West Sacramento Deputy Fire Chief hopes to inspire more diverse fire crews as she takes over as Fire Chief in Woodland

West Sacramento Deputy Fire Chief hopes to inspire more diverse fire crews as she takes over as Fire Chief in Woodland

By Daniel Wilson Early in her career, West Sacramento Deputy Fire Chief Rebecca Ramirez, who will take over as the first female fire chief for the Woodland Fire Department on Feb. 27, More »

A Day in the Life of A Palestinian Immigrant

A Day in the Life of A Palestinian Immigrant

By Stacy Grow A stay-at-home mother of three children, West Sacramento resident Nasreen F.’s life is currently filled with caring for her children and home. Born and raised near Jerusalem in a More »

Our Lady of Grace Parish Honors Sister Michael Henry on her 80th Birthday

Our Lady of Grace Parish Honors Sister Michael Henry on her 80th Birthday

By Jan Dalske for the News Ledger Parishioners of Our Lady of Grace Parish in West Sacramento gathered in the church hall last month to celebrate Sister Michael Henry’s 80th Birthday. Sister More »

 

Longtime West Sacramentan is docent at the drought-tolerant exhibit at the California State Fair

By Monica Stark
editor@news-ledger.com

Tucked behind Building B at the California State Fair lies a large outdoor garden area, from exhibits on rice farming, to aquaponics, there’s also a drought-tolerant display which demonstrates how to transform a typical lawn to a low-water Shangri-La, which was planted in May and will be on display for three years.
With California in its fifth year of drought, inspiring visitors to make conservation a way of life is what Department of Water Resource’s three California State Fair exhibits are designed to accomplish now through July 24. The trio of exhibits, dubbed Conservation: The California Lifestyle, feature drought-tolerant landscaping ideas, edible gardens and take-home information on conservation. Flyers are available for DWR turf rebates and water-wise plant lists.
Evelyn Tipton, a resident of the Summerfield area in West Sacramento, retired from the California Department of Water Resources after 36 years as a civil engineer and volunteers at the fair at one of the department’s outdoor exhibits.
“We have rebates and everyone calls up the department and says, ‘Well, how do we get the rebates? What do we do to convert our yards?’ So we set up the exhibit to go through the entire process from planning, stripping the yard out, irrigation system, hardscaping, plant selection, different types of landscaping.”
Tipton said in order to qualify for the rebates projects should be done in 120 days, though with the help of professionals it could be done in just a few days. Before and after pictures are definitely recommended.
Asked what some of the biggest challenges one faces when undergoing this kind of transformation, Tipton said, laughing, “Bermuda grass.” Also, “understanding and being able to plan out and picture it, that’s my problem. My daughter’s a photographer so she is really good at laying things out. ‘I know this will look good here and here and here.’ Me: I can do the technical stuff, but laying out is the hardest part for me and then it’s just the matter of the labor.”
While the California Department of Water Resources main concern is water supply, the rebates and encouraging drought-tolerant landscapes to this extent is a rather new undertaking. Prior residents would typically content their local water supplier, Tipton said. “We’re statewide and usually it’s a local water supplier that’s involved with the smaller areas.”
Giving a tour of the state fair display, Tipton started at the beginning: The planning stage. “You have to map out your house, your yard, how much area you are working with, the direction it’s facing (south, west, north, east) – that makes a great deal of difference of where you put your plants. You need to know where your shade’s going to be. If you have a north side face, you’ll pretty much be in the shade the whole time. It depends what kind of soil you got. In West Sacramento, in my area, it’s pretty much all clay, not so organic. Clay holds water but it’s not that easy to work with. It doesn’t drain well and it tends to run off, rather than soak in. So you have to amend your clay soil with gypsum or a lot of organic soil. Gypsum goes into the molecules and breaks up the individual, but the particles in clay soil are so fine that it breaks it apart chemically to loosen up your clay soil. And, then you add organic to it.”
You need to figure out where you are going to have your trees, Tipton advised, recommending putting trees near streets and driveways.
“We like to drive around neighborhoods and see what others have done, find projects we really like.” Also, during the planning stage, sign up for rebates, she suggested.
After the planning stage, it’s time for turf removal. Tipton recommends RoundUp and/or solarization (covering the problem area with a black tarp that will cook the grass). Solarization does sterilize the area so Tipton said you need to add in some worms and mulch. Or, you can also just dig up the grass. Then you lay down cardboard or newspaper. “I need to level my yard, put mulch on it. The advantage of this is when you want to plant it, you don’t want to have to remove the cardboard. You can clear out the mulch, cut a hole, and stick it in through the hole. That keeps the weeds out too.”
You need to lay out your yard and add a controller that will control how much water goes to each area. After that if you have any hardscaping paths, this is the time to put in walkways. Just make sure you put down permeable landscape material, sand on top and then lay your rock or brick into that. Just be sure you compact that sand pretty well or the rocks will shift.
Then you put the mulch down, followed by planting, suggested Tipton. “You need to put the right kind of plants together. If plants take more water, you need them in one area. Shade-loving plants you need to put them in the shade. And take into account how big those plants are going to grow. The fair display includes a pollinator garden, where they have salvia, butterfly bush, lantana.” Besides the pollinator garden, there are fruit trees on display as well as vegetables.
To get some more great ideas visit Tipton at the fair. The display is open everyday until the fair ends on Sunday. Visit www.castatefair.org for more information.

West Sacramentan lines her neighborhood with American flags for the nation’s birthday

By Monica Stark
editor@news-ledger.com

West Sacramento’s Heather Moore decided to line Grande Vista Avenue and Claredon Street with nearly 300 American flags, bringing joy and patriotism to her neighborhood.

Neighbor Marie called the display “wholesome and prideful.” Margaret, who also lives in that area, said happily, “They were beautiful.”

Heather said she started to put some up on Friday and Saturday she got up and did the rest of them and took them down on Tuesday. “It was fun. I started with a few houses and decided I’d just do the whole street,” she said.

Heather got the flags from a box inside the VFW. “I had to iron all of them. They had been wrapped in a box for so long. No one wanted them. And I thought, shoot they are here. Everyone loved it. There was not one person upset.”

A proud West Sacramentan, Heather said the 4th of July to her means freedom and the ability to enjoy her neighbors. “I love my neighbors – the fact I can go ask a neighbor for an egg or they can ask me for something. We wave to all of our neighbors when they come up on our street. (Regarding the flags) I thought, ‘Why not? It’s America. It’s our birthday. The VFW had them; it didn’t kill me and I got a great response.

During Christmastime, Heather likes to decorate “Charlie Brown Christmas” style. “I have a full on dog house. Christmas is my favorite holiday. We go all out. I have to start decorating in middle of November. Once Thanksgiving dinner is over, I flip a switch and there you go.”

Joseph “Joey” Lopes Park made official at ribbon-cutting ceremony

Daniel Wilson
dwilson@dwilsononline.com

West Sacramento has a brand new park, and on Friday, June 24, it was made official at a ribbon-cutting ceremony where the family of the park’s namesake Joseph “Joey” Lopes shared stories about the famous boxer who called the area home during his life.

The park, which is the 35th park in the city, is located next to the Parkside Apartments along Sycamore Avenue off of West Capitol and features a newly-installed piece of artwork, which was created by Denver, Colorado artist Michael Clapper.

The $70,000 art structure—which Clapper says represents “fighting for community”—was approved by the City Council on Jan. 13 with Clapper’s piece being chosen over 75 other submissions after the City of West Sacramento’s Arts, Culture & Historic Preservation Commission, the Yolo Arts Council, city staff and others gave input.

The park cost $8.2 million to install and features a garden, benches, picnic tables, water fountains, two playgrounds, — one each for younger and older children — a basketball court and plenty of walking paths and green grass. The park has several trees as well, but it’ll be a while before they provide any shade. In the meantime, there are two shade shelters located at each side of the park.

Superintendent of West Sacramento Parks & Ground Sam Cooney explained that the project has been in the works for six years.

“It’s been a long time in the making,” said Cooney. “The state awarded the city $4.1 million and then we put in matching funds.”

Schmidt Design Group Principal J.T. Barr added that the park’s design incorporated a lot of feedback from the residents of West Sacramento.

“The design really started with the inspiration of the community,” said Barr. “All of the forms and structures, the walkways [were] really inspired by West Sacramento and the agricultural heritage that is here, so we really wanted to embrace the community and express that in the park, so the park really becomes a reflection of the community.

The ceremony began at 10 a.m. with a few words from West Sacramento City Manager Martin Tuttle, who thanked the landscapers, city inspector and project manager among others who worked on the park.

“What we do in West Sacramento is we take local money and we go out and find other money to match with it,” said Tuttle. “That’s how we’re able to do great things for the city.”

Martin then introduced City Council Member Chris Ledesma, who spoke about the park and the collaborative effort it took to complete.

“As many of you know, this site, for a long time, was an eye-soar,” said Ledesma as children played with bubbles and ran around in the grass area just behind where the audience of approximately 100 West Sacramento citizens, Lopes family members and city leaders was seated. “And now look at this 4 acres we’re sitting on today. Congratulations to everybody who had a hand in this.”

Ledesma went on to say that just as it took the entire community to design and implement the park, it’ll take the entire community to keep it clean, safe and welcoming in the years to come.

He then announced a new park watch program, designed to cut down on vandalism and crime, which will be headed up by West Sacramento PD Officer Warren Estrada.

“It’s up to all of us to keep an eye on this park and it’s up to all of us to work with the police department to make sure we maintain this park and keep the spirit of Joey Lopes going,” said Ledesma.

Ledesma then introduced Silvestre Gilmete Jr., the nephew of Joey Lopes, who called up several other family members before beginning his speech about his uncle’s impact.

A hometown hero who lived near Sycamore all of his life, Joey Lopes was a boxer in the late 1940s and throughout the 1950s. Lopes always wore his name and the words “West Sacramento” on the robes he wore to the ring and made sure that everyone knew he was from West Sacramento, not Sacramento.

He competed at the Memorial Auditorium and the world-famous Madison Square Garden among many other venues. In 1948, Lopes was selected for the U.S. Olympic boxing team and he went on to fight in three matches with the Lightweight championship up for grabs.

Following his retirement, Lopes was a community leader, working for the West Sacramento Sanitary District, the West Sacramento Optimist Club and the West Sacramento Babe Ruth Baseball League.

The park’s art features a silhouette of Lopes with his arm reaching out in a boxing punch and will light up at night as the sun sets behind it. On the flipside of the structure is a map of the West Sacramento area.

After Gilmete Jr. thanked the city and everyone involved on behalf of the family, shared some history of his uncle and introduced longtime friend Raul Deanda, who told some stories about his friend’s illustrious career and life’s journey, the ceremony ended with the cutting of the ribbon and loud cheers and applause from everyone in attendance.

As children filled the playgrounds, shot hoops at the basketball court and ran around the grassy areas, adults snapped photos of the artwork and the park while others enjoyed snacks and conversation.

Gilmete Jr. expressed the gratitude of his family for the city naming the park after his uncle.

“This is a tremendous honor,” said Gilmete Jr. who explained that the family petitioned to have the park’s name changed from Sycamore Park to Joey Lopes Park after learning it was being installed, a motion that was met with a unanimous decision from the city. “My uncle was about his community and it being so close to where he lived as a kid and as an adult and to see that this park incorporates a playground for children to be able to enjoy, half-court basketball for any age to enjoy and the community garden with my grandparents [having had a farm here], it’s just incredible.”

Serving Senate District 6: Dr. Richard Pan discusses controversy and current legislation

By Monica Stark

He wanted to go where the people were and he did.

Situating his office in South Sacramento across from Florin Road Bingo and the Rice Bowl restaurant, California State Senator Richard Pan (D-Sacramento) wanted his office located where people frequented.

From West Sacramento up to the Sacramento International Airport over to McClellan Air Force Base and southwest to the town of Sheldon down to Elk Grove, essentially all of Sacramento proper is included in Dr. Pan’s district but 2251 Florin Road, Suite 156 is where he settled.
And people are coming off the streets to pop in and talk. “It’s a good place to be. I want to be sure we serve all our neighborhoods. I am proud of the work of all of our neighborhoods,” Pan said.

Having worked for several nonprofits over the years from churches to food banks and nonprofit health clinics nearby, Florin Road is “one of the communities in my area that could use extra help,” he said.

Proud to be a convener bringing people together, Pan has held health fairs, kids’ health classes, has worked with food banks and helped summer lunch programs. “We work with (Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services), Senior Gleaners to continue to get food to people who need help. We’ve done a variety of things on the ground to help out,” he said.

First elected to the state Assembly in 2010, Pan has since authored legislation to bring more than $100 million in federal funds for fire departments, including $6 million for the Sacramento region. He partnered with law enforcement and local businesses to establish a statewide database to catch thieves attempting to sell stolen property to pawnshops, and he authored a law to allow campus police to use body cameras.

Time magazine called Dr. Pan a “hero” when he authored landmark legislation to abolish non-medical exemptions to legally required vaccines for school students.

Despite the recognition, activists attempted to recall Pan because of the vaccination law. In an article by Elk Grove Citizen’s Lance Armstrong, Katherine Duran, an Elk Grove mother, and a team of volunteers responded to that bill with an effort to have Pan recalled. According to the article, Duran stated that she felt that the bill represented a loss of “liberty or right to decide what doesn’t go into our bodies.”

Apparently even after the effort to recall was unsuccessful, in a recent interview with this publication Pan relayed further backlash that attacked an event where he brought together members of the Muslim and Japanese communities to talk about exclusionary rhetoric. “Anti-vaxxers came to protest outside, but they played a trick on the reporter. They claimed that I allowed hate speech (on my Facebook page). They showed the reporter these posts. There were three examples and each was less than an hour a part from another. One post was an anti-vaccine person who faked posting – ‘kill the anti-vaxxers. See, they’re threatening us too.’ We proved that one of the posts was an anti-vaccine Facebook person who pretended they were pro vaccine… it was bad.

“The reality is we have to keep our kids safe at school. We eliminated measles in 2000 and having all these cases pop up and being spread primarily around unvaccinated kids. Ten babies died of whooping cough and hundreds got sick.”

Now hiring: After recession, state government looking for workers
During the recession, the state essentially had a hiring freeze, but now that recovery has been underway, they’re hiring again. The need for employees also stems from those retiring.

Working with the state Department of Human Resources’ Civil Rights Commission, Pan reached out to minority groups to diversify the workplace and to fill the open positions. “A lot of people who live in less served communities don’t know the process,” he said.

Offering workshops on how to get a state job with such nonprofits as La Familia, and Asian Resources, a lot work needs to be done to get the attendees to come to exam. “We’re still in the middle of this. We want to be sure more people have opportunities to apply for these jobs … We need to be getting them to the exam.”

While there are companies that do this for a fee, reaching out to the underserved communities, Pan has been instrumental in making sure these workshops are free of charge.

Working with Elk Grove youth to create legislation affecting them
In February, Pan joined the 8th grade class at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Elementary School in Elk Grove in introducing Senate Bill 977, which would ban tobacco products within 250 feet from a youth sporting event.

“Youth sports is all about developing good and healthy habits,” he said. “Everyone on the field, bleachers and sidelines should be encouraging our young athletes to pick up life-long habits that will keep them healthy and strong. I am proud of the 8th grade class at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Elementary School for recognizing the importance of good health and working to make SB 977 state law.”

SB 977 would prohibit cigarettes, chewing tobacco, e-cigarettes and other tobacco products within 250 feet of any youth sports practice, game or other activity, where athletes under the age of 18 are present.

Data tracking system on violent deaths
Pan also announced that his bill SB 877, which will require California to establish and maintain a data-tracking system on violent deaths in the state, including gun deaths, passed the state senate.

“Researchers cannot fully confront the crisis and save lives because we lack research and tracking,” he explained.

“Databases are really important to figure ways to reduce injury and death. It also tells when things don’t work,” he added at the time of the interview. He said California used to participate and stopped for budget issues about 10 years ago. “Being someone in public health, I need to understand and (know) if solutions are making a difference.”

Prior to 2008, California participated in the National Violent Death Reporting System, a federal program to collect data on violent deaths. California was unable to obtain federal funding to continue the program because the state did not obtain law enforcement records required by NVDRS. SB 877 would require the California Department of Public Health to collect such data.

In addition to providing the data to the NVDRS, the data could be used to assist state policymakers and communities as they determine appropriate prevention and education efforts.

Researchers point to the difference in how guns and vehicle fatalities are tracked. In 1975, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration started a national database called the Fatality Analysis Reporting System. State, local and federal entities work together to update the database with detailed data sets for every car death in the nation. By contrast, a unified and complete database for gun deaths is virtually non-existent, explained Pan in a press release on the topic.

Researchers and policymakers have used the information to create safety mechanisms that have drastically reduced vehicle fatalities through the years. Meanwhile, gun deaths persist and in 21 states and the District of Columbia, gun deaths now outnumber vehicle deaths, Pan continued.

Also, in regard to Dr. Pan’s bill requiring California collect data on gun deaths, Pan reported that the following 32 states collect and participate in the National Violent Death Reporting System: Alaska, Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Utah, Virginia, Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin.