Tag Archives: club

Volunteers from RCHS help out at ‘Shamrock Run,’ a trot for charity

 Interact Club members Shabrina Kumar, Karishma Betcha, Phillip Dinh and (RIGHT, front to back) Vanessa Yang, Rebecca Guan, Joelle Panugaling, Gordon Au stationed near the Auto Museum in Sacramento. At the Shamrock Run cancer/youth services benefit Saturday March 15, 30 Rotary-sponsored Interactors were among the volunteers. The Shamrock Run finished at West Sac’s Raley Field. (Photo by Lily He, River City High School Interact Club. Information submitted with assistance of Carol Bogart).

Interact Club members Shabrina Kumar, Karishma Betcha, Phillip Dinh and (RIGHT, front to back) Vanessa Yang, Rebecca Guan, Joelle Panugaling, Gordon Au stationed near the Auto Museum in Sacramento. At the Shamrock Run cancer/youth services benefit Saturday March 15, 30 Rotary-sponsored Interactors were among the volunteers. The Shamrock Run finished at West Sac’s Raley Field. (Photo by Lily He, River City High School Interact Club. Information submitted with assistance of Carol Bogart).

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — MARCH 26, 2014 —

By Danny Thirakul
Interact Club, River City High School

Thirty members of the Interact Club at River City High School helped out with the Shamrock Run Saturday, March 15, which ended at West Sac’s Raley Field. The Shamrock Half-Marathon and 5k, sponsored by Blue Diamond Almonds, benefited Project FIT, a non-profit youth fitness initiative. The Triumph Cancer Foundation, a Sacramento-based registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, benefited from the 5K.

The course began right outside Raley Field and traveled as far as Discovery Park to the streets of downtown Sacramento. Participants would see the First Aid Station positioned on 13th and F St. The last station they would see before crossing the finish line was on Front Street near the Auto Museum. They would then finish right where it started, but inside Raley Field. (Information source: http://www.shamrocknhalf.com.)

Danny Thirakul, 16, is a Junior at River City High School. He is writing here of his experience at the Shamrock Run while representing the school’s Interact Club. (courtesy photo)

Danny Thirakul, 16, is a Junior at River City High School. He is writing here of his experience at the Shamrock Run while representing the school’s Interact Club. (courtesy photo)

My duty as a volunteer was to work the Medal and Water Distribution station. As were all volunteers for that station, I was instructed to check in and be there at 7 a.m. After checking in, I headed straight for my station. To my surprise, though, there wasn’t a supervisor there to tell the other volunteers and me what to do.

However, there were staff members, but they only guided us in our ways of managing the station.

Since there was no real leadership, I took the initiative in leading the volunteers and a few Interact members. After I consulted with the staff, I then instructed everyone on what to do, assigning and grouping individuals with a task. When completed, I would give them a new one to do or tell them to help others who were struggling.

The true test of my leadership abilities occurred when waves of athletes finished running. As they came, I feared the runners receiving water and medals would crowd the exit for others. To prevent this from happening, I set up mini-stations along the cool-down path. This would allow the volunteers and me to distribute more and keep the runners moving. I was very proud of my handling of the situation, even when a few volunteers had to leave.

The staff also provided great support. They kept control of the crowd and maintained a steady pace of movement throughout the event. I was glad to see the volunteers and the staff working so well together. I want to thank the staff and other volunteers for collaborating with me. I know without them we wouldn’t have done such a great job. Thank you to Blue Diamond Almonds as well, for putting together this charitable event.

Carol Bogart, an adult volunteer, adds:
A first year Interactor, student writer Danny Thirakul says he originally joined Interact Club at River City High School “for the community service hours.” Then, he says, it was “so fun helping others in need with my Interact Club friends beside me” that he wishes he’d joined his Freshman year. He says, “If I could go back in time and run for a board position, I would do that as well.” Danny describes Interact as “a phenomenal club.” Danny and the other Interactor volunteers exemplify Rotary’s motto: ‘Service Above Self.’ Through the Interact Club, Interactors like Danny become connected to the community and, in Danny’s words, enhance their awareness of the difficulties of the world. River City High School’s Interact Club is co-sponsored by Rotary Club of West Sacramento and the Centennial Rotary Club of West Sacramento. The Interact Club Rotary adviser is Charyl Silva, Rotary Club of West Sacramento. The Interact Club adviser at RCHS is Brandon Duff, who teaches English.

 

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New park honors local athlete, judge: Jerome Barry played pro baseball in the early days

The new park boasts an organic-looking climbing structure, seen in the foreground above. The light-blue ground surface is soft rubber. To the left, beyond a fence, are rail cars on a local rail spur. Beyond the play surface is the control room for the water tank (background). Notice the three “portholes” looking into the mechanics of the pumps inside the control room. (News-Ledger photo)

The new park boasts an organic-looking climbing structure, seen in the foreground above.
The light-blue ground surface is soft rubber. To the left, beyond a fence, are rail cars on a local rail spur.
Beyond the play surface is the control room for the water tank (background). Notice the three “portholes” looking into the mechanics of the pumps inside the control room.
(News-Ledger photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — FEB 26, 2014 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

On Friday, the City of West Sacramento will host a double grand opening, celebrating both a neighborhood park and a water tank station in the Bridge District. The twin public facilities are located at 809 Ballpark Drive, alongside the Ironworks subdivision and close to Raley Field.

“It’s a ‘neighborhood’ park,” said recreation superintendent Andre Pichly. “It has some play structures, swing sets and a very interactive climbing structure that’s geared toward kids about age 8 to 14. The structure has a lot of ropes, aluminum and climbing ladders – it’s probably the most unique climbing structure in our park system.”

The climbing  is located over a forgiving surface made of recycled rubber.

Nearby is a smaller climbing structure for the little ones, and a couple of little “spinning cups” that kids can sit in and twirl. There’s also a lattice-covered picnic area.

The park is right next to the control building for the city water tank. The wing-roofed control building has a couple of water pumps inside. The building and the water tank are both secured from public access, but the outside wall of the pump building has an unusual amenity:

“It has a couple of portholes in it, so kids – or anyone – can look in and see the mechanics of the thing,” reported Pichly.

The new park is known as the Jerome D. Barry Park.

The new park boasts an organic-looking climbing structure, seen in the foreground above. The light-blue ground surface is soft rubber. To the left, beyond a fence, are rail cars on a local rail spur. Beyond the play surface is the control room for the water tank (background). Notice the three “portholes” looking into the mechanics of the pumps inside the control room. (News-Ledger photo)

The new park boasts an organic-looking climbing structure, seen in the foreground above.
The light-blue ground surface is soft rubber. To the left, beyond a fence, are rail cars on a local rail spur.
Beyond the play surface is the control room for the water tank (background). Notice the three “portholes” looking into the mechanics of the pumps inside the control room.
(News-Ledger photo)

Barry was an accomplished local  baseball player who pitched for professional and semi-pro teams. He was also a rower with the Riverside Boat Club. Son of a pair of Irish immigrants, he grew up in the city’s old northern Washington township and served as a local justice of the peace from 1913-1925.

The 3.2 million gallon water tank was finished about a year ago. Tanks like this one serve as a “pitcher of water” for the city, reported the City’s Drew Gidlof last year.

“As water is taken in at the river, and treated and prepared for consumers, it is disseminated to various strategic points in the city,” he told the News-Ledger in 2013. “As the residents turn on their faucets, the water comes from their designated facility.”

The new tank is meant to help meet peak demand in the Bridge District and the Washington area near the ‘ziggurat’ building.

The park takes up about 1.5 acres, and the water facility a couple more acres, according to city sources. The water tank facility was budgeted at about $5.25 million, with funds chipped in by the state, the former local redevelopment agency, and local property owners. The park was budgeted at about $545,000, funded by developer impact fees in West Sacramento.

The public is welcome to the grand opening ceremony Friday at 10 a.m. (Feb. 28).

 

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RCHS students create ‘blankets of love’

Yakima Huerta, chairperson of the ‘Blanket of Love’ project for a River City High School student club, presents a blanket to Lola Savala (Photo & information courtesy of Charyl Silva, club advisor)

Yakima Huerta, chairperson of the ‘Blanket of Love’ project for a River City High School student club, presents a blanket to Lola Savala
(Photo & information courtesy of Charyl Silva, club advisor)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — FEB 12, 2014 —

Inspired after hearing about a project in which volunteers made scarves, in silence, for charity, the Interact Club at River City High School decided to do something similar.

  Students in the club started “Blankets of Love,” joining in silent meditation or prayer while cutting and double-knotting pieces of fleece into blankets to give to those in need.

   They were taught the blanket-making technique by Patty Gianatasio.

   The student club is sponsored by the city’s two Rotary chapters and advised by local chiropractor Charyl Silva.

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Fireworks booths for nonprofits, churches

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

Is your nonprofit or church interested in raising money by operating a fireworks booth during the 2014 Fourth of July season?

Come to an informational meeting on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 6 p.m. at city hall (1110 West Capitol Avenue). Learn about the lottery used to select winning groups, and the process of selling fireworks with help from one of the licensed commercial vendors. For more information, call the city clerk’s office, 617-4500.
Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Veterans Day volunteers from West Sac

LEFT TO RIGHT: Volunteers Walt James, Tom Engle, Roberta Firoved, Don Huynh of River City Interact Club, Carol Thomas, and Jack Chan of River City Interact Club. (Photo by Don Schatzel, Centennial Rotary Club)

 

 

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JAN 22, 2014 —

Volunteers place live wreaths on the graves of military veterans at the Sacramento Valley National Veterans Cemetery in Dixon.  Others remove the wreaths for recycling after the holiday.

This year, on Jan. 11, it was members of the Centennial Rotary Club of West Sacramento who performed cleanup duty, along with several students from the River City High School Interact Club.

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Longstanding group passes out free Christmas meals to hundreds

Helena Helmold (right) accepts a $2,600 donatoin from Tim Carnahan of the Rotary Club of West Sacramento. The donation helped provide holiday meals for those in need. (Photo by David Kamminga/Rotary)

Helena Helmold (right) accepts a $2,600 donatoin from Tim Carnahan of the Rotary Club of West Sacramento. The donation helped provide holiday meals for those in need. (Photo by David Kamminga/Rotary)

NEWS-LEDGER — JAN 1, 2014 —

From the Rotary Club of West Sacramento

For decades, a volunteer organization called the West Sacramento Christmas Basket Project has provided fixings for a Christmas meal to locals who need that kind of help.

The tradition continued this Dec. 21-22, when the group passed out canned goods; pastas; vegetables; fruit; soup; potatoes; bread; rice or beans plus a voucher for a free chicken or turkey.

Long-time organizer Helena Helmold started with the project at least 35 years ago. She said that cash donations, such as this year’s $2,600 check from The Rotary Club of West Sacramento, are a big part of making the project a success. Rotary’s donation paid for the vouchers families have been exchanging for their Christmas turkey or a chicken.

The Christmas Basket Project also distributed free toys this year.

The Yolo Food Bank this year contributed baskets to the Christmas Food Basket and also to Holy Cross and New Discovery Churches, Helmold said. She describes the well-intentioned help as “an experiment” that led to confusion for volunteers at the three sites due to “triple-dipping” by some recipients. “It meant a lot more work for us (to try to match a person waiting for a box to names of those who’d pre-registered),” she said.

Next year, Helmold said, the West Sacramento Christmas Food Basket project will go back to partnering with only Holy Cross.

This has been a tough year personally for Helmold, who is 78. Her youngest, a son, age 37, had a seizure and died eight months ago. She also lost her home of 25 years to foreclosure. The home was paid in full but not insured, she said, because her two Chow dogs – a ‘high risk breed’ – made the house uninsurable. A fire in 2006 caused by a problem with her stove meant she had to get a loan to repair the damage. Ultimately, she lost the house. But, she said, her current housing, a small temporary apartment in Bryte, “let me bring my cats.” Some days, she admits, it’s tempting to move cats and self to Honolulu for the balmy weather and to be near her grandchildren.

Work helps keep her here. This year, for example, 450 families received ingredients for their Christmas meal from the West Sacramento Christmas Basket Project.

The Food Bank of Yolo County also took 250 baskets each to Holy Cross and New Discovery, Helmold said. Helmold’s volunteers delivered boxes and vouchers to elderly and disabled residents in West Sacramento and Clarksburg, as well as to residents in local low-income housing.

Helmold expressed her gratitude to the West Sacramento Rotary Club:

“I can’t begin to tell you enough about those guys. These guys have been our life saver, they really have.”

Local businessman Frank Ramos (whose son, Dan, belongs to The Rotary Club of West Sacramento), stepped up on Dec. 20 to provide a last-minute warehouse from which the group could distribute the food boxes.

Rotary’s goal this year was to match last year’s $2,200 donation to the effort, an all time high, said Rotarian and volunteer club photographer David Kamminga. Club members exceeded that target this year by $400.

Tim Carnahan, Rotary’s 2013 Christmas Basket Project chairman, said, “No one is quite sure how long we’ve been (contributing to the West Sacramento Christmas Basket Project), but when I joined 20 years ago it was already a long-standing project for our club.”

Back then, he said, “We used to ask our members to just bring one or two cans of food to each meeting for four straight weeks leading up to Christmas. Over time it became clear that our random food purchases were hard to coordinate into the food baskets and so we began collecting cash instead. For many years (Rotarian) Dick Uno headed up this project and he still helps collect the dough when we pass the hat.”

  For more information about the West Sacramento Christmas Food Basket project, contact Helena Helmold on Facebook at http://tiny.cc/jXHaK or call (916) 804-3168. For more information about The Rotary Club of West Sacramento, e-mail Rotarian Tim Carnahan at tlcarna@pacbell.net or call (916) 997-9180.

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

 

Horsemen bearing gifts:

West Sacramento Trail Riders Association riders line up in front of Station 45’s ladder truck in Southport during their 2011 toy drive (photo courtesy of W.S. Fire Department)

West Sacramento Trail Riders Association riders line up in front of Station 45’s ladder truck in Southport during their 2011 toy drive (photo courtesy of W.S. Fire Department)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — DEC 11, 2013 —

The West Sacramento Trail Riders Association – a local horse riding group – plans their annual “Trail Ride for Kids” beginning 10:30 a.m. on Dec. 15.

Above, club members are seen in a previous year’s “Toy Ride” (photo courtesy of West Sacramento Fire Department).

This Sunday, the horsemen and women will deliver toys to the “Toys for Tots” collection site at Fire Station 45. They’ll ride from the Tower Mart on Linden Road South to the fire station on Lake Washington Blvd. near Jefferson, and you’re welcome to come out along the Jefferson Boulevard route to wave hello. The route will take the riders past the Nugget Center to the fire station.

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013