Tag Archives: city

UPDATE: Feb. 27 crime sweep

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

The West Sacramento Police Department just announced an operation this morning in which about a dozen warrants were served — all but one of them in West Sacramento — after an investigation into a string of vehicle and residential burglaries in town.

Lt. David Delaini of the West Sacramento Police Department talks about a sweep done in response to a local wave in car and home burglaries (News-Ledger photo)

Lt. David Delaini of the West Sacramento Police Department talks about a sweep done in response to a local wave in car and home burglaries (News-Ledger photo)

Lieutenant David Delaini of the West Sacramento Police Department said about $20,000 in illegal drugs — including methamphetamine and marijuana — were seized, along with cash, an assault rifle and other guns.

“Any time we take guns off the street and drugs off the street, that’s a victory for us,” Delaini told a press conference at about noon today. “You can see the weapons with lights (mounted) on them and you seem some stabbing weapons,” he said, referring to a table of seized items spread out for the press.

A department press release described the operation:

“The California Department of Justice, Yolo Narcotic Enforcement Team (YONET) and The West Sacramento Police Department conducted a collaborative investigation into a burglary ring, stemming from over 80 residential burglaries and 51 vehicle burglaries from December 2012 to present.   These burglaries extended throughout the city and outlying regions.  One state arrest warrant and 12 state search warrants were executed today in an attempt to recover stolen property.”

“The investigation has resulted in 13 arrests, three assault rifles, four handguns, (several of which had been stolen), an active honey oil lab (used to create marijuana extract) , five pounds of marijuana, a quarter pound methamphetamine, ammunition, and body armor.  Additionally, three locations contained children who were removed by CPS due to their access and proximity to the firearms and drugs.  Everyone arrested will be booked into the Yolo County Jail and juvenile hall.”

“The operation in West Sacramento was named ‘Operation Red Bandits’ because the members of this burglary ring have been identified as active members of the Norteno criminal street gang,” said police.

  The operation aimed for young perpetrators responsible for robberies, home burglaries, carjackings, and shootings in and around the Sacramento region.

“These gang members and associates have supported their gang life style through illegal sales of methamphetamine and marijuana, as well as stolen property,” said the police press release. “These street level gang members have been identified and range in age from 16-20 years old.”

Those arrested face charges including possession of narcotics, narcotics sales and distribution, conspiracy, property crimes (burglaries, possession of stolen property), and violent crimes against persons (such as robberies, carjackings, and firearms charges.

Guns seized in the West Sacramento-based operation -- some were stolen and at least one was an illegal assault weapon, according to WSPD. (News-Ledger photo)

Guns seized in the West Sacramento-based operation — some were stolen and at least one was an illegal assault weapon, according to WSPD. (News-Ledger photo)

Wrist-mounted slashing weapon with three blades, seized in the raids (News-Ledger photo)

Wrist-mounted slashing weapon with three blades, seized in the raids (News-Ledger photo)

Bags of marijuana, and seized cash (News-Ledger photo)

Bags of marijuana, and seized cash (News-Ledger photo)

 

 

Assistance in the operation came from the CHP, Department of Justice Task Forces (Placer SIU, MAVMIT), Davis Police Department SWAT, FBI SAFE Streets Task Force, Woodland Police Department SWAT, Yolo County Sheriff’s Department SWAT, Yolo County District Attorney’s Office and the Yolo County Gang Task Force, said local police.

West Sacramento Police Department’s Lt. DeAnna Stevens provided the News-Ledger with a list of the West Sacramento locations raided on Wednesday:
540 Arthur Dr.; 614 Andrew St.; 829 Elm St.; 300 4th St.; 430 Maple St. #120; 510 Maple St. #1; 2120 Evergreen Ave. #A; 1809 Proctor Ave.; 2131 Hickory St.; 1020 Haverhill St.; and 1705 Westwood Circle.

Also on the list was an Elk Grove address.

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

A new generation takes the field, joins Little League tradition

BY DARYL FISHER, News-Ledger Features Editor

BY DARYL FISHER, News-Ledger Features Editor

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — MARCH 6, 2013 —

Well, spring is already here, or at least it sure feels like it. The sun has been out for weeks, birds are chirping, and I’ve already had my first mosquito bite. Actually, the way I have always known that spring has finally arrived in Northern California is that major league baseball players have reported to their spring training camps in warm places like Arizona and Florida, and our own West Sacramento Little League is beginning to hum with activity. Teams are being picked, fundraisers have begun, Picture Day has been scheduled, and best of all, Opening Day will be here before we know it (March 16th this year), complete with the only Annual Little League Parade in the whole Sacramento area.

When I was growing up in West Sacramento back in the 1950s and 1960s, there was simply nothing more important than the start of the Little League baseball season. It seemed like the whole town was full of men and boys who loved the sport of baseball and many of the former had worked tirelessly to create one of the best Little Leagues in the greater Sacramento region. Men like James Cameron, Jack Dunlap, Clyde Burt, Carl Youngblood, Joe Bottino, Herb Hoskins, John Kimbrough, Leroy McReynolds, Red McKinnon, Bob Lukins, Bob Domasky, Bill Havey, and many, many others whose names I no longer recall had used determination and lots of hard work to bring Little League baseball to West Sacramento, and by 1959 they had built baseball diamonds at Memorial Park considered so good that they were used to host that year’s Little League Western Regionals.

Back in those early years of Little League baseball in West Sacramento, it seemed like every mom and pop business in town was a proud sponsor of one of the teams, and you can still walk into places like Havey’s Barbershop and Crest Jewelers and see framed photos of long ago WSLL teams.

  Anyway, back when I was nine years old and convinced that I would someday be the starting shortstop for the New York Yankees or the Milwaukee Braves (I wasn’t quite sure yet if I wanted to play in the American or National leagues) I knew that the first real step to baseball fame and glory started with getting chosen to play on one of the teams in the West Sacramento Little League. So off I eagerly went to my first tryout where I did pretty good in the field, but not so good with a bat in my hands. But the manager of the major league Braves, Bill Havey, decided to take a chance on me and selected me to be on his team.

West Sacramento Little League’s “Braves,” around 1960. The author is standing, third kid from the right

West Sacramento Little League’s “Braves,” around 1960. The author is standing, third kid from the right

I can still remember my excitement when I was given my first West Sacramento Little League uniform to wear. It had “Braves” written boldly across the front of the jersey exactly as the real Milwaukee Braves logo looked and best of all I had been assigned uniform #10, which for some reason long forgotten I had actually prayed would be given to me. Since only numbers 1 through 15 were handed out back in those days, no one wanted to get #11 or #13 or some other really uncool number, so I was beyond thrilled knowing that I would be wearing #10 throughout my Little League career.

Nowadays, you can start playing Little League at a much younger age than when I was a Brave. Back then there were only two divisions, the majors and minors. The minor league teams had wonderful names taken from some of the old Pacific Coast League teams like the Solons, Stars, Padres, Oaks, Angels and Rainiers, and 9 and 10 year olds mostly played on those teams. Then when you got to be 11 or 12 years old, you usually went up to the majors and played on teams like the Giants, Dodgers, Yankees, Cubs and Braves. But now young boys and girls can start playing pee-wee baseball as early as the age of four or five, which finally brings me to my little story:

The other day my son-in-law showed up at my house as excited as I had seen him in some time.

“What’s Dallas so happy about?” I asked my daughter.

“Oh, he was out playing baseball with Will (my five-year old grandson) this morning and I guess Will hit a couple of home runs or something,” answered my daughter matter-of-factly, having never been much of a baseball fan herself.

“You should have seen him,” said Dallas with genuine pride and excitement. “For some reason he turned around all on his own and started hitting left-handed instead of right-handed and bingo, he was just crushing the ball!”

“But Will is right-handed,” my daughter reminded her husband. “Maybe you shouldn’t be trying to teach him to hit a ball left-handed? Maybe it will confuse him or screw something up? His little brain is still not completely formed yet you know.”

“Are you kidding?” said Dallas. “Do you know how much better your chances are of making the big leagues if you can throw right-handed and bat left-handed? Who knows, maybe I can even make him into a switch-hitter down the road? Wow, a switch-hitting shortstop. Now that really could be his ticket to the Big Show! I can hardly wait for Little League to start this year!

“Dallas,” pleaded my daughter, “don’t forget, he’s only five years old. He’s not exactly ready for the major leagues yet.”

“You can never get them started too young when it comes to baseball, right Daryl?” asked Dallas.

“Not in West Sacramento!” I answered.

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

What are those gizmos? Are you on camera at local traffic intersections?

ABOVE: Optical detection camera to sense approaching vehicles (white) and optical sensor to pick up the white strobe lights of a police car or fire truck (black). Photo taken on Jefferson Blvd.

ABOVE: Optical detection camera to sense approaching vehicles (white) and optical sensor to pick up the white strobe lights of a police car or fire truck (black). Photo taken on Jefferson Blvd.

NEWS-LEDGER — MARCH 6, 2013 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

Have you ever seen those gizmos mounted on West Sacramento traffic poles, and wondered if they’re cameras? And, if so, who’s watching you?

There are at least three types of pole-mounted sensors around town at different street intersections. And Peter Hanson, an engineering assistant with the City of West Sacramento’s Public Works Department, reminds us that none of them is a “red light” camera. The city doesn’t currently have a “red light camera” program to catch red light runners.

So what, exactly, are these devices?

At the corner of Jefferson Boulevard and Stone Boulevard, near the railroad tracks, you may see a thing that looks like a hanging bulb. It’s one of several security cameras operated out of the Port of West Sacramento, which is serviced by the railroad.

“These cameras have a dual purpose,” reported Hanson. “’A,’, to observe the intersection (for security), and ‘B,’ to observe the traffic at the intersection.”

Aside from monitoring security, the camera’s view can be used by city staff to see how traffic light timing changes are affecting the flow of traffic, for example.

ABOVE: The all-seeing eye of a port ecurity camera near the railroad tracks and Jefferson Boulevard, north of Stone Boulevard (photos by Thomas Farley and the News-Ledger)

ABOVE: The all-seeing eye of a port ecurity camera near the railroad tracks and Jefferson Boulevard, north of Stone Boulevard (photos by Thomas Farley and the News-Ledger)

Another type of “camera” seen at some traffic-light controlled intersections is a long, white cylindrical device. Those are directly linked to the traffic light controls.

“Those are video detection systems,” explained Hanson. “It knows if a car is coming or not. It actually sees cars, and changes the light for them. It ‘sees’ through algorithms, and it looks at the differences in contrast” in its field of view.

Then there are the more numerous little black items mounted on many a local traffic light pole.

“That’s a detector for emergency vehicles,” said Hanson. “If you look at an emergency vehicles, you will see a light bar on the roof, and in the center, there is a white strobe light. In our city, the fire and police vehicles each have one.”

Those strobes on top of fire trucks and police cars can, when turned on, put out a pattern of white flashes – which is picked up by the traffic pole sensor, and earns a “green light” for that Code 3 emergency vehicle.

Ambulances serving the town can’t do this trick, said Hanson.

There’s at least one other smart gizmo on the street – or under it, to be precise.  An “induction loop” can be buried in the pavement to sense the magnetic presence of a car that has pulled up to a red light, signaling the traffic lights that they need to change.

   But none of these gadgets does what a “red light camera” would do, said Hanson. If you find yourself entering an intersection illegally after a light has turned red, the “sensor” that gives you a ticket needs to be an actual police officer.

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Practice for college entrance tests

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

Students can practice for the SAT/ACT tests and get an analysis of their strengths and weaknesses. The event will be held at the library, 1212 Merkley Avenue, from noon to 4 p.m. on Sat., April 6, with results available at a session from 6:30-7:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 18. Stop by the library, call it at 375-6465, or visit www.kaptest.com/college.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Free: RCHS plays at Raley Field

Senior Jason Wullenwaber on the mound for the River City varsity (News-Ledger file photo by De'Onna Jack)

Senior Jason Wullenwaber on the mound for the River City varsity (News-Ledger file photo by De’Onna Jack)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER

Raley Field will play host again to a round of high school baseball games this spring. The River City High School team from West Sacramento will be at the minor league park to take on Linden High on April 13. The junior varsity matchup is at 4 p.m. and varsity plays at 7:30 p.m. Admission and parking are free; teams will be selling River Cats tickets as a fundraiser. Visit www.rivercats.com/highschool.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

When a bikini wax goes bad —

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — FEB 20, 2013 —

BY DARYL FISHER

NEWS-LEDGER COLUMNIST —

BY DARYL FISHER

BY DARYL FISHER

I, of course, have lots of friends (and non-friends for that matter) who think they could easily write this weekly column a whole lot better than I do, and one of the former had me laughing out loud the other day about something she said she had read on Facebook. She was absolutely convinced it would make for a fabulous column, and our conversation went a little something like this:

“It really would make a wonderful column,” she assured me. “Do you want me to forward it to you so you can see for yourself?”

“That’s alright,” I said, my computer already overflowing with stuff other people have sent me that they think is a lot funnier than I do. “But why don’t you go ahead and tell me about it.”

“Okay,” said my friend, already smiling. “This recently-divorced lady with young kids decided it was about time for her to stop moping around the house and start doing some dating. So she joined one of those social networking sites and soon had a date all lined up for a Friday night. So she gets off of work a little early, comes home, fixes dinner, plays with the kids, makes sure the babysitter is going to be there on time, and then goes into the bathroom to take a shower and get ready for her big going-out-to-the-movies date.”

“What’s funny about that?” I asked.

“Well, while taking her shower she quickly realizes that she has kind of let her body get out-of-hand, so to speak.”

“What do you mean?”

“Well, parts of her body had become completely over-run with unwanted hair.”

“Oh, I see,” I said, returning her smile.

“So, she goes into her medicine cabinet and pulls out this waxing kit that she had purchased ages ago when she was still married. It’s one of those cold wax kits, you know, the kind that you just rub the strips together in your hands until you get them warmed up. Then you pull the strips apart, apply them to your legs or wherever, and the hair is supposed to come right off. It’s also supposed to be really easy to do, even if you’re not very courageous at such things. But she gets the bright idea of using her hairdryer to heat up the strips, which is when things start going downhill. Anyway, although what she really wants to do is wax her bikini line, she wisely decides to try one of the much too hot strips on her leg first. Although the added heat and pulling off the strip turned out to be pretty painful, she decided to suck it up and move on up north.”

  “But why would she need to wax her bikini line if she was just going on a first date to the movies?” I asked naively.

“Trust me, women just feel better about themselves if they’re prepared for every possibility and not all covered in unwanted hair.”

“I see.”

“Anyway, she checked on the kids, made sure she had plenty of time left before the babysitter and her date were scheduled to arrive, and then hurried back into the bathroom. She took off her robe, placed one foot up on the toilet, and then bravely applied a wax strip across the right-hand side of her bikini line, covering the whole right-half of her hoo-ha. Then she inhaled deeply, held her breath, and ripped it off.”

“Then what happened?” I asked with interest.

“She went blind.”

“Blind?”

“Blind with pain! She didn’t scream, though, not wanting to frighten her children. But once her vision returned, she realized she had only pulled off half the strip, so she had to woman-up again and rip the other half off. Thinking she might pass out, but knowing that she was only half-done with getting her bikini line just the way she wanted it, she reluctantly decided to apply another strip to cover the left side of her bikini line. But in the process her foot accidentally slipped off the toilet and she ended up with the new wax strip covering up most of her butt and nether regions. Then….”

“Wait a minute!” I interrupted my friend, obviously eager to finish her tale, “I can’t possibly make a column out of what you’ve been telling me!”

“Why not?”

“Because the News-Ledger is a family newspaper and I can’t be talking about bikini lines and hoo-has and a woman’s nether regions! Our crack editor would quickly spot how inappropriate that is and I will be in big trouble.”

“But I thought you told me he never reads your stuff anymore.”

“Well, he doesn’t, but I’m sure the headline to any story like that would quickly catch his attention.”

“But if you just let me tell you the end of this story I’m sure you can make it into one of the funniest columns you have ever written! Believe it or else, she ends up taking a hot bath trying to get that wax strip off only to have her butt cemented to the bottom of her porcelain tub. Thankfully her cell phone was nearby and she was able to call a friend who told her there should be some lotion in the wax kit box for just such emergencies.”

“You mean stuff like that happens to women all the time?”

“Oh, Daryl, if you only knew what we women have to do to try and please our men!”

“Well,” I said, “it is a cute story, although I’m surprised that anyone would want to put it up on their Facebook page, and I do appreciate you taking the time to tell it to me.”

“But like I said,” I added, “I’m afraid it’s just not something I can put in my column. I do have my standards, you know!”

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

RCHS tennis off to winning start

NEWS-LEDGER — March 6, 2013 —

From River City
High School

The River City High School Tennis Team defeated both Amador and Bear River 7 to 2 and then opened Sierra Valley Conference (SVC) action with a 9-0 shutout of Union Mine to start the 2013 season a perfect 3 and 0.

At Amador, Lily He and Edward Xu won their #2 singles matches and the visitors swept all five doubles contests.  In the girls’ pairs, Sarah Yang and Sonia Bola took the top spot 8-2 while Nicole Melido teamed with Julia Quenga for an 8-0 win at #2.  On the boys side, Matthew Tagupa and Akshay Prabhakar earned an 8-3 victory at #1 and Ben Gerelkhuu and Muradan Chhay overcame a slow start to win 8-5.  Lina Vang and Amran Khan cruised to an 8-0 shutout in mixed doubles.

Up in Lake of the Pines against Bear River, Cindy Oseguera led the way with a 10-2 win in the top girls singles position and Lily He won 10-4 at #2.  Gerelkhuu provided a 10-4 victory at #2 boys.  Tagupa teamed up with Bola to take mixed doubles 10-2 and Sarah Yang partnered with Lina Vang to dominate #1 girls doubles 10-1.  In boys doubles, Xu and Prabhakar won 10-3 while Khan and Phillip Dinh cruised 10-1.

The season’s home opener was also the first SVC match of the young season and the host Raiders came out well-prepared.  Michael Lee took care of the top boys singles match 6-4,6-3 and Xu won at #2 6-1,7-5.  These were the two closest matches of the day as He won 6-2,6-2 at #1 girls singles and Bola rolled 6-0,6-1 at #2.  In doubles, RC lost  total of just seven games in ten sets.  Khan and Tagupa won 6-1,6-1 at #1 boys and Dinh and Prabhkar scored a perfect 6-0,6-0 “double bagel” at #2.  On the girls side, Oseguera and Sarah Yang (#1) and Melido and Lina Vang (#2) each posted 6-2,6-0 wins.  Chhay and Ger Yang breezed through mixed 6-1,6-0.

Next up for RC will be nonleague matches tomorrow (March 7th) at Lincoln, Friday the 8th at home against Bret Harte, Monday the 11th at home vs. Delhi, and then back to SVC play in a home match against Galt on Tuesday the 12th.  Matches begin at 4:00 p.m.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013