Tag Archives: local

2 hurt, 1 arrested in Southport: man allegedly drove Suburban into party

FROM THE WEST SACRAMENTO NEWS-LEDGER ONLINE — AUG 26, 2012 —

West Sacramento police say a man has been arrested after allegedly driving his Chevy Suburban into a yard party on Devon Avenue in Southport. The vehicle went through a fence, causing “major” leg injuries to two people.

Police were called to the corner of Devon Avenue and Kinsington Avenue at about 4 p.m. yesterday.  According to a press release from Lieutenant Tod Sockman of the West Sacramento Police Department, 51-year old Edwin Morais “got into an argument with the resident on Devon Avenue over Stolen property.”

“One witness stated Morais had a handgun in his waistband and displayed it during the argument,” added Sockman. “After the argument, Morais got into his black Suburban and allegedly drove it through the fence at the residence and into an area where seven people were attending a party. No one was struck by the vehicle as he drove into the yard but the fence attached to the Suburban and that fencing struck two people on the legs causing what was described as major injuries.

[adrotate group=”10”]  “A short time later, officers found the Suburban backed into the driveway of Morais’ home at the 1400 block of Lemontree Road. Officers surrounded the residence and called into the house for Morais to come out. Morais came out on the porch and acknowledged the officers but returned into his house. SWAT teams were called to the scene but were not utilized. Morais surrendered after approximately two hours without incident. Morais’ wife was at home but was not harmed. Morais was arrested and will be booked at the Yolo County Jail on charges of felony Assault with a Deadly Weapon.”

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Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Convicted of following store owner home and robbing her in her driveway

NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 22, 2012 —

A Yolo County Jury has convicted 32-year-old Vincent Sloan of West Sacramento of robbing the owner of a Woodland check cashing business while the owner was on her way home from work on April 10.  The jury also convicted Sloan of hit-and-run.

After work, the victim was depositing checks at the Wells Fargo ATM in Woodland before going home, reports the D.A.’s office.  The victim, who was with her 8-year-old son, parked in the driveway of her Woodland home and was walking to her door when Sloan, wearing dark clothing and a mask, demanded her bank bag.

Sloan slapped her and struggled with her to get the bag while she screamed for help.  The victim’s husband heard his wife at the front door and ran to help her.  Sloan ran to a waiting car where an accomplice drove him away.   Sloan and his accomplice fled south on I-5 and crashed off the embankment and struck another car near the Main Street onramp in Woodland.

[adrotate group=”10″] Sloan’s DNA was found on the inside of the car that fled from the robbery.  The car was also registered to Sloan.

Sloan faces up to 6 years in state prison.  The Honorable Stephen Mock presided over the jury trial and will sentence Sloan on September 4.

  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

West Sac man: 30 years to life

WEST SACRAMENTO NEWS-LEDGER ONLINE — AUG 25, 2012 —

Yolo County District Attorney Jeff Reisig’s office announced that on August 24, Superior Court Judge Stephen Mock sentenced West Sacramento’s Dmitry Dudkin to 30 years to life in state prison for child molestation.  Dudkin had previously been convicted of two counts of child molestation in this case after pleading no contest to the charges.

Dudkin, age 27, molested an 8-year old girl from 2009 to 2011, said a spokesperson from Reisig’s office.  The crimes were discovered when the victim went to school with a hickey on her neck.  The victim told the police that Dudkin showed her pornography and asked her to perform various sexual acts on him.  Dudkin took pictures of her with his cell phone.  The Yolo County High-Tech Crimes Taskforce analyzed Dudkin’s computers and cell phones and found provocative photos of the victim.

[adrotate group=”9″]    Deputy District Attorney Sara Abrate prosecuted the case. “The defendant victimized this 8 year old girl repeatedly by taking advantage of his position of trust,” said Abrate in a press release. “This sentence ensures that he will never be able to harm this young girl, or any other children, again.”

District Attorney Jeff Reisig praised the work of the West Sacramento Police Department and the District Attorney’s High Tech Forensic Unit.

“The hard work and dedication of West Sacramento officers and our High Tech investigators was critical,” said Reisig in a press statement.  “Their efforts resulted in a plea, avoided a trial, and saved the young child from having to testify.”

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Final candidates for West Sac’s ballot:

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 15, 2012 —

EDITOR’S NOTE: The extended deadline for new people to enter the school board race passed without any new candidates signing up. So the list of candidates for West Sacramento’s city and school board elections we published below on Aug. 15 is now final and complete — with the exception that Nathan Eckler, who filed to run for school board, has withdrawn his candidacy.

The deadline has closed for candidates to file for election to the West Sacramento city council or to the mayor’s seat on the November 6 ballot. And while there will be only one new challenger in those races, he does pack some punch.

Oleg Maskaev, a resident of the Southport area, will challenge city council incumbents Bill Kristoff and Oscar Villegas for one of the two available four-year terms. Maskaev is a former WBC heavyweight boxing champ.

[adrotate group=”7″]   Mayor Christopher Cabaldon will not see a challenger this year as he seeks election to another two-year term.

Things are more crowded and less final in the race for one of three available seats on the school board.

Incumbents David Westin and Mary Leland have filed for re-election, but current board president Teresa Blackmer did not.

As of yesterday morning (Aug. 14), there were eight challengers on board for the race. Here are their names and their self-described ballot designations:

Coby Pizzotti, a “parent/legislative advocate”; Alicia Cruz, a “parent/community volunteer”; Katie Villegas, “Children’s Alliance Director”; Walt R. Bowman, “retired truck driver”; Nate Eckler (no designation yet given) [application later withdrawn]; Tamera Russel, “educator/parent”; Rene L. Guerrero, “community organizer”; and Roy Sianez, “parent/legislative director.”

Because one of the incumbents did not file for reelection, the deadline for challengers to file was automatically extended to today (Aug. 15). So this list of school board candidates is not necessarily final.

A fourth seat on the board of trustees for Washington Unified School district is also in play. Because board member Sandra Vargas has submitted her resignation effective Aug. 31, the board is accepting applications from people interested in being appointed by the board to fill her seat for the remaining two years of her four-year term.

The resignation came too late to allow the vacancy to be added to the November ballot as a matter of routine.

  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Food giveaway today in West Sac

From the West Sacramento NEWS-LEDGER —

The Yolo County Food Bank will distribute food to eligible West Sacramento and Clarksburg residents on Tuesday, Aug. 21.

[adrotate group=”9″]   Locations include the County building at 500 Jefferson Blvd. from 9-10 a.m.; Trinity Presbyterian Church at 1500 Park Blvd., from 10:30-11:15 a.m.; Yolo Housing Authority at 685 Lighthouse Drive from 11-noon; and the Clarksburg Firehouse from noon to 1 p.m.

Please bring a bag, and attend only one site. For information, call (530) 668-0690.

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Letters to the Editor, News-Ledger:

From the WEST SACRAMENTO NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 15, 2012 —

‘Well done, Char

It is my understanding that Char Ghio has retired as the Athletic Director at River City High School.

I would like to take this opportunity on behalf of the Sierra Valley Conference and me personally to say “thank you” to Char for all she has done for River City and the SVC.

CHAR GHIO, former Athletic Director at River City High School (News-Ledger file photo)

The job of athletic director is a thankless, time consuming (nights, weekends, summer) undertaking.  When athletic events take place, no one thinks of all of the hours of work that have gone into making that happen, unless something goes wrong.  If something does go wrong the AD is immediately on the hook for whatever issues occur.

The joy ADs do get is seeing kids getting to have the high school sports experience. It  makes most of the negatives seem worth it.

Char has been an invaluable member of the conference and I have had several conversations with her late at night, early in the morning, and on weekends concerning different issues of the league, scheduling, discipline, budgets, transportation, etc.  She truly was a committed AD who always wanted the best for her sports programs and student athletes.

River City High School has come a long way in the last couple of years.  They are very competitive in several sports now, and that is not by accident.  It has taken hours of hard work by players, coaches, administrators, and most of all, by a very committed athletic director.

River City High School and community has been very fortunate to have someone of Char’s character and organization to lead them over the years.

You will be missed Char!

DAVE JOHNSON
Sierra Valley Conference Commissioner

 

Reform animal shelter
Did you know the lost, stray and the abandoned animals picked up in West Sacramento go to the Yolo County animal shelter in Woodland? Did you know that West Sacramento is responsible for the highest number of animals being “housed” at the shelter?  Did you know that this shelter has a long record of poor performance (only a 45 percent “live release” rate) and fiscal inefficiency (higher cost per capita than the city of Sacramento)?

In response to these alarming statistics, a group of Yolo county concerned citizens are seeking a new animal shelter model and a commitment from city and county officials for a live release rate of at least 90 percent. There are models out there and it can be done!

How can we, in West Sacramento, make this happen? We have an unprecedented window of opportunity to bring real reform to Animal Services in Yolo County. Yolo County has commissioned animal welfare consultants to examine the Animal Shelter situation.   Their report is nearing completion and will be open for public comment shortly.

[adrotate group=”7″]   Please do a search for Yolo Coalition for Animal Shelter Reform in Facebook or  go to http://www.facebook.com/groups/342644755816399/.. This Facebook page is composed of concerned groups and individuals who would like to see many more animals adopted and less animals killed at the animal shelter.

The main function of the page is to inform, mobilize and create change, and will serve as a bulletin board for upcoming council meetings, reports and updates on what is occurring and what needs to be done!   We can do this; we need your voice to take this effort to the next level!

Now is a critical time because the County is finally seriously looking at this issue—the shelter was identified as one of the top three priorities for improvement. What needs to happen now? Community members across Yolo County must create pressure on our political leaders to create change that results in more animal adoptions and more live releases. Other communities have done this and so can we!

AMY McGUIRE, committee member of Yolo County Pet Animal Welfare Society (YC PAWS)
West Sacramento

  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

The wilderness nearby: Cache Creek

Dean Fulks wades into a pool under the Trout Creek waterfall in the Cache Creek Wilderness (courtesy photo)

By Andrew Fulks

It’s summer, 2012.

The slap, slap, slap of Cache Creek drums on the bottom of my boat as I paddle down the North Fork.  Bobbing, weaving, head down.  Branches have grown since last summer.  The North Fork is the first couple miles of the Wilderness run and the vegetation makes for more difficult obstacles than further down on the main stem of the creek.  Flows are high this year, despite the drought.  It’s an artifact of human water management.

With less water in Clear Lake this year after a meager Winter, Indian Valley reservoir is releasing more to make up the difference for the thirsty farms in Yolo County.  I have to thank the farms for this experience.  If people hadn’t changed the water regime, this creek would be mostly dry in the summer.  Makes me reflect on what it means for things to be truly ‘wild’.  But, that thought is cut short by my scanning an Arundo on the shoreline.

A quick turn, paddle in deep, pulling off on the left bank.  Arundo: also known as Giant Reed, False Bamboo, cutter of hands and eroder of streambanks.  Another human artifact.  Planted as an ornamental and for erosion control, escaped to the ‘wild’, and invades ecosystems.  Our hubris about ‘fixing’ nature has broken it.  Ironically, I’m here doing the same thing.  Tuleyome’s been battling this weed within the Cache Creek wilderness for the last 7 years, and have the infestation down to less than a handful of plants.  This one escaped my detection until now.  A quick herbicide spray, and we’re back on the river.  Where there used to be almost 100 of these giant weeds here in the wilderness, we’ve reduced to a handful.  Soon there will be none.  The system is broken, though, and hidden upstream sources will continue to fertilize our shores with little plants.  We’re in this for the long haul.

The native willows and cottonwoods sway in the slight breeze.  Rushes and sedges line the banks, forming a ribbon of green contrasting the bright yellow of my kayak.  There’s a rumble up ahead, warning of a rapid.  I’ve run this so many times in the last dozen years, my reaction is automatic.  Back paddle, pick my line, hit it straight, dig hard, and avoid the tree branch.  A Great Blue Heron unfolds his wings and heads downstream.  He’ll be our travelling companion for the rest of the trip, always staying ahead of the interlopers.  Turtles on streamside rocks give us a sideways glance.  Some are stacked on each other.  King of the mountain gets the sunlight.  Some slip into the water as we get closer.  They’ll emerge downstream on the next rock that is to their liking.

We pull off at Trout Creek.  Even though it’s summer, there’s a steady flow coming out of the side canyon.  We know the spring-fed creek will be flowing late into the summer.

We also know what’s up the canyon.  Scrambling up the rocks and ducking under the willows, we pick our way toward the sound of falling water.  I’ve been here before, and many times.  A large stream of water shoots off a rock ledge, falling vertically into a perfectly round pool.  Behind the pool is a grotto.  Water droplets drip from rocks onto ferns.  This oasis is largely unknown, save for a few boaters that follow the bear path up the canyon.  No roads, no trails.  Wild.

[adrotate group=”7″]   Back on the water, the breeze picks up.  We’re floating downstream, but getting pushed backwards.  Time for the arms to start working again.  The drumming of the water gets an accompaniment with the swoosh of paddle strokes.  The rhythm is broken by the crunch of branches.  Mother bear and her cub run up the hillside, their bronze fur rippling with each stride.  The exhilaration of seeing such a creature is replaced by the analytical mind.  Bear, check.  Turtles, River otter, Bald eagle, Osprey, Green heron, Blue heron, garter snake, deer…all, check.

Later, as we drag the boats up to the car, I reflect on the human infrastructure that was required to allow me to enjoy this wilderness.   Cars, gas, rubbers, plastics, and a sinuous serpentine asphalt ribbon.  It’s paradoxical, and uniquely human.  The artificial gets me closer to the natural.  It’s a paradox, but also a balance.  Preserving wild areas provides that balance.

  Andrew Fulks is the president of Tuleyome, a regional conservation nonprofit, and is presently the Putah Creek Riparian Reserve Manager for UC Davis, managing 6 miles of stream and several hundred acres. His interest is in open space preservation and public access.

  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012