Tag Archives: class

River City students climb a roof and aim for the sun

    A solar voltaic panel is passed to the roof of an Alabama Avenue home, as students in the high school’s enginnering and science academy learn how to install a sun-powered system. (Photo by Al Zagofsky/News-Ledger) NEWS-LEDGER -- NOV 26, 2014 --

A solar voltaic panel is passed to the roof of an Alabama Avenue home, as students in the high school’s engineering and science academy learn how to install a sun-powered system. (Photo by Al Zagofsky/News-Ledger)
NEWS-LEDGER — NOV 26, 2014 —

NEWS-LEDGER — NOV 26, 2014 —

By Al Zagofsky
News-Ledger Correspondent

For Fay and Russell Landry, one sunny day leads to another, for on Tuesday, November 18 they received a free photovoltaic solar energy system that not only will nearly eliminate their electrical costs while contributing to a greener planet, but offered the opportunity to River City High School students to be part of their solar system installation.

The solar system installation and teaching program was coordinated by Hillary Tellesen – volunteer training coordinator at GRID Alternatives, “GRID Alternatives and the Yolo Office of Education have developed a partnership to have the River City High School students come out and learn about solar installation,” she explained. “We are funded through the California Solar Initiative and through corporate donations.”

The nonprofit works with lower income homeowners, in sunny areas, and with roofs less than 12 years old to install solar systems.

GRID Alternatives  has been working with Deborah Bruns, the science coordinator at the Yolo County Office of Education. “My role in the county office is to connect teachers with resources that help them and their students,”  she explained. “One focus right now is to give students real world experiences that might get them excited about college and careers in a variety of fields, but particularly in the sustainable energy field.”

Solar voltaic panel is placed onto an array rack by, left to right: Estefano Arellano, a senior at River City High School; Nidhi Solanki - a volunteer from  UC Davis; and Mike Scharma - the solar installation supervisor with GRID Alternatives.  (Photo by Al Zagofsky for the News-Ledger)

Solar voltaic panel is placed onto an array rack by, left to right: Estefano Arellano, a senior at River City High School; Nidhi Solanki – a volunteer from UC Davis; and Mike Scharma – the solar installation supervisor with GRID Alternatives.
(Photo by Al Zagofsky for the News-Ledger)

“I am excited about this program because I think that students often don’t know how they’re learning in class applies to the real world, and how it might apply to them as citizens, as consumers, and as workers,” Bruns continued. “I think becoming familiar with the solar energy industry is an exciting opportunity.”

“There are jobs available now and in the future, and they may as citizen consumers may one day have solar panels on their own house. The city of West Sacramento has really made it possible by putting money towards education for kids.”

Mike Scharma – the solar installation supervisor with GRID Alternatives, directed the installation and the instruction of the students. “We are installing a 2.04 kW solar array using eight 255-watt panels which is designed to supply close to 100 percent of the family’s usage,” he said. According to Scharma, the system would have cost upwards of $10,000, and would be eligible for a 30 percent federal tax credit.

Scharma and his construction assistant, Anton Muller, instructed the students in the cutting and bending of electrical conduit, the splicing of mounting rails, and the installation of solar panels.

“This program is awesome because the kids not only learn what’s in the classroom but they also get hands-on experience on real-life applications on what they learned in the classroom,” noted Sedikeh Yusufi, Engineering and Science Academy teacher at River City High School.

Estefano Arellano, a senior at River City High School climbed unto the roof to complete the installation. “This is a good project that the school Incorporated because it gives students a hands-on experience at something they may want to do in the future,” he said.

Dan Beveridge – outreach coordinator with GRID Alternatives  works with families to qualify them for the program. “I’ve been walking the streets of West Sacramento, almost all of it at this point,” he said, “trying to find clients. We are still looking to get 40 more clients this year.” Interested homeowners may call Dan at 530-680-3852.

Homeowners Fay and Russell Landry, shown above on their porch, said that both the installation by the students and the solar system were “awesome” and “exciting.”  (Photo by Al Zagofsky)

Homeowners Fay and Russell Landry, shown above on their porch, said that both the installation by the students and the solar system were “awesome” and “exciting.”
(Photo by Al Zagofsky)

Homeowners Fay and Russell Landry said that both the installation by the students and the solar system were “awesome” and “exciting.” In June 2014, they purchased their Alabama Ave. home in West Sacramento.

“I think it is very important to have collaboration between businesses, nonprofits, city agencies, and schools because students can actually be a force for change and help out on projects like this while they are learning,” added Deborah Bruns. “So it’s a win-win for the school and for the community. But it does take all of us working together and collaborating to make it happen.”

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

RCHS statistics students asked to design a game of chance

Senior Irina Onisko and Junior Alyssa Gonzalez present their casino game “Saxy Fever” which required players to spin a wheel, and if the spinner didn’t land on the instrument that was betted on, there was an option to throw a ping pong ball into the bell of a saxophone in order to win their bet back. (By Rebecca Schwartz, RCHS Journalism Class)

Senior Irina Onisko and Junior Alyssa Gonzalez present their casino game “Saxy Fever” which required players to spin a wheel, and if the spinner didn’t land on the instrument that was betted on, there was an option to throw a ping pong ball into the bell of a saxophone in order to win their bet back. (By Rebecca Schwartz, RCHS Journalism Class)

NEWS-LEDGER — NOV 12, 2014 —

By Rebecca Schwartz
River City High School Journalism Class

Every year since he had begun teaching at River City High School, statistics teacher James Colligan, has put on a ‘Casino Day’ where students used the practical skills of the lessons that he has taught them to design a casino game that will make them a profit.

Jane Griblin, a senior who built a spinner game called “Wheel of Wonderland” said, “I thought it was really fun and it was a good experience to make your own game and do the statistics part of it and see how much you could… Rig people, I guess.”

Monday, November 3rd, was biannual Casino Day. During his 1st, 3rd, and 4th period students from other classes, as well as teachers came in and played the carefully crafted games that were designed to entice students and teachers who don’t know statistics into gambling their fake money- The catch was that the house had to always win.

Colligan has been doing this project every year he’s been teaching. He had learned it from his own high school statistics teacher, who he is still in contact with. With the recent push for more hands on activities in English and Math classrooms, this project fits well into the Common Core framework.

“Common core is, most importantly, about using critical thinking skills to apply mathematical reasoning to the ‘real world’ and I think if you’re going to teach kids about probability the most interesting things you can do is to gamble,” says Colligan.

The games were varied from spinners to games that required physical activities on the part of the player, like tossing balls and flipping coins.

Shabnam Hassan, a junior who played during first period said, “I didn’t really care about the money, I just wanted to have fun… I don’t like gambling, it’s fun. It’s addicting, but it’s not good.”

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

RCHS cooks up culinary arts class

HANNAH WALL, a River City High School senior and culinary arts student, helped prep over 40 pounds of  chicken in preparation for a local event held at Yolo High School. (Photo courtesy of Cheryle Sutton)

HANNAH WALL, a River City High School senior and culinary arts student, helped prep over 40 pounds of chicken in preparation for a local event held at Yolo High School. (Photo courtesy of Cheryle Sutton)

NEWS-LEDGER — SEPT 24, 2014 —

By Rebecca Schwartz
River City High School Journalism Class

This year at River City High School they are introducing a new class, taught by Cheryle Sutton, which teaches students the “culinary arts.”

On Thursday, September 18, the small class of 18 students provided meals for more than 120 people at the Living on the Healthy Edge Program, ran by River City’s previous principal, Katie Neemer, at Yolo High School.

At the event they served student-made chicken and dumplings, zucchini chips breaded with Italian bread crumbs and parmesan cheese, and watermelon wedges with water. By the end of the event they ended up with leftovers, with which they boxed up and sent home with seminar attendees.

The night went pretty well, according to the students. Despite their lack of experience, they more than made up for it through enthusiasm and enough knowledge to put what they have learned into practice.

“Me and ‘Liz were cutting chicken on like a one foot cutting board… We were cutting like, 40 pounds of chicken,” laughed Junior Hannah Wall and Senior Elizabeth Montanez, participants in the program.

Overall the event was a rousing success. Look for their next event in Mid-October, again at the Living on the Healthy Edge Program at Yolo High School, where they will be serving Chili and deserts made from scratch.

Ms. Sutton hopes that she can portray her love for the hospitality industry that she spent 15 years of her life working in. She wants to teach her students, not only the practical skills, but the personal skills she learned.

Sutton says, “I want them to learn about themselves. What do they like? What are they good at? I want them to get to know themselves better and I want them to realize team work- how it works, how we work as a team to get something done. And I would also like them to enjoy the process in the meantime.”

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  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Basic computers: a class for seniors Tuesday in West Sacramento

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

A “computer basics for seniors” class is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Sept, 3, at the local library, 1212 Merkley Avenue. Pre-registration, library card and library PIN are required. Visit the library to sign up.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013