Tag Archives: football

West Sac man one of nation’s oldest — and liveliest — stadium vendors

Howard Lowe shares some moves on  Westacre Road  (By AL ZAGOFSKY for the News-Ledger)

Howard Lowe shares some moves on
Westacre Road
(By AL ZAGOFSKY for the
News-Ledger)

NEWS-LEDGER — FEB 18, 2015 —

By Al Zagofsky
Correspondent

The “Nation’s Oldest Stadium Vendor” is what a Bay-area publication calls 74-year-old Howard “Crazy Legs” Lowe of West Sacramento.

While Lowe is both embarrassed and humbled by this claim, he nonetheless loves the publicity and the adoration he receives from the many fans he garnered while selling Kettle Corn in Raley Stadium and the major ballparks of San Francisco.

Crazy Legs loves to dance, and when he’s vending his sweet and salty Kettle Corn in stadiums like the Giants’ AT&T Park, and the loud speakers play out a country or rockabilly tune, he gets happy feet and rubber knees, and gets down—free styling to the music. And soon, the kids are up out of their seats shaking their booties along with him. Their parents soon follow and the whole aisle is a-groovin’.

Before the bankruptcy of Tower Records, Lowe worked in their West Sacramento warehouse, a job that had the unique benefit of periodic concerts from the recording artists. He remembers Allison Krauss, and the rapper Coolio, “who strutted through the warehouse with his entire entourage,” Lowe said. “The owner, Russ Solomon, liked to promote young bands, and he would have the musicians come out and play a set for the employees. We used to look forward to that all the time.”

A lifetime baseball addict, when he learned that the River Cats were coming to Raley Field, Lowe applied to work at the concessions—even before the stadium opened. During construction, he toured the stadium several times.

“May 15, 2000 was the first game for the River Cats,” Lowe remembers.  He was assigned to sell beer. It was a night game and drew a crowd of 15,000 people, and most of them had to stay in the concourse watching the thunder and lightning. “It was the most miserable weather. It was pitiful that night. Everybody hung out on the concourse eating food and drinking beer.”

Not liking beer, he transferred to guest services as an usher, transferred again into food service, and became a server. As a server, he would deliver meals from the kitchen to the patrons in the seating bowl.

“The first time I was doing this, I was carrying three or four cups of hot chocolate on a tray,” he explained. “I was trying to be really careful, and wouldn’t you know it—a foul ball landed right in the middle of the tray, right in the middle of the hot chocolates. I saw it coming but I couldn’t react fast enough.”

Lowe took to vending hotdogs, french fries, lemonade— just about everything that the vendors hustled, but as he started reaching his later 60s, he switched to “kettle corn because it was the lightest thing to carry.” He carries 15 to 20 bags in an old Crackerjack bag turned inside out.

While ushering and standing around and waiting, he started tapping his feet to the bluegrass song, Cotton-Eyed Joe.  “I felt the beat. I felt the music and I decided to be me,” Lowe said.  “I love people and I love music and I love sports. It just happened.”

Lowe always loved dancing, but it was at a bluegrass festival in South Sacramento Beach Lake Preserve where he became famous. “They started calling me Happy Feet, Rubber Legs, and Crazy Legs—and the name Crazy Legs stuck.”

Vending at Raley Field was tough work. “In the summers,  it can get really hot—sometimes over 100° in Sacramento, and almost as hot in the Bay area. I put crushed ice in a cloth underneath my baseball cap to keep cool.”

As Crazy Legs approached his 70th birthday in 2010, he was told that the River Cats concessions no longer required his services. Fortunately, during the times that the River Cats were on the road, he found vendor work at several stadiums in the San Francisco area.

And so, if you go to AT&T Park or some of the other stadiums in the Bay area, look for Crazy Legs, spring for a bag of his Kettle Corn, and shake your booty with the granddaddy of the stadium vendors.

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Copyright News-Ledger 2015

West Sac man one of nation’s oldest — and liveliest — stadium vendors

Howard Lowe shares some moves on  Westacre Road  (By AL ZAGOFSKY for the News-Ledger)

Howard Lowe shares some moves on
Westacre Road
(By AL ZAGOFSKY for the
News-Ledger)

NEWS-LEDGER — FEB 18, 2015 —

By Al Zagofsky
Correspondent

The “Nation’s Oldest Stadium Vendor” is what a Bay-area publication calls 74-year-old Howard “Crazy Legs” Lowe of West Sacramento.

While Lowe is both embarrassed and humbled by this claim, he nonetheless loves the publicity and the adoration he receives from the many fans he garnered while selling Kettle Corn in Raley Stadium and the major ballparks of San Francisco.

Crazy Legs loves to dance, and when he’s vending his sweet and salty Kettle Corn in stadiums like the Giants’ AT&T Park, and the loud speakers play out a country or rockabilly tune, he gets happy feet and rubber knees, and gets down—free styling to the music. And soon, the kids are up out of their seats shaking their booties along with him. Their parents soon follow and the whole aisle is a-groovin’.

Before the bankruptcy of Tower Records, Lowe worked in their West Sacramento warehouse, a job that had the unique benefit of periodic concerts from the recording artists. He remembers Allison Krauss, and the rapper Coolio, “who strutted through the warehouse with his entire entourage,” Lowe said. “The owner, Russ Solomon, liked to promote young bands, and he would have the musicians come out and play a set for the employees. We used to look forward to that all the time.”

A lifetime baseball addict, when he learned that the River Cats were coming to Raley Field, Lowe applied to work at the concessions—even before the stadium opened. During construction, he toured the stadium several times.

“May 15, 2000 was the first game for the River Cats,” Lowe remembers.  He was assigned to sell beer. It was a night game and drew a crowd of 15,000 people, and most of them had to stay in the concourse watching the thunder and lightning. “It was the most miserable weather. It was pitiful that night. Everybody hung out on the concourse eating food and drinking beer.”

Not liking beer, he transferred to guest services as an usher, transferred again into food service, and became a server. As a server, he would deliver meals from the kitchen to the patrons in the seating bowl.

“The first time I was doing this, I was carrying three or four cups of hot chocolate on a tray,” he explained. “I was trying to be really careful, and wouldn’t you know it—a foul ball landed right in the middle of the tray, right in the middle of the hot chocolates. I saw it coming but I couldn’t react fast enough.”

Lowe took to vending hotdogs, french fries, lemonade— just about everything that the vendors hustled, but as he started reaching his later 60s, he switched to “kettle corn because it was the lightest thing to carry.” He carries 15 to 20 bags in an old Crackerjack bag turned inside out.

While ushering and standing around and waiting, he started tapping his feet to the bluegrass song, Cotton-Eyed Joe.  “I felt the beat. I felt the music and I decided to be me,” Lowe said.  “I love people and I love music and I love sports. It just happened.”

Lowe always loved dancing, but it was at a bluegrass festival in South Sacramento Beach Lake Preserve where he became famous. “They started calling me Happy Feet, Rubber Legs, and Crazy Legs—and the name Crazy Legs stuck.”

Vending at Raley Field was tough work. “In the summers,  it can get really hot—sometimes over 100° in Sacramento, and almost as hot in the Bay area. I put crushed ice in a cloth underneath my baseball cap to keep cool.”

As Crazy Legs approached his 70th birthday in 2010, he was told that the River Cats concessions no longer required his services. Fortunately, during the times that the River Cats were on the road, he found vendor work at several stadiums in the San Francisco area.

And so, if you go to AT&T Park or some of the other stadiums in the Bay area, look for Crazy Legs, spring for a bag of his Kettle Corn, and shake your booty with the granddaddy of the stadium vendors.

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2015

Wise breaks receiving record for River City High School football

NEWS-LEDGER — DEC 31, 2015 —

By Laura Asatryan
River City High School Journalism Class

River City senior Aaron Wise broke the varsity football single season reception record this season with 46 receptions. The record was previously set by Malik Dumetz in 2013.

Before Malik, the record had been set by Malcom Floyd, who is now a receiver for the San Diego Chargers.

AARON WISE Now the record-holding RCHS football receiver, he hopes for a spot at the US Air Force Academy  (photo by Laura Valdez/RCHS Journalism)

AARON WISE
Now the record-holding RCHS football receiver, he hopes for a spot at the US Air Force Academy
(photo by Laura Valdez/RCHS Journalism)

“It feels amazing because I never actually thought I’d break a record,” said Wise. “I just wanted to play and have fun and work harder to try to get better.

Now that the football season is over, Aaron is setting goals for his future. He is hoping to be accepted into the U.S. Air Force Academy which, through a difficult application process, requires a nomination from a member of Congress.

“It’s a really big deal…the Academy is basically like a university but sponsored by the military. It’s really hard to get into that school and that’s why they interview you,” said Wise.

U.S. representative for California’s 6th congressional district Doris Matsui has nominated Wise for the Academy and after being interviewed by a representative, he felt optimistic about his chances at being accepted.

“The interview was great and straight to the point. During the interview it was like a college asking me standard questions. I felt comfortable knowing all I had to do was answer the questions honestly,” says Aaron.

Aaron is now waiting for a response via email about being accepted into the academy. If his hard work on the football field was able to pay off by breaking a record, Aaron is hopeful of achieving his next goal.

River City Varsity Wide Receiver Coach Mark Uy said, “I’ve never seen anyone work harder than Aaron. He worked himself to be a great football player. Great in the classroom and great on the field.”

  Do you like what you see here?

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  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

RCHS gears up for ‘homecoming’

Anamaria Rizo, 16, and Lilly Stall, 14, paint a 'We Are Raiders' poster in preparation for Homecoming Spirit Week at River City High School.  (Photo by Danny Thirakul, River City High School student)

Anamaria Rizo, 16, and Lilly Stall, 14, paint a ‘We Are Raiders’ poster in preparation for Homecoming Spirit Week at River City High School.
(Photo by Danny Thirakul, River City High School student)

NEWS-LEDGER — SEPT 24, 2014 —

By Danny Thirakul
River City
High School student

Student stress levels are off the charts! River City High School’s leadership class has been running rampant trying to pull together a successful Homecoming — a full month ahead of schedule! This year’s Homecoming had to be moved up because its original date conflicted with previously-scheduled events.

Homecoming consists of a Spirit Week, rally, football game and a dance. Spirit week is from Sept. 22 to Sept. 26. The dance is scheduled for Sept. 27. The football game is scheduled the night before the dance: Sept. 26.

Although some may think Homecoming festivities are not so hard to put together; that it’s just an event a school puts on, Associated Student Body Board Representative Victoria Visochin, 17, and Senior Class Vice President Nicholas Johnson, 17, would disagree.

Victoria is in charge of Homecoming float decorations and says there have been, “too many hours spent a week working on these floats,” but adds, smiling, “Homecoming is life. Go Big Blue!”

Nicholas stresses that Leadership “has been on an extremely tight schedule,” putting in a lot of work to get it done on time.

It’s not just stressful for the students running the event but everyone else participating. The River City High School Marching Band will be performing at the football game as will the River City High School Cheerleaders. It’s is also stressful for the students who go to these events.

Senior Cecilia Pitts, 18, will be attending the Homecoming Dance. Because Homecoming is a month earlier than usual she says, “It caught me off guard. I had to go dress shopping a lot earlier before all the good dresses got taken.”

Section Leader of the River City High School Drum Line, Michael Cano, 17, says, “The band is very much excited for the homecoming week, but some of us are a little nervous because of the short notice we were given.”

Julia Chapman, 15, is a cheerleader. She says, “We have been working really hard for the Homecoming routine. We have been practicing the routine for the past two weeks.”  She says the squad is a little nervous but when it comes down to the performance, “We’ll hit it!”

  EDITOR’S NOTE: River City High’s “homecoming” football games are on Friday, Sept. 26, at the home stadium.  The team will host Pioneer High of Woodland. The junior varsity game kicks off at 5 p.m. and varsity plays at 7.

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

RCHS loses opener to Christian Brothers

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — SEPT 3, 2014 —

River City High School’s 2014 football season opened on Friday, with a non-conference game in West Sacramento against visiting Christian Brothers.

Christian Brothers put 28 points on the board in the first quarter while cruising to a 56-7 win in the varsity match-up.

River City won the J.V. matchup 36-0.

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Soccer comes back to Raley Field

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

Soccer returns to Raley Field on July 9, when defending Mexican Premier League champion Club Leon takes on second-place Club America. Visit www.raleyfield.com or the ballpark ticket office for information.

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

RCHS athletes named ‘all league’

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER NEWSPAPER — DEC 18, 2013 —

Several West Sacramento teens have been named to the “All League Teams” in the Sierra Valley Conference for fall play.

From the River City High School soccer team, Adrian Garcia and Jesus Serrano were chosen.

In football, all-league players from RCHS are Eric Beal, David Vincent, Bo Alvarez, Alex Morales, John Gray, Kevin Burkes and Malik Dumentz.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013