  (and she receives  a promotion to Division Chief this week). News-Ledger photo.

ABOVE: Some of the firefighters on scene Friday to train at a vacant residential unit on B Street. Battalion Chief Rebecca Ramirez is at far left (and she receives a promotion to Division Chief this week). News-Ledger photo.

  Do you like what you see here?

 

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

 

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

 

Copyright News-Ledger 2013