Tag Archives: branch

West Sac’s college branch celebrates five years, lays plans to expand

Local college branch: five years old & hoping to grow  (News-Ledger photo)

Local college branch: five years old & hoping to grow (News-Ledger photo)

NEWS-LEDGER — FEB 4, 2015 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

With public speakers, cookies and a martial arts performance, West Sacramento’s branch of Sacramento City College celebrated five years on West Capitol Avenue last Thursday afternoon.

The branch’s success, and the partnerships that helped bring that success, were themes of the day.

Mayor Christopher Cabaldon noted that the college took a gamble on building the new center when demand for community college classes in West Sacramento was unproven. Previously, the college had only offered a limited number of classes in this city in borrowed classrooms. And the branch also took a gamble by choosing a site on troubled West Capitol Avenue – on a stretch that’s now partially redeveloped near city hall.

Cabaldon said the college’s leadership decided, “We’re going to open a new center – we’re going to double-down, triple down.”

And from the city’s point of view:

“We anchored our entire downtown, which didn’t exist, to this facility.”

Now the 1000-block of West Capitol includes the college, city hall, a transit center, community center and nearby library.

Mary Leland, an administrator at the college as well as a West Sacramento school board member, noted the “extraordinary partnerships” involved in the city’s college, school system and city programs.

The college’s local presence started in 1999 with three classrooms and a computer lab on Halyard Drive.

In 2010, it moved into its new three-story building at 1115 West Capitol Avenue, with 11 classrooms, a computer lab, and expanded course offerings. It combined with the college’s Downtown Center and serves about 2,600 students, according to its dean, Art Pimental.

ART PIMENTAL Dean of the West Sacramento branch of Sac City College (News-Ledger photo)

ART PIMENTAL
Dean of the West Sacramento branch of Sac City College
(News-Ledger photo)

“Roughly about 30 percent of our student body have West Sacramento addresses,” Pimental later told the News-Ledger. He also outlined the center’s expansion plans:

“Basically, the plans are to have two additional facilities here at the site,” said Pimental. “Two additional phases. At final buildout, the site will be approximately 80,000 square feet. The current facility is 25,000 square feet.

A 2008 state bond measure may help pay for Phase II.

“The district has approximately $5 million towards Phase II from Measure M,” Pimental explained. “Phase II will cost approximately $12 million.”

So building it will depend partly on help from state bond funds as well as continued enrollment growth. Best case scenario is that construction starts in 2017.

The new facility would be built next to the current structure, on a grassy area to the west close to Carol’s restaurant.  As for Phase III: there is no timeline yet, but construction would occur on the northern, parking-lot side of the current facility.

The next phase would allow the branch to serve more students, build a “wet lab,” and offer new courses that “reflect the needs of the community,” said Pimental.

A planned streetcar line coming to the site from across the Tower Bridge can only help with the branch’s success, he added.

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2015

 

Food Bank now collecting at West Sacramento library branch

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

The Yolo County Library system is helping to collect food for the Yolo Food Bank throughout the summer. This year’s goal is to collect 2,000 pounds. You may drop off non-perishable foods at the Arthur F. Turner Branch Library, 1212 Merkley Avenue in West Sacramento, as well as other branches in the county and the library administration center, 226 Buckeye Street in Woodland.

Visit www.yolocountylibrary.org.

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Civic honors for local brewpub, community college branch and more

  Bike Dog Brewery -- a minipub founded by several employees of a regional government agency -- received a city award for improving the town’s community pride. Mayor Christopher Cabaldon touted the founders as an example of entrepreneurship, as well as an example of a local government success story. City staff adjusted local zoning laws to help the brewery happen.   Pictured from left are Mayor Christopher Cabaldon, Council Member Beverly Sandeen, and brewery co-founder A.J. Tendick with his colleagues (News-Ledger photo)

Bike Dog Brewery — a minipub founded by several employees of a regional government agency — received a city award for improving the town’s community pride. Mayor Christopher Cabaldon touted the founders as an example of entrepreneurship, as well as an example of a local government success story. City staff adjusted local zoning laws to help the brewery happen.
Pictured from left are Mayor Christopher Cabaldon, Council Member Beverly Sandeen, and brewery co-founder A.J. Tendick with his colleagues (News-Ledger photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JUNE 4, 2014 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

The annual “State of the City” address on May 21 lacked any major new public policy announcements. But it did offer some perspective on sweeping changes now working their way through a growing West Sacramento.

In his keynote address to the dinner crowd inside city hall, Mayor Christopher Cabaldon touted several current achievements as well as some on the horizon. Plans to replace the old I Street Bridge are truly underway, he said. And the new urban farm on C Street is an example of paying homage to the city’s identity as a planned “food hub” as well as an example of using “infill” land for new purposes.

West Sacramento’s current building boom is not one that looks outward, said Cabaldon. It’s a boom taking place within current boundaries.

He talked about the city’s new growth spurt, bringing new urban development to the riverfront and “Bridge District” area north of the freeway. Alongside Raley Field are coming new housing, shopping and businesses.

“Our last great boom was mainly played out in Southport,” Cabaldon told the crowd. “This is a significant change in the center of gravity to our community, returning us to our roots. This is a waterfront city, with deep roots connecting us to our sister city across the river.”

The new boom is now occurring along that river, he said.

  Mayor Cabaldon and City Councilman Mark Johannessen flank Don Palm, dean of the West Sacramento and Davis branches of Sacramento City College. The local branch received the city’s “prosperity” award at the ‘State of the City’ dinner.  (News-Ledger photo)

Mayor Cabaldon and City Councilman Mark Johannessen flank Don Palm, dean of the West Sacramento and Davis branches of Sacramento City College. The local branch received the city’s “prosperity” award at the ‘State of the City’ dinner. (News-Ledger photo)

While helping to present a civic award to the local branch of Sacramento City College (just across the street from West Sacramento city hall) Cabaldon commented on the local jobs picture.

“Our unemployment is at a six year low,” said the mayor. “However, our unemployment rate is still way too high. . . It isn’t for lack of jobs. West Sacramento has more jobs than it has adults, by far.”

But there’s a “mismatch in still sets,” he said. “That’s why the West Sacramento campus is so fundamental to the future of our community, and to economic opportunities in our city.”

  Representatives of Northern California Construction Training, a West-Sac based nonprofit, pose with Mayor Cabaldon (left) and Councilman Ledesma (right). The construction group earned a city award for “service” to the community. The organization trains people for the construction trade and often participates in projects that benefit the community.   (News-Ledger photo)

Representatives of Northern California Construction Training, a West-Sac based nonprofit, pose with Mayor Cabaldon (left) and Councilman Ledesma (right). The construction group earned a city award for “service” to the community. The organization trains people for the construction trade and often participates in projects that benefit the community. (News-Ledger photo)

  Maria Simas (center) with Mayor Cabaldon and Councilman Bill Kristoff.   Simas accepted a civic award for “community” on behalf of the West Sacramento Foundation.   The Foundation has raised tens of thousands of dollars for local organizations through an annual golf tournament, the All Charities Raffle and other events. (News-Ledger photo)

Maria Simas (center) with Mayor Cabaldon and Councilman Bill Kristoff.
Simas accepted a civic award for “community” on behalf of the West Sacramento Foundation.
The Foundation has raised tens of thousands of dollars for local organizations through an annual golf tournament, the All Charities Raffle and other events. (News-Ledger photo)

Cabaldon also issued one dire warning for the evening. While he said he opposed the governor’s “tunnel” project to send water to the south state, Cabaldon maintained that at least one “tunnel” alternative was even worse.

The mayor talked about what he called the “Garamendi option,” which would pump Sacramento River water through the locks into the Port of West Sacramento’s channel, sending it down the canal as a first step in a journey to Southern California. That option would entail construction of a massive pumphouse near the locks, on the city’s valued riverfront. And, since water from the channel would be considered a drinking water source, it would necessarily lead to the closure of the port to ship traffic, he said.

This plan would be “a stake to the heart” of West Sacramento, said the mayor.

The “State of the City” dinner event was sponsored by the West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce.

 

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

 

‘Tour de West Sac’ citizens poke around some city hot spots on two wheels

CHRIS LEDESMA (towards right, with dark shirt) makes a point about the Michael McGowan Bridge now under construction on South River Road. The bridge will first connect South River Road, and later connect with Village Parkway in Southport. (News-Ledger photo)

CHRIS LEDESMA (towards right, with dark shirt) makes a point about the Michael McGowan Bridge now under construction on South River Road. The bridge will first connect South River Road, and later connect with Village Parkway in Southport. Click to enlarge.  (News-Ledger photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JUNE 4, 2014 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

Close to 50 people joined West Sacramento city councilman Chris Ledesma on Saturday, May 31, for the “Tour de West Sac,” an informal bike tour of some of the town’s new and soon-to-be-new highlights.

The group departed from Nugget market in Southport. Using the Clarksburg Branch Line Trail and local roads, they visited the bridge now under construction on South River Road, the Bridge District, Broderick restaurant, Sycamore Trail and Bike Dog Brewery.

The News-Ledger met up with the group at the construction site of the Michael McGowan Bridge, a span that will soon cross the barge canal on South River Road.

Ledesma explained to the crowd that the land was formerly owned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the $12 million bridge will first connect both halves of South River Road across the waterway, and later will connect with Village Parkway.

“It will be another arterial from north to south,” said Ledesma. “It will have bike lanes on it, and we are doing plumbing and wiring to accommodate a streetcar.”

Ledesma also made reference to a long-awaited new bridge the other direction: one running east to west, connecting West Sacramento to I-5 and Sacramento. He said that such a bridge – long opposed by Sacramento leaders – is now in the works, and this planned “Broadway Bridge” will probably land north of the bridge site, near where a Clark Pacific cement plant tower near stands.

The plant’s site, the acreage near the McGowan Bridge and much of the rest of the city’s industrial riverfront will eventually transition to more urban-style uses, said Ledesma.

And as a note of trivia, Ledesma added that West Sacramento-based Clark Pacific is the same company now fabricating pieces of the striking new “spaceshippy” headquarters for Apple in Cupertino. Clark Pacific also has a plant in Woodland.

After the brief chat at the bridge, Ledesma and his informal tour group – men, women, children and babies in trailers – pedaled north on South River Road, heading under the freeway for the rest of their tour.

 

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2014