Woodland Tomato Festival comes downtown on Aug. 13

Woodland Tomato Festival comes downtown on Aug. 13

Once again it’s the time of year when fresh tomatoes are center stage, sparking a new energy throughout Yolo County. Monster machines bounce through dusty fields heaping 25-ton capacity trailers with another More »

The Barn celebrates with first major event with Off the Grid

The Barn celebrates with first major event with Off the Grid

The Barn kicked off its weekly Friday night Off the Grid food truck and music event with large crowds on Friday, Aug. 5. Located at 985 Riverfront Street, the Barn is a More »

Quilts for Community Service

Quilts for Community Service

The Delta Piecemakers Quilt Guild has donated handmade quilts to the West Sacramento Police and Fire Departments to be given out to those in need of comfort during police or fire calls. More »

 

The Sail Inn is Back in Port

By Thomas Farley
thomasfarley@yahoo.com

The Sail Inn on Jefferson Boulevard is being reopened and rechristened as the Sail Inn Grotto & Bar. Launch date is late February. All aboard.

The old Sail Inn, its full name The Sail Inn Food and Spirits, has been closed since August, 2013. That’s when Joan Washburn lost her lease to run the place, which she had been doing since 1986.

The Sail Inn was a family owned property of the Kristoffs, best known for Bill Kristoff, the longest-serving member of the West Sacramento City Council. The new restaurant and bar retains a Kristoff family member, Ellie Marie, but now includes Archie Morse as the chief owner. The new management team also has equity in the business.

A West Sacramento landmark, The Sail, as it was simply known to most folks, was a working-class bar that served good food and made people feel welcome. A port of call for many on a long Friday night, the bar appealed beyond its State Streets location to the greater Sacramento area. Although the exterior may have been rough, the bathrooms small and scary, the Harleys parked outside intimidating, few places exuded a greater charm for after work, after a River Cats’ game, or after the kids were left with the sitter. The new managers understand this.

The Sail’s operating team are Garrett Van Vleck, Jason Boggs and Alex Origoni. They are behind the wildly successful and nationally recognized Shady Lady Saloon across the river. Van Vleck used to go to the Sail Inn. “I went there several times. In renovating the place, I think we kept a lot of the old roadhouse feel and the basic nautical theme, but we cleaned it up considerably and brought everything up to code. I hope the people in West Sac will appreciate the transformation and enjoy the nod to what it used to be.” He says there will be a varied cocktail menu and surf food to complement the sea-faring theme.

So when does the party start? “I think we should be open near the end of February. We are still debating the exact night time hours. We’ll probably stay open until midnight on the weekdays and 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday. Possibly open at 11 a.m. for lunch and keep serving food until about 10 p.m. at night. We may have some live music and DJs occasionally but no juke box or karaoke. There also won’t be a pool table but we are still discussing the possibility of some bar games.”

The Sail Inn’s transformation may change its looks but not its destination to good times. Instead of a tramp steamer, perhaps West Sacramento will have a boutique cruise ship with a good living attitude. And a Mai Tai. All aboard.

Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye, Chief Justice of California, Named Guest Speaker for the 2016 Yolo County Women’s History Month Luncheon

Cantil-SakauyeThe Yolo County Women’s History Month Committee has announced Tani G. Cantil-Sakauye, Chief Justice of California, as its guest speaker for the 29th annual Women’s History Month luncheon scheduled for Thursday, March 10, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Woodland Community & Senior Center, 2001 East Street, Woodland.
Chief Justice Tani Gorre Cantil-Sakauye is the 28th Chief Justice of the State of California. She was sworn into office on Jan. 3, 2011 and is the first Asian-Filipina American and the second woman to serve as the state’s chief justice.
Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye was nominated to office in July 2010, unanimously confirmed by the Commission on Judicial Appointments in August 2010, and
overwhelmingly approved by voters in the November 2010 general election. At the time she was nominated as Chief Justice, she had served more than 20 years on California trial and appellate courts, including six years on the Court of Appeal, Third Appellate District, in Sacramento. As Chief Justice she also chairs the Judicial Council of California, the administrative policymaking body of state courts, and the Commission on Judicial Appointments.
A Sacramento native, Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye attended C. K. McClatchy High School and Sacramento City College before graduating with honors from the University of California, Davis, later receiving her JD from the UC Davis, Martin Luther King, Jr., School of Law.
She worked as a deputy district attorney for the Sacramento County District Attorney’s Office, and then served on the senior staff of Governor Deukmejian, first as deputy legal affairs secretary and later as a deputy legislative secretary. 
Chief Justice Cantil-Sakauye is a former board member of several nonprofit organizations and has been active in numerous professional community organizations, including membership in the California Judges Association, the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association, and the Sacramento Asian Bar Association, and received the Filipina of the Year Award. She is married to Mark Sakauye, a retired police lieutenant and they have two daughters.
The theme for the 2016 luncheon is “Working to Form a More Perfect Union: Honoring Women in Public Service and Government” and honors women who have shaped America’s history and its future through their public service and government leadership.
The luncheon will be catered by Anderson Family Catering & BBQ of Winters and the cost for the luncheon is $25. For reservations, make checks payable to WHM, and mail to WHM, P.O. Box 711, Woodland, CA 95776. Payment by credit card may be made online at www.ycwhm.org. Reservations and payment must be received by Friday, March 4, 2016, and reservations will not be sold at the door.
For general information about the luncheon, please contact Katherine Mawdsley at
530-758-5093 or Louisa R. Vessell at 916-451-2113 / lvessell@sbcglobal.net / 916-799-9932; or visit www.ycwhm.org.
The Yolo County Women’s History Month Committee is a California non-profit 501(c)(3) corporation. Please refer to website for sponsorship opportunities. Proceeds from the event will benefit the public libraries in Yolo County for the purchase of women’s history materials.

Shores of Hope partnered with Raley’s Food for Families to provide food to West Sac families

On Saturday, Jan. 16, Shores of Hope served families in need and distributed more than 300 bags of groceries thanks to a partnership with the Raley’s Food for Families program. The line opened at 9 a.m. and took place at Shores of Hope, 110 6th St. This distribution program named, Shores of Hope’s Groceries for Families, started in December where 300 bags of groceries were distributed within the first hour to West Sacramento families who visited the center located in the neighborhood of historic Broderick.
“I found out about this at the social services office” explained one of the recipients waiting in line at the December distribution. “I’m very thankful for this help.”
Such sentiments were echoed by many of the recipients coming from all over West Sacramento and expressed in English, Spanish and Russian.
Food For Families is a non-profit program that has raised more than $22 million and donated more than 12 million pounds of groceries to food banks in our communities since the program began as a holiday food drive in 1986. Shores of Hope shares the view of Raley’s Food for Families whose aim is to end hunger locally by providing fresh and healthy food to those who need it the most and getting real food to real families.
“I think Raley’s Food for Families chose Shores of Hope because of our connection with this community,” shares Shores of Hope Sergei Shkurkin. “The amount of families we serve in West Sacramento is perfect for the distribution of grocery bags full of food provided by Food for Families’ partners, such as Best Foods and Ben & Jerry’s, and the many donations given by local individuals who believe in the mission.”
Shores of Hope has been rebuilding the lives of those in need throughout the Sacramento Region since it began in 1920 as the United Christian Center and as the former Broderick Christian Center since 1952. The name change to Shores of Hope in October 2015 marks the growth of the center from a formal religious ministry to an organization that continues to offer service and hope to those mired in social crisis.

For more information, visit www.shoresofhope.org, call 837-9050 or email at sergeishkurkin@shoresofhope.org.

Planting Seeds for the Future: River City High School Farm Program Students Harness the Power of Food

By Bia Riaz
bia@news-ledger.com

Five years ago, a very important seed was planted at River City High School’s after school Greenhouse and Gardens Club. Under guidance of teachers like Ellen Hoffman (retired), and Jennifer McAllister (AP Biology), students learned and shared the values of nurturing and caring for plant life. This love of gardening bloomed into the Farm to Fork Program and Pathway.
The energy and excitement exhibited by the students prompted the school to ask Ms. McAllister to write a course outline and develop a curriculum for the Farm to Fork Program. The first Farm to Fork class started in the spring 2015 term.
Initially, students were placed in the class and had to become familiar with the concept, as it related to their day-to-day lives. McAllister also reached out to parents about the program. Once the students understood the impact of growing and eating seasonal and healthy ingredients, they were motivated to continue the pathway and signed up for additional classes. The pathway for the program offers students the opportunity to learn and understand agriculture and the properties of soil, fertilizers, carbon, nitrogen, water, and the concept of seasonal crops.
As part of the program, the Farm to Fork students participate in planting and caring for the RCHS urban garden located on the school grounds. The most recent crops in the garden include; garlic, onions, beets, radishes, carrots, collards, broccoli, and many more. In the class, students learn how to plant, harvest, wash and pack the produce from the garden. All the produce is then provided to the school cafeteria. The cafeteria at RCHS focuses on developing lunches using the produce in conjunction with other locally sourced ingredients.
According to McAllister, the program has generated a lot of lively discussion in the classroom. The students have developed an understanding of how their food is grown, where it comes from, and the economic issues related to cost and production. “They raised the issue of equality and access to healthy food. They find it frustrating that healthy food is expensive, but they also understand the triple bottom line. You have to have a quality environment, you have to care for the people and animals, but you still need to make a profit. They understand that quality food costs more” Observed McAllister.
Last year the class had the opportunity to visit the Bryte Garden Caffe (Culinary Arts and Food Education) site and learned how to incorporate fresh produce, like pumpkins, into a scratch made pie. They also attended the Farm-to-Fork Festival and the First Harvest Festival. McAllister mentioned that the students were excited to share information and learn more about the Farm to Fork movement in the region. Several students have already volunteered to return to the festival next year.
Although it started as a small class, the interest in the program has grown and more students are requesting enrollment in the classes. Currently, there are 37 students in the Farm to Fork class. On February 9th, the students will be visiting the Fiery Ginger Farm, behind Yolo High School, to experience a working local urban farm. As a teacher at RCHS for 20 years, McAllister expressed how much she enjoyed working with the students. “It is inspiring to see young people get excited about learning. They understand and care about eating healthy. They also understand that they ‘vote’ every time they choose to eat healthy. They let the corporations know, they choose healthy!”
For more on the RCHS Farm to Fork Program, visit their website http://rivercity.wusd.k12.ca.us/farmtoforks

A historic firehouse reborn

By Thomas Farley
thomasfarley@yahoo.com

The old Washington District firehouse at 317 Third St. is being reborn as a bar and restaurant. The once neglected landmark sits at the foot of the I Street Bridge, its renewal just part of the revitalizing Bridge District. The News-Ledger reached out to Bay Miry with D&S Development who answered several questions about the pioneering urban project.

What attracted you to this venture?
Our team has a passion for the rehab of historic buildings. We have always had our eye on the Washington Firehouse building and the historic Washington/Broderick area in general. The building has great charm and character both on the interior and exterior and we are working with full force to bring it to life. A number of events are all coming together to help align the starts for that specific area to become the next “hot” urban hub including: the improved economy, the influx of housing, the addition of tenants like “Edible Pedal” in our historic strip center across the street, and planned infrastructure improvements in the near future including replacement of the I Street Bridge so that it leads directly into the railyard redevelopment.

Have you changed the original design which called for a live/work space on the second floor?
Yes. The upstairs area will instead include a second bar area and second expansive outdoor patio and we envision it will be used as a private dining space for special events and catering. One thing we heard loud and clear from the community and city staff is the need for both a neighborhood friendly restaurant as well as a special events space in that area.

Has the West Sacramento Historical Society been consulted?
Yes, we have indeed engaged them to share our plans and get feedback on our intentions and specifically on how we envision bringing the building back to life and magnifying its existing charms. We are working to incorporate the historical society’s historic fire truck, the “Old Mary”, into the space planning. We also are working with the society on obtaining photos and history that we can showcase in the space as a way to pay homage to the history of both the surrounding area and the building itself.

Estimated time of completion?
We hope to both complete construction and have an operator in place and open for business by the end of the year, if not sooner. Construction continues to move along smoothly. There was the addition of a new building on the rear of the historic building and we are working through all structural rehab and rough work right now.

Any inquiries from potential users?
About a half dozen legitimate inquiries but we are being pretty picky about who we ultimately select for the building; we want to make sure we have an experienced operator in there that is providing the community with quality food and service.

Anything else a West Sacramento resident should know?
The rehab of historic buildings is important to our team. These “gems” should be showcased and brought back to life whenever possible. What makes this project even more exciting at least for us is the positive impact it will have on the surrounding community and that it happens to be occurring at the same time as other key factors that together will bring exciting urban activity and energy to that immediate area. A lot of folks have expressed their excitement that something is being done with this building and that they appreciate the fact that there are real things for them to look forward to as far as that area is concerned in the immediate future.

Butane honey oil lab found on Kinsington Street

By Monica Stark
editor@news-ledger.com

At about 2 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 13, an officer detained eight suspects located in a residence of a butane honey oil lab on Kinsington Street. The lab consisted of a glass extraction vessel, numerous cans of butane, pounds of marijuana shake, stems, buds, two pumps, methamphetamine and methamphetamine pipes. After investigation, it was determined that five of the eight contacted could not be tied directly to the butane honey oil lab or any criminal behavior.
In one of the bedrooms, the officer located marijuana shake stem and buds, extraction vessel and pumps, methamphetamine and two glass meth pipes. The individual who resides in that bedroom was arrested for charges related to those violations. In another bedroom, the officer located Xanax in an unmarked Rx bottle, methamphetamine, a meth pipe, butane, marijuana shake stem and buds, and a digital scale. Two individuals who reside in that bedroom were arrested for charges related to those violations.
In the third bedroom, a marijuana shake stem and bud and a minor amount of finished butane honey oil was found.
It was later found that three suspects were hiding inside the attic. After numerous announcements, the West Sacramento Police Department was preparing to deploy the K-9 when two of the suspects made their presence known. They were taken into custody at that time. Everyone but the third suspect was arrested for manufacturing the butane honey oil.
Based on the officer’s training and experience, the extraction vessel, combined with butane, pumps and a quantity of marijuana is consistent with manufacturing of butane honey oil, a dangerous combination.

A new brewery to open in West Sacramento with intention of hiring low-income staff

By Monica Stark
Editor@news-ledger.com

A new brewery, called Revision Brewing, will open in West Sacramento with the intention of hiring low-income staff after the West Sacramento City Council on Wednesday, Jan. 13, approved his application to the State of California Community Development Block Grant Over-the-Counter Program.
At the meeting, Revision Brewing owner Jeremy Warren addressed the council with the following statement: “We are excited to be able to come to West Sacramento and build a very large state-of-the-art brewing facility that will not only have high recognition in the state of California but also on a national level. We kind of like the approach that you have in the city, being a mosaic. Just want to take the time to say hi.”
The council authorized an amount of a CDBG business loan not to exceed $330,000 to Revision Brewing Company. According to background analysis by Louise Collis, city of West Sacramento senior program manager, the city of West Sacramento receives U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) CDBG funding from the State of California Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD).
Warren said he found out about the CDBG from the cities of West Sacramento and Auburn. “I used the CDBG program for my previous company Knee Deep Brewing Company in Auburn and when I left they were helpful in referring other cities that might be able to offer the program. I decided to apply for the CDBG as I feel it is great program that assists in hiring low income employees and it helps in creating additional jobs. Without the grant we would have hired fewer employees.,” he said.
Collis’ staff report states that all CDBG funds must be used for projects that address at least one of the three CDBG national objectives:
1) Benefit Low-income households, defined as households at or below 80 percent of area median
household income for Yolo County;
2) the elimination of slums and blight related to physical structures such as homes or commercial
buildings; or
3) Urgent need, which refers to emergencies such as earthquake or flood damage.
According to background analysis by Collis, Revision Brewing Company LLC was formed in August 2015 by Warren, founder and former brewmaster of Knee Deep Brewing Company in Auburn, in partnership with James (Jeb) Taylor.
Revision planned on opening a craft microbrewery and tap room at 825 F St., on the western border of the Washington District, but that location didn’t pan out, noting that they have found several alternatives.
“Right know we don’t want to disclose the locations of the two buildings we are looking at. We did submit LOI’s (letter of intent) to the locations this morning and are waiting to hear back from them. Once we have a signed LOI, I can disclose the locations… In regards to the F street location, we were going back and forth with LOI negotiations and last minute the owners of the building decided to sell the build and felt that the brewery lease would be detrimental to the sale of the building,” Warren said in a written statement.
According to her Collis’ report, the owners of Revision Brewing have a loyal following not just in Sacramento, but across the Western U.S. and East Coast States. A dozen distributors have indicated interest in carrying Revision products. Revision anticipates producing 1,200 barrels in the first year, increasing to 10,000 barrels within five years. Projected revenues are $2 million in 2017, increasing to $4 million by 2019. The total project is expected to cost $1.3 million. Revision Brewing has applied for a $400,000 SBA loan from Community Business Bank and have requested a $330,000 CDBG loan. With the SBA and CDBG financing, they will be able to purchase sufficient brewing equipment to produce quantities needed for interested distributors.
The remaining cost will be paid by the owners. Fulfilling the demands of distributors and staffing the taproom will require the hiring of 13 new employees (11 full-time employee positions) during the first year of operation and Revision anticipates a staff of 25 within four years. At least seven of the initial new hires must be from low-income households. The city’s loan will be secured against the equipment purchased with CDBG funds and with personal guarantees from the business owners. The city currently has a balance of $443,951 in CDBG program income which is dedicated to the completion of the West Gateway Place project and to Bryte Park Phase 2. Additional program income for business loans is not available at this time.