Tag Archives: city

Wolfington guilty in 2011 motel stabbing

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER ONLINE — JUNE 17, 2013 —

  Yolo County District Attorney Jeff Reisig’s office announced that on Friday, a Yolo County Jury convicted gang member Billy Thomas Wolfington, Jr., 29, of second degree murder,, criminal street gang activity and personal use of a deadly weapon.  The jury found that on September 2, 2011, Wolfington stabbed and killed Bobby Jamar Brittenum, 29, of Sacramento.   The jury acquitted Shannon Lashaun Silva, 32, of Sacramento of related charges.

  Prosecutors had originally sought first-degree murder charges against both, with “gang enhancements.”

  The murder occurred at a party at the Town House Motel, 940 West Capitol Avenue. There, Wolfington and Silva confronted Brittenum, said the D.A.’s office.  Wolfington and Silva entered the hotel room and told other partygoers to leave the room.  Others protested and an argument ensued.  Witnesses testified that Silva then began punching the victim and Wolfington stabbed the victim at least sixteen times with a six-inch “butterfly” knife.  Wolfington stopped stabbing the victim when one partygoer began screaming for help out the hotel window.  Wolfington and Silva fled then the scene.   The victim suffered stab wounds to his face, chest and arms.  Wolfington and Silva were found a short time later hiding in heavy brush near some railroad tracks.

  Also, according to the D.A.’s office, the prosecution introduced evidence of Wolfington’s and Silva’s gang history and membership.  Wolfington is a member of the “Broderick Boys” criminal street gang and also shares membership with Silva in a newer gang called the “Northern Ryders.” During the murder, witnesses testified that Wolfington told the victim that he was a Broderick Boy.  Gang expert testimony argued that when a gang member either asks or describes where he is from, that this is effectively a challenge, in gang parlance.  An expert for the prosecution also testified that violent crimes such as murders elevate the level of fear of a gang, creating a benefit by discouraging witnesses from coming forward to report crimes.  As the prosecution explained, the victim’s refusal to leave the room was an act of disrespect that would diminish the reputation of the gang if the disrespect was not answered with violence.

  District Attorney Reisig praised local police in a press statement.

  “The West Sacramento Police Department and the prosecution team worked hard in convicting a dangerous criminal who took a man’s life,” said Reisig. 

  A court trial regarding Wolfington’s past convictions is scheduled for July 1 before Judge Stephen L. Mock, who presided over the trial. Wolfington will be sentenced after the conclusion of the court trial.  He faces life in prison.

  Wolfington was at the center of a local court case decided in 2007.

  The Yolo County District Attorney’s office crafted an anti-gang injunction in West Sacramento, targeting the Broderick Boys. The D.A.’s office asserted that the gang was an “unincorporated association” with about 350 members. When serving the gang with judicial notice, the notice was delivered only to Wolfington – with the assumption that this would be adequate legal “service” to the entire gang.

  The ACLU and others challenged the process, and a judge agreed that service was inadequate. The original injunction was tossed out. The D.A.’s office and local police have since crafted and instituted a new version of the gang injunction, which provides a curfew and other restrictions on “validated” gang members in much of the city’s north.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

HEART OF THE CITY: Southport Elementary wins a couple of WUSD scholastic sports titles

BY DON SCHATZEL (special to the News-Ledger)

BY DON SCHATZEL (special to the News-Ledger)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER NEWSPAPER — JUNE 12, 2013 —

Summer has started, graduations are done and it’s time for congratulations to all the graduates. Best of luck in the future!  Parents: you, too, can take a bow. You made it so far!

Southport takes a double:
Southport Elementary School won both the Washington Unified School District Boys Flag Football Championship and the Girls Volleyball Championship last week.

I didn’t get a chance to go to the football playoffs but I did make it to the terrific volleyball championships at Riverbank School. I’d like to give a special note of thanks to Carmelita Goldsby, vice principal at Southport Elementary, who attended the games and supported her school.

The final four started with Westmore Oaks squaring off against pre-tournament favorite Bridgeway Island.

Bridgeway Island won the first game 25-17 and things seemed to be going true to form. But Westmore gutted it out and  roared back to win game 2, 25-20. The match was on.

Bridgeway fought for their lives and eventually won a great match in game three, 16-14. At one point, the volleyball was such a high quality there was a combined 11-hit  back-and-forth rally to decide one point.

Jasmine Anderson, Liliana Flores,Evelyn Bredkhin and Ashley Potts and former United States Youth Volleyball League standout Mallory Cypress were all sited for great play for Westmore  Oaks.

Xavionna Bryant-Davis, Sofie Russ, Avi Torres were great playmakers for Bridgeway Island taking them to familiar championship game territory..

In the other semifinal, Southport sought to avenge their earlier season loss to a tough Elkhorn  squad and came out blasting.

Southport won 2 games in a row to take the match 26-24 and 25-11 to setup the Championship vs. Brideway Island  the next night.

Itzel Geronimo, Diana Rocha, Jessica Urbina were great players for Elkhorn.

Michelle Trussel, Ashley davis, Mikala Drewry led the Southport charge

Southport took their momentum into the two-night championship schedule,  defeating Bridgeway Island 25-12 and 25-18 to win the championship in 2013.

A couple of weeks ago I happened to be in the cities of  Lincoln and Rocklin and, as usual, surrounded by West Sac softball players at championship tourneys.

First it was Ally Snyder, Hannah Wilover, Bella Munoz Alaina Castillio, Amarissa Medina, Elizabeth Cafaro, Jordan Criswell,Kylie Myers.

Then the following week at the Sac Softball complex it was Meghan Mckeever, Anjelica Blackmer, Melissa Corona, Crystal Diaz, all playing for  a variety of teams — the Pride, Hittterz, Attack and Bandits Fury. It is especially nice to see them in the championship awards presentations. I bet  not a weekend goes by that some West Sac softball player is being recognized for a softball championship somewhere in this area, in California or in the country.Great players!

Another softball note: on the two teams this year in the NCAA Womens Softball Champion ship played by Tennessee and Oklahoma 12 players were from California.
I also watched agame in the Sac Joaquin High School Softball Championships, and there were our own Alaina Guerra and Meghan Mckeever playing for Christian Brothers.

Congratulations to Walt James of the Centennial Rotary Club of West Sacramento for being named the District 5180 Rotarian of the Year. Out of 40 clubs and about 1,600 Rotarians Walt was accorded this great honor.

Also, congratulations to Beverly Sandeen of the Centennial Club for being recognized by Mayor Christopher Cabaldon for her contributions to the community.

Have a great summer!

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

 

Driver in gang killing denied parole

NEWS-LEDGER ONLINE — JUNE 14, 2013 —

  Yolo County District Attorney Jeff Reisig reports that on Tuesday, parole commissioners denied parole to 32-year-old convicted murderer Ramiro Acevedo, Jr..  The hearing took place at the California State Prison in Soledad, California where Acevedo is serving a 15-to-life sentence in prison. 

  According to the District Attorney’s office, Acevedo was a member of West Sacramento’s “Broderick Boys” gang who participated in a 1999 killing. Said a press release from the D.A.:

   On August 26th, 1999, Acevedo and fellow Broderick Boy Manuel Trujillo went to the home of 18-year-old Julio Robledo to retaliate for a shooting where Trujillo was allegedly targeted. Acevedo sat in the car while Trujillo went up to the house with a shotgun and fatally shot Robledo in the chest. Others were seriously injured in the shooting.

  Acevedo received the 15-to-life sentence in a deal with prosecutors to testify against Trujillo, who was convicted by a jury of first degree murder as well as two counts of attempted murder. The parole commission praised recent efforts Acevedo has made in prison to focus his life in more positive directions, but were swayed by the serious circumstances of the case as well as Acevedo’s inadequate parole plans.   

  Supervising Deputy District Attorney Garrett Hamilton represented the District Attorney’s Office at the hearing.  Victim Service’s Program Manager Laura Valdes attended the hearing with the mother of the victim Julio Robledo.  Valdes said it was an honor and humbling to assist and support Robledo’s mother at the hearing.  “This was extremely difficult for her,” said Valdes, according to the D.A.’s office.  “She told me in Spanish that being at the hearing was fulfilling and she felt her words had an impact on the decision made by the commissioners.”

  District Attorney Jeff Reisig applauded the success of the Parole Lifer Unit and praised the decision of the commissioners.  “The commissioners’ decision was thoughtful and measured,” Reisig stated in a press release.  “Also, we cannot ignore the dedicated efforts of Mr. Hamilton, who made the case on behalf of this office, and Ms. Valdes, who helped the victim through this heartwrenching experience.”

  Acevedo will not be eligible for parole again until 2016.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Kiwanis offer free summer camp for kids

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

The Kiwanis Club in West Sacramento wants to send 50 local children, age 9-11, to summer camp from July 7-13 – free of charge. For an application, call Mauda at (916) 372-2489 or Ken at 372-0549.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Police K9 competition open to public

A police dog goes after West Sacramento police officer Nick Barreiro, who is wearing  protective clothing. (News-Ledger 2011 file photo by Eric Harding, www.ebharding.com)

A police dog goes after West Sacramento police officer Nick Barreiro, who is wearing protective clothing. (News-Ledger 2011 file photo by Eric Harding, www.ebharding.com)

NEWS-LEDGER ONLINE — JUNE 14, 2013

You and your family are invited to watch the “LAWDOGS Police K9 Competition’ Saturday (June 15) at River City High School from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Police dog teams from several agencies will compete in categories of search, agility, obedience and protection. The “protection” competition starts after 12:00 p.m. and the SWAT/K9 demo will be about 11:30 a.m.  There will be other information and activities on site.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Johannessen to run for state assembly

NEWS-LEDGER ONLINE — JUNE 13, 2013 —

West Sacramento City Councilman Mark Johannessen made it official today: he will run next year for the California Assembly seat now held by fell0w Democrat Roger Dickinson. Dickinson plans to run for the State Senate seat now held by Darrell Steinberg, who will step down due to term limits.

“I am proud of what has been accomplished since my election to the West Sacramento City Council in 2006. By bringing together businesses and the community, we have created a culture of governmental efficiency that is widely respected throughout the region. Together, we have promoted economic growth, improved local schools, reduced crime, and focused on senior health and transportation issues,” said Johannessen in an emailed statement.

MARK JOHANNESSEN (News-Ledger file photo)

MARK JOHANNESSEN (News-Ledger file photo)

“Even though my campaign for Assembly is just beginning,” he added, “I have already received the support of state and local leaders including (state board of education member)Betty Yee, (Yolo) County Supervisors Mike McGowan, Jim Provenza, and Don Saylor, West Sacramento City Councilmember Bill Kristoff, as well as business leaders like Mark Friedman and Jeff Savage and the support of many labor organizations and neighborhood leaders. ”

Johannessen’s current city council term ends in 2014.

He is the son of former state senator K. Maurice Johannessen.

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Make your garden friendly to honey bees, as well as native bee species

The male ‘carpenter bee’ -- a native bee. Click to enlarge.  (Courtesy of ALLAN JONES)

The male ‘carpenter bee’ — a native bee also known as the “teddy bear bee.” Click to enlarge. (Courtesy of ALLAN JONES)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JUNE 5, 2013 —

By Mary K. Hanson
Tuleyome Association

Most likely you recognize the European honey bees when you see them, but did you know that California also boasts over 1600 species of native bees?  There are actually over 300 species just in Yolo County alone, and like honey bees, these guys lend a significant hand in pollinating local crops.

Recognizing many of the native bee species may be a little difficult for those of us without an entomology background, but there are some real standouts like the Blue Orchard Bees, the Metallic Sweat Bees, and the Valley Carpenter Bees which at about 1-inch in length are the largest bees in California.  The female Carpenter Bees are shiny black, but the stingless males are fat, fuzzy and golden blond with large green compound eyes.  They are often referred to as “Teddy Bear Bees.”

At the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven in Davis, CA, I was lucky enough to speak with Dr. Robbin Thorp about bee conservation and how we can all help to preserve the species that are native to our region… and I also got up close to some of the Teddy Bear Bees. Some bee species are dwindling in numbers due to loss of habitat, disease and malnutrition.  In northern California, for example, four species of bumblebees are already on the endangered list and one, the Franklin’s Bumblebee, may now be extinct.  The good news is that it’s not too late to help our native bees.  You can even create native-bee-friendly zones right in your own backyard.

Unlike honey bees that live together in massive colonies, native bees are generally solitary and unobtrusive guests.  They live in small burrows in the ground or in narrow tunnels in wood.  In your garden, you can encourage native bees to nest by providing them with patches of sunny, untilled, well-drained soil to burrow into.  Or you can set up “bee condos” for them by drilling tunnels into chunks of wood, and setting those up in your garden.

After mating, the female bee will enter her underground hideout or the bee condo you’ve created, and will lay her eggs on little balls of doughy pollen.  She’ll then seal up the brood chamber with mud, pieces of leaves or resin so the babies are safe and well fed while they’re developing.

  Most native bees don’t live for more than a season, and they spend a lot of time in their burrows while they’re maturing, so you may only see them on the wing for a month or two.  The best time to see the Teddy Bear Bees, for example, is between May and June in the late afternoon.   Keep in mind that while the female bees have stingers, they usually only use them if they get trapped somewhere (like inside your clothing).

Dr. Thorp reminds us that native bees are “vegans” who need sugar from nectar and protein from pollen to survive, so planting a garden with that in mind will help to sustain the bees in your area.  Almond trees, apple trees, acacia, germander and salvia plants produce a lot of flowers the bees really go for.  They also like thyme, rosemary and most forms of daisy-like flowers.  If you’re planting rose bushes, keep in mind that there isn’t enough pollen in the fancy multi-petal hybrid roses to feed the bees; they need roses with the simple five-petal blossoms on them that have lots of anthers.  Plant for blooms throughout the year and you’ll always have a supply of food for the bees. All of this will help ensure pollination of your flowers and fruit trees, and will turn your backyard into a friendly place for the bees to be!

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013