Tag Archives: local

West Sacramento police log: crimes and police calls from the past week

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JUNE 11, 2014 —

  To see the West Sacramento ‘Police Log’ every week, just subscribe to the News-Ledger — it’s easy and it’s inexpensive. West Sacramento residents, see the special offer at bottom.

  News items below are collected from police dispatchers’ notes and arrest reports. The information in them has often not been verified beyond the initial reports.

June 1
Someone pushed in the roll-up door on a Stillwater Road food business, then stole a $1,000 laptop and $2,700 in cash.

June 4
A Rubicon Way woman reported that she had discovered a fraudulent charge on her credit card. The card had been used for a purchase in Miami.

June 4, 1 p.m.
A janitor at River City High School turned into the office a bike that had been parked on campus since September. Police booked it for safekeeping.

June 4, 5:47 p.m.
A woman gave police some checks, IDs and credit cards she said were stolen and had been in the possession of her 34-year old West Sacramento niece.

June 4, 7:34 p.m.
A 22-year old man from Drake’s Bay Road “called 911 multiple times from his cell while walking around the neighborhood. (Suspect) was found to have no emergency and was very intoxicated.”
He was contacted on Tacoma Narrows Street by police, and jailed.

June 5, 10:30 a.m.
A security officer at a West Capitol supermarket flagged down a police officer, asking him to contact a woman who appeared drunk and had just given a false name while trying to pick up medication at the store pharmacy.
The officer tried to talk to the woman, but she walked away from him and jaywalked across a nearby street. The officer detained her and put her in a patrol car. She was ID’d as a 34-year old West Capitol Avenue woman. She smelled of alcohol, “her speech was slurred and she had a hard time answering simple questions,” reported the officer.
The woman went to jail.

June 5, 4:48 p.m.
A police officer stopped a 22-year old Sacramento Avenue man who was bicycling on a sidewalk at West Capitol and Walnut avenues. The man was on probation for “assault with a deadly weapon.” The officer searched him and “located a small baggie with a white crystal-like substance in his right coin pocket on his jeans. A clear pipe was located in his left back pocket inside a brown bag. The pipe was new, and (suspect) stated he just purchased this pipe to smoke.”
The man was arrested on drug charges. The white substance tested positive as methamphetamine.

June 5, 8:15 p.m.
An F Street woman reported to an officer that a 39-year old male acquaintance had twisted her arm and later called and threatened to kill her.

June 6, 5:25 a.m.
A vehicle was repossessed from Bridge Street.

June 6, 5:40 a.m.
A 45-year old woman reported she had been jogging on the Tower Bridge Gateway when a man around 25 years old biked past her and “smacked her on the buttocks.”

June 6, 6:27 a.m.
Shots were reported to have been heard near Linden Road.

June 6, 9 a.m.
A café on the 1200-block of Harbor Boulevard was burglarized during the night:
“Suspect(s) only stole six bottles of beer,” for a loss of about $10.

June 6, noon
A May Street woman reported an “IRS phone scam.”

June 6, 1:18 p.m.
Police received a report of a vehicle in the river at Southport Parkway and Marshall Road.

June 6, 4:06 p.m.
A 47-year old transient was placed under citizens arrest after trying to shoplift $41 worth of groceries from a West Capitol Avenue supermarket. A police officer then issued him a notice to appear in court.
The suspect “apologized for taking food.”

June 6, 6:30 p.m.
Police responded to the 2000-block of Stone Court, where a 30-year old male resident had struck a female victim in the head.
“Suspect was contacted in the backyard, at which time he stood up and stated, ‘F___ you, what are you going to do?’”
The suspect then swung at an officer and threw a full can of beer at him, hitting the officer in the knee. He was eventually handcuffed. The officer hit by the beer can sustained “multiple lacerations and a swollen knee during the struggle.”

June 6, 8:30 p.m.
A man apparently dropped a gift card in the back of a patrol car while being given a ride to a local motel. The officer booked it for safekeeping.

June 6, 10:10 p.m.
A 48-year old Merkley Avenue woman left a cell phone store on West Capitol Avenue carrying a $60 cell phone.
Someone followed her from the stole and stole the phone out of her hand. A store clerk witnessed the theft.

June 7, 7:48 a.m.
A vehicle was reported stolen from Mandeville Way.

June 7, 9:37 a.m.
A stolen vehicle was recovered at Linden Road and Brenda Way.

June 8, 3:43 p.m.
Police received a stolen vehicle report from Ikea Way.

June 8, 5:44 p.m.
A hit-and-run, with property damage, was reported. The suspect vehicle was headed westbound on West Capitol at the Tower Bridge Gateway.

June 7, 6:07 p.m.
A suicide attempt was reported.

June 7, 6:40 p.m.
At a Halyard Drive motel:
“An unknown male came to the location, engaged in a dispute and shattered the window to the motel room.”

June 7, 10:48 p.m.
Someone broke into a car on Touchstone Place. They apparently attempted to steal the vehicle, unsuccessfully, before making off with seven “airless spray nozzles” worth $200.

June 7, 11:23 p.m.
A Carmichael man saw someone trying to break into his truck while it was parked at a Lake Washington Boulevard shopping center. The thief fled. A police dog caught him. The suspect was found in possession of suspected methamphetamine. He went to jail.

June 8, 2:20 p.m.
At Drever Street and Soule Street:
A thief tried to steal money from the pocket of a tow truck driver. The driver hit him in the face, rendering him unconscious. But the thief then fled.

June 8, 4:02 a.m.
Someone broke into a mobile phone store on the 2900-block of West Capitol Avenue, stole three iPhones and $150 in cash.

June 8, 9:30 a.m.
Someone broke the rear window of a car parked on Touchstone Place, stealing the vehicle registration, a subdivision gate remote and a welding mask.

June 8, 12 p.m.
A thief broke the side window of a vehicle parked at Linden Road and Snapdragon Court. The steering column was tampered with, in an apparent vehicle theft attempt. The thief left behind a club, a screwdriver and cigarette lighter.

June 8, 4:30 p.m.
In an incident on Poplar Avenue, an unknown male suspect hit a 42-year old transient in the face. The victim went to the hospital for treatment.

June 8, 8 p.m.
A drunk male transient crashed his bike at Hobson and Bryte. He went to the hospital. His bike was booked by police for safekeeping.

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Yolo ‘comfort dog’ gets $500 support

Trainer Laura Valdez with ‘Aloha’ -- a four-legged helper at the Yolo County District Attorney’s office (courtesy photo)

Trainer Laura Valdez with ‘Aloha’ — a four-legged helper at the Yolo County District Attorney’s office (courtesy photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JUNE 11, 2014 —

The Davis Rebekah Lodge has donated $500 to help care for “Aloha,” a comfort dog working with the Yolo County District Attorney’s office.

Aloha often visits with adults and children as they participate, under stress, in court. And she visits kids and parents in family law court.

“Aloha seems to know who needs her most, and heads straight for that person and sits calmly next to them,” said Yolo Judge Kathleen White, herself a member of Rebekah Lodge.

(Info courtesy of the Yolo County D.A.’s office)

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Into the drink:

Parents were summoned after this auto mishap involving juveniles in Southport on Friday afternoon  (Photo & info by Peter Folks)

Parents were summoned after this auto mishap involving juveniles in Southport on Friday afternoon (Photo & info by Peter Folks)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JUNE 11, 2014 —

Four juveniles got away with minor injuries after the car they were in went into a pond near Southport Parkway and Marshall Road. The accident call came in at 1:18 p.m. on Friday to local police.

One officer told a reporter that the four were found walking away from the accident .

The Ford Crown Victoria may have been travelling at speed, said an officer, when it left the roadway. The car lost its windshield and bumper — and took out two Italian cypress trees — on its way into the water.

Parents were contacted to pick up the kids at the scene. One of the youths had apparently ‘borrowed’ the rental car from her mother.

The car lost its bumper on its way to the shoreline (Photo by Peter Folks)

The car lost its bumper on its way to the shoreline (Photo by Peter Folks)

  Do you like what you see here?

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Not working or underemployed due to the drought? Help available

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JUNE 4, 2014 —

Yolo Food Bank has launched a program to help those in the county left unemployed or underemployed because of the state-wide drought. Many agricultural jobs, for example, have suffered during this year’s water shortage.

Through the “Drought Food Assistance Program,” the food bank will distribute prepacked food boxes during the month of June.  The program may continue after June, provided state funding is still available

The Yolo Food Bank promises a nutritionally balanced box of food -- enough to feed a family of four for five days (courtesy of Yolo Food Bank)

The Yolo Food Bank promises a nutritionally balanced box of food — enough to feed a family of four for five days (courtesy of Yolo Food Bank)

To qualify for drought food assistance participants must certify that they live in Yolo County and have either less work or no work because of the drought.  Participants affected by the drought will receive a 25-pound box of nutritionally balanced, non-perishable food, designed to provide food for a household of four people for five days.  The box will include such foods as apple sauce, canned vegetables, tomato sauce, vegetable and chicken noodle soup, peanut butter, dried pinto beans, rice, spaghetti, and oatmeal.

“We are glad to have the resources to help local families affected by California’s severe drought,” said Kevin Sanchez, Executive Director of Yolo Food Bank, an a press release.

To reach all areas of Yolo County, Yolo Food Bank will be working with six partner agencies to distribute meals at twelve sites.
West Sacramentans and Clarksburg residents may contact their local partner, Yolo County Children’s Alliance, at (530) 757-5558 or www.yolokids.org.

In addition to the 11 distributions facilitated by the Food Bank’s six partner agencies.  Yolo Food Bank will pass out drought food on Friday mornings from its warehouse in Woodland (1244 Fortna Avenue, Woodland CA 95776).  This distribution will occur from 7-8 a.m.

Contact Yolo Food Bank at (530) 668-0690 or visit  www.yolofoodbank.org.

 

  Do you like what you see here?

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  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

 

High school graduation time: both over-rated and fondly recalled

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JUNE 4, 2014 —

Another high school graduation week is upon us. Seventeen and eighteen-year old students all over the nation will be marching down their respective aisles, having endured weeks of practicing and hearing “Pomp and Circumstance” being played over and over again by young bands not always gentle on the ear.

BY DARYL FISHER, News-Ledger Features Editor

BY DARYL FISHER, News-Ledger Features Editor

Our sons and daughters will have also tried hard to write down something funny and memorable in all of their friends’ yearbooks, told a few select and grateful teachers that they are actually going to miss them, collected as much cold-hard-cash as they possibly could from all their relieved relatives, and spent at least one night absolutely determined to party-hearty until the sun came up.

No more will they be spending their noon hour in a quad or a socially segregated school cafeteria where the cheerleaders, athletes, intellectuals, those in school government, and even the hoodlums all had their special little set-aside areas where they gathered to eat and talk over their common problems and experiences. And maybe best of all, no longer will the hardcore unpopular, that unfortunate group of outcasts represented by the different, the soon to be really successful, the shy and introspective, and those too smart and wise even for the intellectuals, have to put up with a daily existence all too often defined by how cruel and insensitive young people can be to each other.

For my money, I have always thought that high school graduation (and the four often torturous years which lead up to it) is the most over-rated, and yet somehow most fondly remembered, rite of passage in a person’s youth. And when I hear someone my age say that their high school years were the best time of their life, I secretly question what kind of sadly uneventful life they must have lived.

Anyway, I was talking to a longtime friend about all this the other day and she said, “But don’t you at least enjoy going to your class reunions?”

“I’ve only been to one,” I answered, “and the most interesting part was that all the beauty I had remembered the popular girls having had somehow faded, while many of the unpopular girls had grown up to be really attractive, both inside and out. I think that may be one of those little jokes that God likes to play on us from time to time. Oh, and it was also interesting to see how most of the really tough (mean is probably the more accurate word) guys I went to high school with seemed to have disappeared from the face of the earth. I think what might have happened to them is that once everyone had graduated and got a real life, they all ended up on more or less the same street corner, with no job or future and no one to impress and beat on except each other.”

“You know,” said my friend, “I think guys and girls experience high school in very different ways. Me and most of my friends were into things like getting good grades, meeting the right boy, going to the dances, getting along with our teachers, having slumber parties, cheering the team on to victory, yelling really loud at spirit rallies, being friendly and saying hi to everyone we met in the hallway, that sort of stuff. In other words, we were having fun while you poor guys were doing all of that stupid testosterone stuff.”

Although I have very few fond memories of my high school years, I think there is one really great thing about all graduations, be it from a high school or a college campus – the commencement speeches! And for all of you local graduates who just might thumb through the News-Ledger this week, here are a few excerpts from past graduation speeches that just might be worth checking out:

“Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma, which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of other people’s opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your own heart and intuition.” — Steve Jobs

“What I regret most in my life are failures of kindness.”  –George Saunders

“You have about 30,000 days in your life. You are already down to around 23,000. Don’t waste any of them!” — Drew Houston

“You can be either a passive victim of circumstance of an active hero of your own life. Action is the antidote to apathy and cynicism and despair. You will inevitably make mistakes. Learn what you can and move on. At the end of your days, you will be judged by your gallop, not your stumbles.” — Bradley Whitford

“Being pre-approved for a credit card does not mean you have to apply for it.” — Stephen Colbert

“Listen to your inner voice, as long as it doesn’t lead to crime.” —  Lisa Kudrow

“Darling, just change the channel. You are in control of the clicker. Don’t replay the same bad, scary movie.” — Arianna Huffington

“Life is not about warming yourself by the fire. Life is about building the fire. And generosity is the match. If you want happiness for an hour, take a nap. But if you want happiness for a lifetime, help somebody.” — Larry Lucchino

“Respect people with less power than you.” — Tim Minchin

“Always remind yourself that you are stronger than you seem, braver than you believe, and smarter than you think.” — James Carville

“Your life will have many chapters, complete with crazy characters, villains and a plot you can’t even imagine as you sit here today. It’s going to be a lot like a ‘Scooby Doo’ episode.” — Shayin Alfonsi

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Civic honors for local brewpub, community college branch and more

  Bike Dog Brewery -- a minipub founded by several employees of a regional government agency -- received a city award for improving the town’s community pride. Mayor Christopher Cabaldon touted the founders as an example of entrepreneurship, as well as an example of a local government success story. City staff adjusted local zoning laws to help the brewery happen.   Pictured from left are Mayor Christopher Cabaldon, Council Member Beverly Sandeen, and brewery co-founder A.J. Tendick with his colleagues (News-Ledger photo)

Bike Dog Brewery — a minipub founded by several employees of a regional government agency — received a city award for improving the town’s community pride. Mayor Christopher Cabaldon touted the founders as an example of entrepreneurship, as well as an example of a local government success story. City staff adjusted local zoning laws to help the brewery happen.
Pictured from left are Mayor Christopher Cabaldon, Council Member Beverly Sandeen, and brewery co-founder A.J. Tendick with his colleagues (News-Ledger photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JUNE 4, 2014 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

The annual “State of the City” address on May 21 lacked any major new public policy announcements. But it did offer some perspective on sweeping changes now working their way through a growing West Sacramento.

In his keynote address to the dinner crowd inside city hall, Mayor Christopher Cabaldon touted several current achievements as well as some on the horizon. Plans to replace the old I Street Bridge are truly underway, he said. And the new urban farm on C Street is an example of paying homage to the city’s identity as a planned “food hub” as well as an example of using “infill” land for new purposes.

West Sacramento’s current building boom is not one that looks outward, said Cabaldon. It’s a boom taking place within current boundaries.

He talked about the city’s new growth spurt, bringing new urban development to the riverfront and “Bridge District” area north of the freeway. Alongside Raley Field are coming new housing, shopping and businesses.

“Our last great boom was mainly played out in Southport,” Cabaldon told the crowd. “This is a significant change in the center of gravity to our community, returning us to our roots. This is a waterfront city, with deep roots connecting us to our sister city across the river.”

The new boom is now occurring along that river, he said.

  Mayor Cabaldon and City Councilman Mark Johannessen flank Don Palm, dean of the West Sacramento and Davis branches of Sacramento City College. The local branch received the city’s “prosperity” award at the ‘State of the City’ dinner.  (News-Ledger photo)

Mayor Cabaldon and City Councilman Mark Johannessen flank Don Palm, dean of the West Sacramento and Davis branches of Sacramento City College. The local branch received the city’s “prosperity” award at the ‘State of the City’ dinner. (News-Ledger photo)

While helping to present a civic award to the local branch of Sacramento City College (just across the street from West Sacramento city hall) Cabaldon commented on the local jobs picture.

“Our unemployment is at a six year low,” said the mayor. “However, our unemployment rate is still way too high. . . It isn’t for lack of jobs. West Sacramento has more jobs than it has adults, by far.”

But there’s a “mismatch in still sets,” he said. “That’s why the West Sacramento campus is so fundamental to the future of our community, and to economic opportunities in our city.”

  Representatives of Northern California Construction Training, a West-Sac based nonprofit, pose with Mayor Cabaldon (left) and Councilman Ledesma (right). The construction group earned a city award for “service” to the community. The organization trains people for the construction trade and often participates in projects that benefit the community.   (News-Ledger photo)

Representatives of Northern California Construction Training, a West-Sac based nonprofit, pose with Mayor Cabaldon (left) and Councilman Ledesma (right). The construction group earned a city award for “service” to the community. The organization trains people for the construction trade and often participates in projects that benefit the community. (News-Ledger photo)

  Maria Simas (center) with Mayor Cabaldon and Councilman Bill Kristoff.   Simas accepted a civic award for “community” on behalf of the West Sacramento Foundation.   The Foundation has raised tens of thousands of dollars for local organizations through an annual golf tournament, the All Charities Raffle and other events. (News-Ledger photo)

Maria Simas (center) with Mayor Cabaldon and Councilman Bill Kristoff.
Simas accepted a civic award for “community” on behalf of the West Sacramento Foundation.
The Foundation has raised tens of thousands of dollars for local organizations through an annual golf tournament, the All Charities Raffle and other events. (News-Ledger photo)

Cabaldon also issued one dire warning for the evening. While he said he opposed the governor’s “tunnel” project to send water to the south state, Cabaldon maintained that at least one “tunnel” alternative was even worse.

The mayor talked about what he called the “Garamendi option,” which would pump Sacramento River water through the locks into the Port of West Sacramento’s channel, sending it down the canal as a first step in a journey to Southern California. That option would entail construction of a massive pumphouse near the locks, on the city’s valued riverfront. And, since water from the channel would be considered a drinking water source, it would necessarily lead to the closure of the port to ship traffic, he said.

This plan would be “a stake to the heart” of West Sacramento, said the mayor.

The “State of the City” dinner event was sponsored by the West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce.

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

 

RCHS soccer player Jaylen Crim leads ‘all league’ honors for school’s spring athletes

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JUNE 4, 2014 —

Sierra Valley Conference – the athletic conference in which River City High School is a member – has released its roster of “all league” honorees for the spring season.

RCHS players named “all league” for girls soccer were Jaylen Crim, Keionna Claypoole, Annie Wampler and Erin Delany. Crim was named “Co-Most Valuable Player” in the conference.

The Raiders’ Jeret Tiller earned “all league” honors in swimming.

In softball, River City’s all-leaguers this year were Brittany Baroni, Jade Chapan and Amaryssa Medina.

And from the RCHS baseball diamond, the honorees were Alex Dodd and Jesus Garcia.

Copyright News-Ledger 2014