Ribbon cutting to celebrate new roadway: the Village Parkway North

Ribbon cutting to celebrate new roadway: the Village Parkway North

Roadway to improve traffic flow from Southport to the Tower Bridge Gateway The City of West Sacramento has completed the Village Parkway North connecting to South River Road (and the Mike McGowan More »

West Sacramento Fire Department Is A Class Act

West Sacramento Fire Department Is A Class Act

By Julia McMichael Effective Dec. 1, 2016, the Fire Department of West Sacramento will be upgraded by the Insurance Service Office (ISO) to a Class 1 rating. An ISO Class 1 fire More »

The Yolo Land Trust honors Clarksburg Farmer Greg Merwin at “A Day in the Country”

The Yolo Land Trust honors Clarksburg Farmer Greg Merwin at “A Day in the Country”

The Yolo Land Trust’s signature event “A Day in the Country” will be held this year on Sept. 11 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Barger Keasey Family Farm near Davis. More »


Confirmed Zika case in Yolo County

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed on Wednesday that a Yolo County resident has tested positive for Zika virus. This individual recently traveled out of the country and had a mild case of Zika.

Zika virus is a relatively new disease for the Western hemisphere. It first appeared in Brazil in May of 2015. It has since spread to 20 countries in Central and South America and the Caribbean, including Mexico. Zika is spread through mosquito bites, not casual person-to-person contact. According to the CDC, the most common symptoms are fever, rash, joint pain and red, itchy eyes. Symptoms are usually mild and last several days to a week. Many people who have Zika will not experience symptoms. There is currently no vaccine or treatment for Zika.

Pregnant women, however, are believed to be most at risk for complications from the Zika virus because serious birth defects have been reported in infants born to women infected with the virus. The CDC is planning studies to learn more about the connection between Zika and children born with these birth defects. In the meantime, the CDC has issued travel guidance for women who are pregnant or who may become pregnant. To stay up-to-date on the CDC’s latest travel notices, visit: http://www.cdc.gov/travel.

“Yolo County residents traveling to Central or South America or the Caribbean, where Zika is present, should take precautions against mosquitoes,” said Yolo County Health Officer Ron Chapman, MD, MPH. “If you are pregnant, consider postponing your trip. All travelers to areas where Zika is present should go to their doctor if they experience any of the symptoms associated with Zika within three to seven days after they return. Pregnant women who have recently traveled to an area with Zika should talk to a healthcare provider about their travel even if they don’t feel sick.”

Ways to avoid mosquito bites include:
Using an insect repellant containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535 or oil of lemon eucalyptus;
Wearing long-sleeved shirts and trousers;
Using air conditioning or window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside; and
Reducing the number of mosquitoes inside and outside your home by emptying standing water from containers such as flowerpots or buckets. Mosquitoes can breed in as little amount of water as a bottle cap.

On the web: www.cdc.gov/zika and www.cdph.ca.gov/HealthInfo/discond/Pages/Zika.aspx

RCHS senior Jaylen Crim signs letter of intent to play soccer at St. Mary’s

By Monica Stark

Out of a somewhat reserved River City High School senior, Jaylen Crim, come extreme talent and force on the soccer field. This week the varsity soccer forward signs off for St. Mary’s where she’s given a full ride scholarship to continue improving her game.
“She definitely will be missed when she’s gone. She helped the program take a turn,” head coach Kamal Singh said. “Since I’ve been here, she’s the first D1 scholar (the team has had).”
A member of the varsity team since she was a freshman, Jaylen has gotten the team to win more and more. “This is my 11th year at River City and the last five years started turning around once Jaylen and her crew came, her and four other girls, they definitely had a huge impact on the program.”
A very humble player with undeceiving speed, it’s as though Jaylen possesses an extra gear, Singh says. ”She can turn on that gear whenever she wants to … Over the years she scored some great goals. She’s won some games with her athletic ability for us. She’s a team player. She loves being a part of this team.”
One such game Jaylen describes as a highlight for her time thus far at River City was against Woodland High School last year when in the last three minutes she scored two goals, making the score 3-0. “They’re our biggest rivals,” she says.
In conditioning now for River City, Jaylen hopes to lead the team further than ever in the playoffs and she hopes to make the All City List. “I made it last year; to make it again would be good,” she said.
Having played club soccer for Sacramento United, which practices at Granite Park in Sacramento, since she was 8 years old, Jaylen has traveled all around California. “I played the majority of my games with them. I found a lot of coaches help me,” she said.
Excited to attend St. Mary’s and study kinesiology and eventually practice physical therapy, she said she likes the smaller feel of the college. “I went on my official visit in October and met all players coming in and with the ones that are there and we got to bond a little.”
At the sport since she was just 3 years old (4 years old on a team), Jaylen said her parents have been her primary inspiration. “They inspire me to do my best. When I was younger, they always wanted me to practice playing soccer.”

Congratulations to River City High School student Emily Xu

Emily Xu, River City High School student of Ms. Schroeder, received a Full Academic Scholarship to represent the State of California at the Congress of Future Medical Leaders, June 25-27 in Boston. That’s a $1,000 scholarship! Emily will witness surgeries and hear from the top medical experts in the country. Ms. Schroeder has had 15 students accepted in the past three years, but Emily is the first to receive a full scholarship. Congratulations to the both of you!

Hollywood comes to West Sacramento as the annual Father Daughter Dinner Dance turns 21

By Julia McMichael

Courtesy of the City of West Sacramento Parks and Recreation

Courtesy of the City of West Sacramento Parks and Recreation

Fathers and daughters of all ages are invited to a “Hollywood Ball,” either Friday, Feb. 19 or Saturday, Feb. 20, 6:30 to 9 p.m. This semi-formal “night to remember” comes with a dinner buffet, a DJ and dancing in the beautiful Galleria of the West Sacramento Civic Center, 1110 West Capitol Ave. “Prom”-style photos will be available for an additional fee. Space is limited! There will be no assigned seating. Registration: fathers $45, daughter(s) $25 each, daughter(s) age 3 and younger are free. Registration is now open. First come, first served. For more information, call the Parks & Recreation Dept., (916) 617-5320.
This event is a tradition in West Sacramento since 1995. Event coordinator, Lucy Ramos says “a major goal of the Parks and Recreation Department is to strengthen families. This event furthers that mission. We see grandfathers, uncles and men of all ages step up to escort girls and women of all ages to a fun night. We have ages from three to 70, a wide range. All are welcome.”
The Center for Fathers and Families advocate spending time with children. “Kids spell love T-I-M-E. Dr. Ken Canfield of the National Center for Fathering says, “Such time and attention helps prevent girls from seeking romantic attention from men.” “The Importance of Fathers” booklet says that “Fathers are a child’s guide to the outside world.”
A Great Night for Divorced or Separated Dads
Linda Nielsen, the author of Between Fathers & Daughters: Enriching and Rebuilding Your Adult Relationship says, “In a divorced family, there are many ways a father-daughter bond may suffer. Based on her research, Dr. Linda Nielsen found that only 10 to 15 percent of fathers get to enjoy the benefits of shared parenting after divorce. What a girl needs is a loving, predictable father figure — whether married to her mother, single, or divorced.” A night out one to one can provide meaningful attention for a girl.
In his recent book “Always Dad”, Paul Mandelstein, advises divorced dads to find ways to play a crucial role in their daughter’s life. He suggests that the father-daughter connection, even several years after a family dissolves, is heavily influenced by consistency in contact and the quality of the relationship.
According to psychologist Kevin Leman, fathers are the key to their daughter’s future. “That evidence shows that a father’s relationship with his daughter is one of the key determinants in a woman’s ability to enjoy a successful life and marriage.”
For21 years, this dinner dance has been a tradition in West Sacramento. Maybe it’s time to make it a tradition in your family.

What fathers and daughters say:
“I took my daughter to the father-daughter dance and I cried like a little baby. She’s 11 years old, so seeing her get dressed up and pretty made me cry.” Kevin Hart
“My Daddy was my hero. He was always there for me when I needed him. He listened to me and taught me so many things. But most of all he was fun.” Bindi Irwin
“We love it!” Joshua Stark
“I went a few years ago with my dad, and my husband took our daughter. Now my husband takes her and I don’t attend.” Becky Olson
“I want my hubby to take our little girl. I think she is at the right age to appreciate it! I want him to start teacher her how a gentleman should act and for her to learn how a little lady should too. This will be a magical memory!” Natalie Ramirez-Loftin
“My husband and daughter have gone to the dance for the last 7 years an plan on going again in February. They love it!!! I have pictures from each year!” Michelle Turner-Mayer

The Father/Daughter Bond:

1. A father teaches his daughter that it is not necessary to choose between being strong and delicate. She can be both at the same time.
2. He is the first man she looks up to and he totally brings out the best in her.
3. Dads make their daughters take risks to build self-confidence.
4. He gives her the confidence to do things on her own and become independent. For example, he pushes her to learn to ride a bicycle and drive the car.
5. When it comes to careers, a father is the first person every daughter goes to for proper guidance and advice. They never stop their daughters from aiming high, but also give them a taste of reality by sharing their experiences.
6. Sports, extracurricular activities, hobby classes — they encourage their daughters for anything and everything. They know this will only make their daughters grow as an individual.
7. Fathers have a cool way to expose the outer world to their daughters: Family vacations, outings and adventure camps.This is their way of letting their daughters know how big the world is.
8. Daughters observe their fathers strength to take up responsibilities and their soft side that cares about the family.

Artwork for Joey Lopes Park

By Thomas Farley

The art installation for Joey Lopes Park will be a knock-out. The City Council voted on Wednesday, Jan. 13 to accept a design from nationally known artist Michael Clapper of Denver, Colorado. He beat out over 75 submissions. There were no artist submissions from West Sacramento. Commissioners from the City of West Sacramento’s Arts, Culture & Historic Preservation Commission weighed in on the decision as well as the Yolo Arts Council, City staff, an outside artist, and a landscape architect. The artwork will cost $70,000, less than two percent of the budget to build the new park off of West Capitol.

Joey Lopes was a hometown boxer who fought in the late 1940s and throughout the 1950s. At many times he competed at the Memorial Auditorium across the river. In his early career he was selected for the 1948 U.S. Olympics boxing team. He went on to fight three times for the World Lightweight crown. A community leader in retirement, Lopes did work for the West Sacramento Sanitary District, the West Sacramento Optimist Club and the West Sacramento Babe Ruth Baseball League. It was only natural that a park be named after him, and just as naturally a fitting tribute to him in art would be constructed.

As solid as the boxer and community steward himself, the stone and steel artwork will show Lopes at the height of his powers, in profile, reaching out to deliver a punch. The metal’s rusty finish connects with his blue-collar roots, the son of a grocer, fighting his way toward the top of his sport. Where did the ideas and inspiration come from to produce such a design?

Michael Clapper says he drew on materials supplied to him by the Yolo Arts Council and the West Sacramento Historical Society. But as with all of his projects, he did his own independent research as well, even taking to watching old Joey Lopes fights now on YouTube. Along the way, Clapper said he could identify with Lopes rise from a working-class neighborhood, as he did from north-east industrial Ohio, the first in his family to graduate from college.

A collaborative effort, Clapper’s team includes an engineer, a graphics company, a water-jet shop that cuts steel, and even an electrician to provide the installation’s night-lighting. As this article goes to print, the artwork’s stone is being brought from Kansas to Clapper’s studio. Preparations are underway to meet a tight deadline, with late May the hoped for completion date. Clapper wants West Sacramento to know that he is proud and pleased to be selected as the champion for Lopes’ tribute and hopes that it will embody the boxer and civic leader’s spirit: fighting for community.

The Sail Inn is Back in Port

By Thomas Farley

The Sail Inn on Jefferson Boulevard is being reopened and rechristened as the Sail Inn Grotto & Bar. Launch date is late February. All aboard.

The old Sail Inn, its full name The Sail Inn Food and Spirits, has been closed since August, 2013. That’s when Joan Washburn lost her lease to run the place, which she had been doing since 1986.

The Sail Inn was a family owned property of the Kristoffs, best known for Bill Kristoff, the longest-serving member of the West Sacramento City Council. The new restaurant and bar retains a Kristoff family member, Ellie Marie, but now includes Archie Morse as the chief owner. The new management team also has equity in the business.

A West Sacramento landmark, The Sail, as it was simply known to most folks, was a working-class bar that served good food and made people feel welcome. A port of call for many on a long Friday night, the bar appealed beyond its State Streets location to the greater Sacramento area. Although the exterior may have been rough, the bathrooms small and scary, the Harleys parked outside intimidating, few places exuded a greater charm for after work, after a River Cats’ game, or after the kids were left with the sitter. The new managers understand this.

The Sail’s operating team are Garrett Van Vleck, Jason Boggs and Alex Origoni. They are behind the wildly successful and nationally recognized Shady Lady Saloon across the river. Van Vleck used to go to the Sail Inn. “I went there several times. In renovating the place, I think we kept a lot of the old roadhouse feel and the basic nautical theme, but we cleaned it up considerably and brought everything up to code. I hope the people in West Sac will appreciate the transformation and enjoy the nod to what it used to be.” He says there will be a varied cocktail menu and surf food to complement the sea-faring theme.

So when does the party start? “I think we should be open near the end of February. We are still debating the exact night time hours. We’ll probably stay open until midnight on the weekdays and 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. Possibly open at 11 a.m. for lunch and keep serving food until about 10 p.m. at night. We may have some live music and DJs occasionally but no juke box or karaoke. There also won’t be a pool table but we are still discussing the possibility of some bar games.”

The Sail Inn’s transformation may change its looks but not its destination to good times. Instead of a tramp steamer, perhaps West Sacramento will have a boutique cruise ship with a good living attitude. And a Mai Tai. All aboard.

Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye, Chief Justice of California, Named Guest Speaker for the 2016 Yolo County Women’s History Month Luncheon

Cantil-SakauyeThe Yolo County Women’s History Month Committee has announced Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye, Chief Justice of California, as its guest speaker for the 29th annual Women’s History Month luncheon scheduled for Thursday, March 10, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Woodland Community & Senior Center, 2001 East Street, Woodland.
Chief Justice Tani Gorre Cantil-Sakauye is the 28th Chief Justice of the State of California. She was sworn into office on Jan. 3, 2011 and is the first Asian-Filipina American and the second woman to serve as the state’s chief justice.
Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye was nominated to office in July 2010, unanimously confirmed by the Commission on Judicial Appointments in August 2010, and
overwhelmingly approved by voters in the November 2010 general election. At the time she was nominated as Chief Justice, she had served more than 20 years on California trial and appellate courts, including six years on the Court of Appeal, Third Appellate District, in Sacramento. As Chief Justice she also chairs the Judicial Council of California, the administrative policymaking body of state courts, and the Commission on Judicial Appointments.
A Sacramento native, Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye attended C. K. McClatchy High School and Sacramento City College before graduating with honors from the University of California, Davis, later receiving her JD from the UC Davis, Martin Luther King, Jr., School of Law.
She worked as a deputy district attorney for the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office, and then served on the senior staff of Governor Deukmejian, first as deputy legal affairs secretary and later as a deputy legislative secretary. 
Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye is a former board member of several nonprofit organizations and has been active in numerous professional community organizations, including membership in the California Judges Association, the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association, and the Sacramento Asian Bar Association, and received the Filipina of the Year Award. She is married to Mark Sakauye, a retired police lieutenant and they have two daughters.
The theme for the 2016 luncheon is “Working to Form a More Perfect Union: Honoring Women in Public Service and Government” and honors women who have shaped America’s history and its future through their public service and government leadership.
The luncheon will be catered by Anderson Family Catering & BBQ of Winters and the cost for the luncheon is $25. For reservations, make checks payable to WHM, and mail to WHM, P.O. Box 711, Woodland, CA 95776. Payment by credit card may be made online at www.ycwhm.org. Reservations and payment must be received by Friday, March 4, 2016, and reservations will not be sold at the door.
For general information about the luncheon, please contact Katherine Mawdsley at
530-758-5093 or Louisa R. Vessell at 916-451-2113 / lvessell@sbcglobal.net / 916-799-9932; or visit www.ycwhm.org.
The Yolo County Women’s History Month Committee is a California non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation. Please refer to website for sponsorship opportunities. Proceeds from the event will benefit the public libraries in Yolo County for the purchase of women’s history materials.