Tag Archives: elementary

‘Sport Stacking’ comes to Westfield school

Third graders at Westfield Village Elementary School intent on ‘sport stacking’ in the school auditorium Thursday morning, November 13   (News-Ledger photo)

Third graders at Westfield Village Elementary School intent on ‘sport stacking’ in the school auditorium Thursday morning, November 13
(News-Ledger photo)

NEWS-LEDGER — NOV 19, 2014 —

News-Ledger Staff

Several grades of kids at Westfield Village Elementary School took part in a ‘Sport Stacking’ exercise last week. They worked in shifts in the school auditorium, for an event that was designed as an attempt at a Guinness world record. The maker of the specially-designed “Speed Stack” cups hoped to have 600,000 people across the world doing the activity at the same time. Last year, they had 555,932.

At the Poplar Avenue school, Principal Michele Giacomini led the program, timing the kids as they reconfigured their cup stacks for speed and precision.

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Flood Preparedness Week kicks off in West Sacramento

NEWS-LEDGER ONLINE — OCT 20, 2014 —

Officials from the State Department of Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the City of West Sacramento will come together to kick off “California Flood Preparedness Week” at a West Sacramento school on Tuesday.

The event is scheduled for 10 a.m. on Oct. 21 at Westmore Oaks Elementary School.

After a news conference, there will be a chance for students, parents, teachers and business owners to talk to experts about flood protection, flood insurance and related issues. There will be representatives from FEMA, the National Weather Service, California Office of Emergency Services and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The event will also kick off a student poster contest that promotes flood protection.

 Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Spaghetti dinner to help family of Westmore Oaks school teacher

AMY MILLS has taught English and led drama productions in Washington Unified School District. She died Mother’s Day in hospice care, and friends are raising money to help her husband and two children with medical expenses from cancer treatment.   (Courtesy photo)

AMY MILLS has taught English and led drama productions in Washington Unified School District. She died Mother’s Day in hospice care, and friends are raising money to help her husband and two children with medical expenses from cancer treatment.
(Courtesy photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — MAY 14, 2014 —

Help the family of Westmore Oaks Elementary School teacher Amy Mills by showing up for some spaghetti, a silent auction and raffle on May 31.

Mills, 33, lost her fight with cancer on Sunday — Mother’s Day. She leaves behind a husband as well as children age eight and two.

According to Westmore Oaks secretary Holly Erickson, Mills was a teacher in West Sacramento’s school district since 2010. She taught English and ran the drama club, helping to put on productions of “Annie” and “Horton Hears a Who” on the Yolo High School gymnasium stage.

Her family has incurred large expenses from her medical treatment, which has included flights back and forth between West Sacramento and “Cancer Treatment Centers of America.”

Supporters are offering the spaghetti fundraiser beginning at 5 p.m. on Saturday, May 31, at the Moose Lodge, 3240 Jefferson Blvd. in Southport.

$10 in advance or $12 at the door; $5 for kids; children under three are no charge. Please bring a dessert to share.

To buy tickets, contact Erickson at spiritjunkie22@yahoo.com or (916) 842-8932.

Erickson said that donations to the family can also be made by check to Mills’s mother, Teresa Redwine, care of Holly Erickson, 1704 Lakewood Dr., West Sacramento CA 95691.

 

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Trotting off the written page

Students from Southport and Westmore Oaks elementary schools get a close look at a pair of Belgian draft horses, “Tip” and “Champ” who weigh in at close to a ton apiece. Originally from  an Amish farm, they are carriage horses in Old Sacramento. Click to enlarge.  (News-Ledger photo)

Students from Southport and Westmore Oaks elementary schools get a close look at a pair of Belgian draft horses, “Tip” and “Champ” who weigh in at close to a ton apiece. Originally from an Amish farm, they are carriage horses in Old Sacramento. Click to enlarge. (News-Ledger photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — APRIL 30, 2014 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

They called it “Horsin’ Around for Literacy.”

The regional district of Rotary International asked its local chapters, like the Centennial Rotary Club in West Sacramento, to do something to improve literacy among children. So the local chapter several months ago launched a two-pronged, equestrian attack.

Explained Don Schatzel of Rotary:

“Thanks to support from the Southport PTO (parent-teacher organization) and the West Sacramento Trail Riders Association, we bought a book for every second grader at Southport and Westmore Oaks – books with horses in them. Now, in the spring, they get horses. We’re trying to teach it, see it, read it.”

The Southport students came to Westmore Oaks (the “old” River City High campus on Clarendon Street) for a special assembly Thursday morning. On the school’s football track were a bunch of horse trailers, horses and riders.

Charyl Silva and Don Schatzel, riders and Rotarians. Click to enlarge.  News-Ledger photo

Charyl Silva and Don Schatzel, riders and Rotarians. Click to enlarge.
News-Ledger photo

Wrestling with a struggling microphone system on a windy day, emcee Roberta Firoved introduced each horse and rider to the attentive students. She also explained some things about horses, including why their eyes are on the sides of their heads (as a prey animal, horses need to keep watch for predators) and how to measure a horse’s height (by using “hands”). Among the horse teams were:

— Ron Morazzini (trail riders’ president) with his quarterhorse “Jiggers.”
Jiggers “loves to follow Ron around the pasture like a puppy,” said Firoved.

— Rod Beckwith with a mule names “Socks.” A mule is a cross produced from a male donkey and female horse, explained Firoved.

— A pair of impressive Belgian draft horses, weighing in at 1,600 and 1,800 pounds, respectively.

— And a pony.

Jason Williams, an employee of the Bureau of Land Management, showed a little bit about how he helped round up wild horses with help from his dog “Hannah.” He rode “Stinger,” a horse born wild and bearing a BLM brand on its neck. He told the kids how he used his dog to help round up a wild horse.

Jason Williams with his horse “Stinger’ and his working dog ‘Hannah.  ‘ Williams works for the Bureau of Land Management and sometimes helps round up wild horses -- animals like Stinger.  (News-Ledger photo)

Jason Williams with his horse “Stinger’ and his working dog ‘Hannah. ‘ Williams works for the Bureau of Land Management and sometimes helps round up wild horses — animals like Stinger.
(News-Ledger photo)

“If I say ‘come by,’ she will go around the horse to the left,” said Williams. Another command sends Hannah to the right of the targeted animal. Hannah is prone to giving a horse a little nip on the heels as he scoots past, helping to herd the animal.

“A lot of times, that’s what I’ll do to gather horses,” said Williams.

After the talk, kids were invited to line up on one side of a fence while the horses came by in touching distance along the other:

“Read it, see it, touch it.”

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014