Tag Archives: city of west sacramento

Cycling group honors West Sacramento

NEWS-LEDGER -OCT 23, 2013 —

From the City of West Sacramento

The League of American Bicyclists has awarded the City of West Sacramento the “Bronze” level of Bicycle Friendly Communities (BFC), making West Sacramento the latest city to join a list of 291 BFCs in the U.S.

The Bronze BFC award recognizes West Sacramento’s commitment to improving conditions for bicycling through investment in bicycling promotion, educations programs, infrastructure and pro-bicycling policies.

“West Sacramento has rapidly emerged as one of the region’s top five cities for biking, and this Bicycle Friendly Community Designation shows our commitment to create a city that makes cycling an even safer, quicker and more convenient way to get around town and throughout the region’s urban core,” said West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon in a press release.

Earlier this year, the City of West Sacramento became the first city in the region  to support development of a “low stress” bike network, following the city council’s approval of a new Bicycle, Pedestrian and Trails Master Plan. The city’s “low stress” bike network encourages residents to use bikes for local trips, recreation and commuting. West Sacramento has 44 miles of bikeways and trails, with an eventual goal of creating 102 miles of bikeways and trails.

  (In May, the News-Ledger wrote about the city’s ‘Bicycle, Pedestrian and Trails Master Plan’ and included a graphic of the trail map online. You can find that article and zoomable map online here.)

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

New use for old docks? West Sac looks at updating Raley’s dock, rice mill pier

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — OCT 23, 2013 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

West Sacramento city staff have begun plans to upgrade and rehabilitate a couple of the town’s connections with the Sacramento River. At a September 9 public meeting, about a dozen members of the public showed up to listen to staff’s ideas, and share the

  The ‘old’ dock at Raley’s Landing. Accessed from a ramp behind the ziggurat building, it faced Old Sacramento across the Sacramento River. Formerly home to a paddlewheeler and used as a ‘water taxi’ stop, the location may again start to draw boaters. This shot shows the former downstream end of the dock; a row of disused pilings now stands ready to be reused to the upstream (left) side of the photo.    (photo from City of West Sacramento)

The ‘old’ dock at Raley’s Landing. Accessed from a ramp behind the ziggurat building, it faced Old Sacramento across the Sacramento River. Formerly home to a paddlewheeler and used as a ‘water taxi’ stop, the location may again start to draw boaters. This shot shows the former downstream end of the dock; a row of disused pilings now stands ready to be reused to the upstream (left) side of the photo. (photo from City of West Sacramento)

ir own, about the Raley’s dock and the Rice Mill Pier.

The “Raley’s Landing” dock was dismantled by the city almost two years ago after deteriorating into a navigational hazard. Accessed by a ramp behind the ziggurat building, north of the Tower Bridge, the dock was formerly a home for the paddleboat “Elizabeth Louise” and later as a stop for the “River Otter Taxi Service.” It was originally built as a private dock for the Raley’s corporation, founded by the late Tom Raley.

The City of West Sacramento now has a lease from the State Lands Commission for use of the dock and gangway.

Tentative plans call for the dock to be rebuilt to modern, disability-compliant standards, and provide a lighted spot for public boats to dock temporarily. Construction would use existing pilings and new concrete floats. With a 430-foot overall length, the new dock would include a berthing dock (downstream) that is 60 feet long and 25 feet wide, and an upriver stretch that’s 370 feet long and eight feet wide.

Further downriver is the site of the existing – but closed and fenced-off – “Rice Mill Pier,” which juts onto the Sacramento River in West Sacramento’s Bridge District. According to a city staff report, a rice storage and milling facility was built at this waterfront (not far north of the U.S. 50 freeway bridge) in 1918. A later owner, the Rice Growers Association, obtained permission for “wharfage” in 1982.  The site is now owned by Smart Growth Investors II, LLC, led by Mark Friedman. That company is spearheading development of the mixed-use “Bridge District,” located between the Tower Bridge and freeway on West Sacramento’s waterfront.

  The Rice Mill Pier is now gated off. It’s just north of the U.S. 50 freeway bridge (background) and may be redesigned to attract pedestrians out for a riverfront walk, as the surrounding Bridge District redevelops. Planned work would also remove flotsam backing up along the pier’s pilings -- and try to keep this floating debris from accumulating in the future (Photo from the City of West Sacramento)

The Rice Mill Pier is now gated off. It’s just north of the U.S. 50 freeway bridge (background) and may be redesigned to attract pedestrians out for a riverfront walk, as the surrounding Bridge District redevelops. Planned work would also remove flotsam backing up along the pier’s pilings — and try to keep this floating debris from accumulating in the future (Photo from the City of West Sacramento)

The 30-year “wharfage” lease expired in 2012, and the City of West Sacramento is now applying for a  new pier lease.

City officials are drawing up plans to “rehabilitate the existing pier for public access” and repair the pier’s substructure. The new pier would offer pedestrians hand rails and lighting as they view the water from above.

Planners hope to obtain grant money from the state’s Department of Boating and Waterways to pursue the pier and dock projects over the next several years.

Last month’s public presentation at city hall was co-hosted by John Sneed of the Public Works Department.

 

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Toy drive, car show & ‘rolling cruise’ —

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER  —

The West Sacramento Christmas Basket Project will host “The Rollin’ Cruise Car Show and Toy Drive” at 10 a.m. on Nov. 9 at Raley Field. Free to the public; $5 parking next to the stadium. Food trucks, raffles, live music and a police K-9 demonstration. The “entry fee” to show off your car is either a new toy, new child’s jacket or a cash donation (all tax deductible).

The Christmas Basket Project distributes holiday food baskets and toys to local families in need.

The car cruise begins at 2 p.m. The event will be followed by a 6 p.m. taco feed at the Moose Lodge, 3240 Jefferson Blvd. For more information on the car show and toy drive, visit the West Sacramento Police Department Facebook page.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

West Sac woman helps women fighting cancer to look & feel better

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — OCT 23, 2013 —

By Anita Fizhugh
Fitzhugh Public Relations

Randy Smedley of West Sacramento meets a lot of women who are losing their hair and are embarrassed to leave home. They don’t look like themselves anymore. They don’t feel the same. These women are battling cancer, and the effects of chemotherapy and radiation are altering their appearance– and self-esteem.

RANDY SMEDLY (courtesy photo)

RANDY SMEDLY (courtesy photo)

Smedly is a volunteer for the American Cancer Society’s “Look Good Feel Better” program. “Look Good Feel Better” holds free workshops for women hoping to combat the appearance-related side effects of cancer treatment.

“I am proud to assist in providing so many cancer patients with step-by-step makeovers that include make-up application, nail care techniques and advice on how to deal with hair loss by wearing wigs, scarves, hats and other hairpieces. I see the look of joy in these women’s eyes when they recognize the person they see in the mirror,” said Smedly.

Randy knows exactly how these cancer patients feel —because she was one of them.

“My journey with cancer began in December, 2008, when one phone call turned my world upside down. My physician told me that I had triple negative breast cancer – an aggressive cancer that does not respond to treatments such as hormonal therapy. I was told that the chances of triple negative breast cancer returning were greatest in the first three years. After that, the chances decreased dramatically,” she said.

Knowing that she would worry about every possible ache and pain in her breasts, Smedly elected to have a bilateral mastectomy. She met with a surgeon and an oncologist. It was during one of these appointments that she was handed a plastic binder with information on what to expect as a cancer patient. On the inside flap was a business card for the American Cancer Society including its 1-800-227-2345 number to call for help.

“One restless night, I called that number. A sympathetic young man answered the phone and listened to me… really listened. He ended up connecting me with the American Cancer Society’s ‘Reach for Recovery’ program that was able to identify a volunteer who had survived triple negative breast cancer. It was the beginning of what would become a life-long friendship,” Smedly shared.

At one of her chemotherapy appointments, she noticed a pamphlet for the “Look Good Feel Better” program. She decided to attend one of the workshops, was fitted with a wig and learned a few new make-up tricks. “My daughter told me I looked cute—and I felt that way,” remembers Randy. “It’s been five years since my diagnosis and my cancer is still in remission. I know I’m fortunate for my outcome and feel strongly that it’s my turn to help other cancer patients look and feel their best. And as a cancer survivor, I know there is no better feeling.”

Smedly joined around 20,000 area residents for the American Cancer Society’s “Making Strides Against Breast Cancer” rally on Sunday, Oct. 20, at the Capitol.

 

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  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013