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Youth sports: West Sac achievements in softball, water polo & more

BY DON SCHATZEL: Don is a former city parks director & occasional News-Ledger columnist. This 'Heart of the City' column appeared in the News-Ledger on July 10.

BY DON SCHATZEL: Don is a former city parks director & occasional News-Ledger columnist. This ‘Heart of the City’ column appeared in the News-Ledger on July 10.

NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 10, 2013 —

It’s the June parade of Champions! The march of the championships continues – time to celebrate  West Sac excellence in sports at all ages and games!

Too bad June has to end, but here’s hoping July brings more championships.

West Sac Water Polo is going to the Junior Olympics. The 18-U (age 18-and-under) boys, after a two day tournament, have qualified to represent this city in Orange County in a nationwide Junior Olympic tournament. Members of  the team (now fundraising for the trip) are Austin “Junior” Stewart, Christopher Irish, Hunter Hartman, Jeret Tiller, Lucas Talbott, Adam Rogers, goalie Stetson Tate.

The U-16 (under 16) boys water polo team competed in the Clovis Tournament in an Olympic-size pool over 12 games. The U-16 team is Bret Bachmeier, Johnathan Keilman, Julian Wright, Brennan Whipple, Quinn Reidel, Ryan Delarosa, Tyler “Eggnog”  Packham, and goalie Cameron Guiliano-Puzi.

All players play at the River City High School pool and many are members of the West Sacramento Dolphins swim club. To help with the team’s Junior Olympics travel expenses, call “Coach Moe” at 530-848-7273

In softball, every weekend more trophies and awards to West Sacramento.

Heck, if you are going to Reno to play might as well win: the West Sac Attack 10-U (age 10 and under team) did just that by winning the “Reno Fastpitch Freaks Tournament.” They did so with a tournament record of 5-0-1, and by beating teams such as  Reno Fastpitch, Sac Hitterz, and Lassen SWAT.

The players are; Claudia Medina, Mari Cano,Hailey Luna, Laure Garcia, Isabella Mendez, Vanessa Hensley, Jessica Baum, Chloe Kitchens, Reyna Sandoval, Amaya Pentega,and Lilly Adversalo!

All girls batted over .500. Reno never knew what hit them.
West Sac Attack U-14 also won their Sacramento tournament, and last weekend won their tournament in Manteca and followed up with another big tournament win in Elk Grove.

The Cordova Fury was led by our own Hannah Willover, who hit the first pitch for a home run. Ally Snyder pitched and Celina Vallejos played shortstop. The team won their NSA tournament in Galt.

Then the Fury won the DF Tournament, going 5-1. Ally pitched again, Hannah went 8-15 and in the championship game, they defeated the Nor Cal Elite of Fairfield with West Sacramento’s own Breanna Viktor pitching for the Elite.

The U-10 Sac Hitterz won their tournament at the Sac Sports Complex with West Sacramento’s Macy McCann and catcher Cammy McGinnist on the “Hitterz.” Macy drove in the winning run in the championship game!

West Sac’s Kayla Lynch plays for the Foothill Gold U-12 team on their way to Tennessee in a National level Tournament, and they  made it to the championship game, playing up a division,  in last weeks  DF U-14 Tournament.

Watch out, here comes the next generation of high school softball standouts!  Good luck to the U-10 West Sac Girls Little League softball  District 6 Champions, and now it’s on to the sectionals!

Congratulations to the West Sac Relay For Life walkathon. The team-oriented fundraiser joined the fight against cancer, generating $30,000!

We’re into July and our famous 100 degree heat, but continued great success is on the way.

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

 

Special porch ornament goes missing

A Southport woman just wants her bear back. It was custom-carved 25 years ago, and has "almost part of the family." (courtesy photo)

A Southport woman just wants her bear back. It was custom-carved 25 years ago, and has “almost part of the family.” (courtesy photo)

NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 10, 2013 —

By Daryl Fisher
News-Ledger Features Editor

Last weekend, Marlene Perini woke up as she always does and went outside her Alder Way home to get her Sunday newspaper. She quickly spotted her paper, but to her shock, her beloved wooden bear was no longer on the front porch as it has been for more than two decades.

“I bought my wonderful hard-carved wooden bear at a crafts show 25 years ago,” explained Marlene.  “He was created by a very talented artist who used a chainsaw to do most of the work and he did it right in front of my eyes as I waited. And after all of these years of sitting on my front porch, he is almost part of the family. He is always decorated for the holidays, surrounded by pretty poinsettias at Christmas time and a flag or spinning wheel in his hand on the 4th of July. I have lived in the very same house in the first subdivision they ever created in Southport for a very long time and nothing has ever been stolen off my front porch before. I live less than a mile away from Our Lady of Grace Catholic School and it makes you wonder what the world is coming to.”

Marlene is not really interested in getting anyone into any trouble, she just wants her bear back.

“Whoever you are who took my bear,” said Marlene, “just please put it back on my front porch right where you found it, and there will be no questions asked. Or since it is such a unique looking bear, if anybody has seen it around town, please contact the police since they know I am looking for it. He and I will both be a lot happier if he is back on my front porch where he belongs.”

  (EDITOR’S NOTE: anyone wishing to return the bear may also phone the News-Ledger, 916-371-8030.)

Copyright News-Ledger — 2013

Parenthood: power of genes & ignorance

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 3, 2013 —

I was talking to a friend the other day about how he wished he had been a better parent.

“What are you talking about?” I asked him in disbelief. “You are one of the best parents I know.”

BY DARYL FISHER, News-Ledger Features Editor

BY DARYL FISHER, News-Ledger Features Editor

“But my kids have had more than their fair share of problems as they have gotten older,” explained my friend, “and I just feel like I should have done a better job of preparing them for life. Sometimes it seems like their personalities have gotten them into all kinds of trouble that could have been easily avoided if they just weren’t who they are, if you know what I mean. And maybe if I had been a little more forceful when they were young about dealing with some of their less than attractive personality traits – you know, like stubbornness, or being too judgmental, or failing to see the humor in things – they wouldn’t have had to learn so many lessons the hard way.”

“You know,” I said, “I think most of us parents think we have a whole lot more to do with how our children turn out than we actually do, especially when it comes to their personalities.”

“What do you mean?”

“Think back to when your kids were really young,” I said. “Now if they were like mine, then they were already pretty much who they were going to be at a very early age. For instance, one of my kids never went to sleep at the proper time when he was a baby, and he still stays up half the night; another was very quiet and shy, and still is; another loved to eat and still drools over a really good meal, while one had to be almost force-fed when he was young and still plays around with his food instead of eating it. And when it comes to their personalities, it seems to me like they were all pretty much set in stone at a very early age. The ones that were better at sharing, or being sweet and loveable, or even at cleaning up their rooms, still are, while the ones who drove me nuts still do.”

“Why do you think that is?” asked my friend with interest.

“Well, I think parents really underestimate the power of the genes that are handed down to our kids, and I’m not just talking about the ones we give them. For instance, my oldest son reminds me much more of my father than he does of me, both in his personality and the way he looks. And my youngest son is a lot like my father-in-law, so I think the genes our kids get often skip generations, sometimes maybe even many generations, and I wouldn’t be all that surprised if some of my kids’ personality traits go all the way back to some guy named Fisher on the Mayflower.”

“But even if genes do play a major role in who our kids turn out to be, you must have had a few basic principles that you used as guideposts when you were raising your kids?”

“Oh sure, I had lots of those.”

“Like what for instance?”

“Well, if I remember right, parental ignorance was pretty high up on that list. Believe me, if I had known about all the stuff my kids were up to when they were young, I would have probably had a stroke. Mercifully, most of them were pretty good at keeping me in the dark, and like they say, ignorance really is bliss. Plus if the truth be known, my kids more or less raised me and made me into the grown up you see today, not the other way around.”

“So, you had a pretty much `hands off policy’ when it came to parenting?”

“Well, my kids probably wouldn’t say that, since they swear I was always on their case, but when they were young, I barely had the time to keep up with every aspect of my life, much less my children’s. Plus kids really need their own space, and parents are always forgetting that. So I really have come to believe that we adults need to sit back and take parenting a lot less seriously than we do. Now that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t create the most loving, safe and kid-friendly environment possible for our children, but at the same time, we can’t be putting all of our eggs into our kids’ baskets.”

“What do you mean by that?”

“I mean that we all only get one life to live and we need to be out there doing it, not living our lives through our children, or putting all of our self-worth into how they turn out. The reality is that in addition to enriching our lives, our children will break our hearts now and then, and we need to understand that’s just part of the agreement you’re signing onto when you decide to be a parent. Plus what most kids end up doing anyway is forgiving us for our parenting mistakes once they have kids of their own and realize just what a hard and often thankless job it is. So if I were you, I wouldn’t be spending too much time thinking you should have been a better parent. I mean, it’s already bad enough that all of us parents get to worry about our kids pretty much non-stop until the day we die!”

 

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Go to River Cats game & support local foster children

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 10, 2013

Attend the River Cats game on July 13 and support local Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) programs, which help represent children in foster care situations. For tickets, go to www.rivercats.com/fundraisers, selected CASA YOLO, and use the offer code: “Child.” Tickets are $10-22, and may be printed on your computer.

For more information on Yolo CASA, visit www.yolocasa.org.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

West Sac residence used for regional firefighters’ practice

QUICK SEARCH: A West Sacramento fire crew practices what do do when they arrive on scene and learn a victim is likely trapped in an upper floor of a burning house.    They used the ladder to break in a plywood “window,” then reset the ladder. Firefighters then “went in low, below the smoke,” explained W.S.F.D. Battalion Chief Rebecca Ramirez, and searched the room. In the photo above, you can see a little bit of the “victim” towards the right -- it’s a 175-pound practice dummy. News-Ledger photo

QUICK SEARCH: A West Sacramento fire crew practices what do do when they arrive on scene and learn a victim is likely trapped in an upper floor of a burning house.
They used the ladder to break in a plywood “window,” then reset the ladder. Firefighters then “went in low, below the smoke,” explained W.S.F.D. Battalion Chief Rebecca Ramirez, and searched the room. In the photo above, you can see a little bit of the “victim” towards the right — it’s a 175-pound practice dummy.
News-Ledger photo

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 3, 2013 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

Although the fake smoke machine wasn’t on hand Friday morning, the goal was still to make it “as real as possible” for firefighters training at a borrowed multi-residential unit on B Street, said Rebecca Ramirez, a Battalion Chief for the West Sacramento Fire Department.

Retired firefighter and landlord Ric Dorris lent the building out for the session.

Visiting to hone their techniques and “get on the same page” were crews from Davis, UC Davis, Woodland and Yolo’s Yocha Dehe tribe, along with West Sac. They’re often often called upon to back each other up and work together.

“It’s about sharing knowledge and best practices, said Ramirez.

Not too many years ago, fire departments could be dismayed to arrive on scene in a neighboring jurisdiction and find that their hoses weren’t compatible with the locals’.  Or that they had different terminologies. A lot of those troubles have been solved. But not all.

“If someone says, I have a firefighter in trouble who entered the ‘alpha’ side, everybody needs to know what that is,” she explained.

A burning structure gets each side named, and “alpha” is often the front. Progressing around the building are its other walls — “beta,” “charlie” and so on.

At training sessions like this, firefighters also practice specific techniques — “the more ‘tools’ you have in your toolbox, the more likely you can solve a problem,” said Ramirez.

News-Ledger photo

News-Ledger photo

 

 FALLEN FIREFIGHTER: West Sacramento Fire Department’s James Staley, acting as instructor (above) , explains how to lift a firefighter who has fallen through the floor into the basement.

  “They get a ‘charged’ hose line in there and push it down through the floor,” explained Rebecca Ramirez, W.S.F.D. Battalion Chief. “They anchor one end. They attache a loop. The firefighter actually gets on it and straddles it, and climbs the end that is anchored.”

  While the firefighter is climbing, his colleagues are lifting the other end of the hose to help.

  You can see that part of the exercise — what’s going on below the hole in the floor — below.

(News-Ledger photo)

(News-Ledger photo)

ABOVE: Some of the firefighters on scene Friday to train at a vacant residential unit on B Street. Battalion Chief Rebecca Ramirez is at far left  (and she receives  a promotion to Division Chief this week). News-Ledger photo.

ABOVE: Some of the firefighters on scene Friday to train at a vacant residential unit on B Street. Battalion Chief Rebecca Ramirez is at far left (and she receives a promotion to Division Chief this week). News-Ledger photo.

  Do you like what you see here?

 

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

 

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

 

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

 

 

 

Group rates for solar in Yolo County

MATT REXROAD Yolo County Supervisor, whose Third District includes southern Woodland and the northern edge of West Sacramento (County of Yolo photo)

MATT REXROAD
Yolo County Supervisor, whose Third District includes southern Woodland and the northern edge of West Sacramento (County of Yolo photo)

JULY 3, 2013 — FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

By Matt Rexroad
Yolo County Supervisor

Energy independence means different things to different people and no energy source will better help residents hedge against rising electricity costs and move from dirty sources of energy more than solar. It is a domestic, reliable, renewable and abundant solution.

On this Independence Day, consider this: enough solar energy hits the U.S. each hour to power our nation for a year.

In 2008 local governments and other organizations including school districts and universities joined the Yolo County Climate Change Compact. These jurisdictions, including Yolo County and the cities of Davis, Winters, Woodland and West Sacramento pledged to take steps to offer programs that engaged citizens in reducing climate change through energy conservation and renewable energy solutions like solar.

If you’ve been thinking about putting solar on your roof, or fixing those leaky windows and ducts, but were put off by the cost, throughout the month of July the Yolo Climate Compact is providing homeowners with an opportunity to learn if these solutions are right for their home through a limited time program called Energy Benefits Yolo.

Energy Benefits Yolo is a new group discount program for energy efficiency upgrades and solar installations led by the Yolo Climate Compact and the non-profit ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability USA. By pooling buying power of the community, the program offers residents the ability to add solar energy to their homes at prices that are 20% lower than the average cost of solar in Yolo County.

The program also helps homeowners by taking the guesswork out of selecting a reputable vendor, as it uses certified contractors that went through a vetting and approval process. According to Tom Stallard, a member of the Woodland city council “I used the program to install solar on my house and have been impressed with the results and want others to know about this opportunity.”

The Yolo Climate Compact’s motivation for the program is to encourage residents to at least consider energy efficiency upgrades and solar energy for their home. “Solar energy is a great way to stabilize your energy costs for the next 25 years,” reports Yolo Energy Watch Program Manager John-Mott Smith.

Summer necessities in Yolo County like air conditioning and pool pumps can add significant cost to electric bills. Installing new insulation and harnessing solar power is a great way for families throughout our community to become energy independent and live comfortably year round without spending a fortune. The onsite solar assessment is free (electricity and solar hot water), and the onsite energy efficiency assessment is discounted to $99 for most homes (normally $500).

As the Chair of the Yolo Climate Compact, I am proud to champion this program along with the Mayors of Davis, Winters, Woodland and West Sacramento. To date over 220 residents have participated in Energy Benefits Yolo. Join your neighbors and get signed up to receive a no-obligation assessment by July 31.

Visit: http://www.mygroupenergy.com/yolo/.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Caution issued for city dog park

NEWS-LEDGER ONLINE — JULY 8, 2013 —

The City of West Sacramento on Friday issued a warning about a possible canine parvovirus threat at the dog park on Stone Boulevard.

A local dog was reported to have developed the contagious disease. The dog had frequented the Sam Combs Dog Park, 205 Stone Blvd.

“Following the advice of veterinarians, city staff completed steps to minimize the further spread of the virus,” said statement on the City website. “Unvaccinated animals should avoid using Sam Combs Park at the present time. Consult your vet for more information. Canine Parvovirus is not known to infect humans.”

Copyright News-Ledger 2013