Tag Archives: new

News-Ledger ‘letters to the editor’

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JAN 7, 2015

Liking the new bridge
As a Southport resident I have already enjoyed driving on the new Mike McGowan Bridge near my home. Not only does it shave a few minutes off driving, the bridge is a good start for diverting heavy traffic from Jefferson Boulevard.

Mike McGowan is deserving of the bridge’s name (see Mike McGowan: the man whose name is on that new bridge”, News-Ledger, December 3, 2014) for playing an important role in making West Sacramento a good place to live.

Thanks to Jay Davidson, senior civil engineer at the City of West Sacramento for addressing my initial concerns, such as cars using the bridge as a “pass through” and to the city council for promptly going forward with the project.

Keep up the good work, City of West Sacramento!

DAVID PAUL
West Sacramento

__________

Buses & carts
(Editor’s note: Author Bill Lowell speaks below about the need for a new shopping cart design that can fit aboard public buses — something like an airline carry-on  bag with wheels and a handle).

For bus-riding shoppers and retailers, a major tool is often missing: we need a tall, medium-size suitcase-shaped shopping cart which would fit between forward-facing bus seats. The right shape is particularly important for YoloBus riders, since recent insurance rules prohibit use of the front flip seats and over 90% of shopping carts, when filled, do not fit between forward-facing seats. This lack of right size/right shape personal shopping cart availability not only discourages shopping in Yolo County, but appears to be a major reason so many retailers’ commercial shopping carts are “borrowed” without being returned.

While the homeless take many such carts, retailers would greatly reduce such costs and attract more preferred customers by offering the public such a suitcase-shaped shopping cart.

WILLIAM A. LOWELL
West Sacramento

__________

Adopt a dog, cat
   (Editor’s note: although we weren’t able to publish this letter before the holidays, we thought it is still a timely topic)
The Yolo County Sheriff’s Office, Animal Services Section would like to thank our community for their on-going support for shelter animals throughout the year. Nearly 3,600 at risk animals (lost, homeless or unwanted) entered our doors in Yolo County last calendar year.  Your generosity created life-saving outcomes for more that 90 percent of them! During this season of giving and sharing we hope you will continue to help us provide for homeless shelter animals now and in the future.

Part of this effort is ‘Homes for the Holidays!’ Old policies in the industry state pets should not be adopted as gifts. This belief, however, is counter to research by the ASPCA which indicates dogs and cats obtained as gifts are actually more likely to stay within those homes, whether the pet is a surprise or not!  Help us support that theory!
If you or someone you know are considering providing a home for a shelter pet there are 11 medium to small dogs and 11 adult cats and 6 kittens which would love to be in a new home for the holidays!  Recommendations for success when adopting pets as gifts are to consider the recipient’s interest in adopting, their lifestyle, make sure parents of young children are ready to be a caregivers and their schedule will help assure an easy transition into the new home.    If you or your friends are not ready for the commitment of adopting you are encouraged to volunteer; help with fostering, shelter care, laundry, and socialization and office tasks.  Last year 429 cats and dogs were helped by our foster program; some underage and many that needed a temporary home prior to finding their forever fit.  Check out our Facebook page and if you love it, like it!

Animal Services, located at 140-C Tony Diaz Drive, Woodland is accepting donations of liquid laundry detergent; used to wash animal bedding, dry or canned pet food, especially cat food for Mouse’s Pantry, new or gently used towels or wash cloths and lap size acrylic blankets.  Toys are also welcome; for cats they must be washable and toys for dogs should be hard nylabone or Kong type; nothing with fabric stuffing as they are not safe for shelter dogs.  Tax-deductable monetary donations are always welcome; it can be a general donation or designated for such things as helping with spay and neuter or surgical needs for injured homeless strays.

Contact the Yolo County Sheriff’s Office, Animal Services Section at (530) 668-5287.

VICKY FLETCHER
MICHAEL NEVIS
Animal Services Section
Yolo Co. Sheriff’s Dept.

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2015

Wise breaks receiving record for River City High School football

NEWS-LEDGER — DEC 31, 2015 —

By Laura Asatryan
River City High School Journalism Class

River City senior Aaron Wise broke the varsity football single season reception record this season with 46 receptions. The record was previously set by Malik Dumetz in 2013.

Before Malik, the record had been set by Malcom Floyd, who is now a receiver for the San Diego Chargers.

AARON WISE Now the record-holding RCHS football receiver, he hopes for a spot at the US Air Force Academy  (photo by Laura Valdez/RCHS Journalism)

AARON WISE
Now the record-holding RCHS football receiver, he hopes for a spot at the US Air Force Academy
(photo by Laura Valdez/RCHS Journalism)

“It feels amazing because I never actually thought I’d break a record,” said Wise. “I just wanted to play and have fun and work harder to try to get better.

Now that the football season is over, Aaron is setting goals for his future. He is hoping to be accepted into the U.S. Air Force Academy which, through a difficult application process, requires a nomination from a member of Congress.

“It’s a really big deal…the Academy is basically like a university but sponsored by the military. It’s really hard to get into that school and that’s why they interview you,” said Wise.

U.S. representative for California’s 6th congressional district Doris Matsui has nominated Wise for the Academy and after being interviewed by a representative, he felt optimistic about his chances at being accepted.

“The interview was great and straight to the point. During the interview it was like a college asking me standard questions. I felt comfortable knowing all I had to do was answer the questions honestly,” says Aaron.

Aaron is now waiting for a response via email about being accepted into the academy. If his hard work on the football field was able to pay off by breaking a record, Aaron is hopeful of achieving his next goal.

River City Varsity Wide Receiver Coach Mark Uy said, “I’ve never seen anyone work harder than Aaron. He worked himself to be a great football player. Great in the classroom and great on the field.”

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

New group for West Sac seniors:

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

You’re invited to an organizational meeting of “What’s Happening Seniors?,” a new group dedicated to being active, making friends, sharing stories and finding out what’s happening in the region.

Come to the meeting from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Wed., Jan. 21, at the library, 1212 Merkley Avenue. Free parking behind the library. Other transportation available from YoloBus, YoloBus Special Paratransit and the Senior Shuttle. Call 617-2288 for information.

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

West Sac on the hydrogen highway

Ramos Oil Company president Kent Ramos and West Sacramento Mayor pro tem Mark Johannesen dispense hydrogen fuel into a hydrogen fuel cell-powered Mercedes XL. They were among a group celebrating the opening of a hydrogen fuel station at a South River Road location   (News-Ledger photo by AL ZAGOFSKY)

Ramos Oil Company president Kent Ramos and West Sacramento Mayor pro tem Mark Johannesen dispense hydrogen fuel into a hydrogen fuel cell-powered Mercedes XL. They were among a group celebrating the opening of a hydrogen fuel station at a South River Road location
(News-Ledger photo by AL ZAGOFSKY)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — DEC 17, 2014 —

By Al Zagofsky
Correspondent

While the U.S. is talking about zero emission vehicles, West Sacramento has become a leader of the pack.

On Thursday, Dec. 10, West Sac’s previously off-the-beaten path Industrial Drive welcomed the first hydrogen  fueling station in northern California.

The station, operated by Ramos Oil at 1515 South River Road, is also the tenth hydrogen fueling station in California, and only the second commercial hydrogen station in the world (the first is at California State Los Angeles).

As West Sacramento has the home of the California Fuel Cell Partnership, it was only logical for hydrogen fuel provider Linde North America Inc. to seek out West Sac to locate its first Northern California retailer, and they found a willing partner, the Ramos Oil Company.

“Our family has been in business here for over 60 years, delivering conventional fuels to the greater Sacramento area,” company president Kent Ramos said in his remarks to a celebratory crowd of hydrogen and fuel cell partners. “In recent years, we have added several different types of renewable and alternative fuels. At our unattended fueling site, we have biodiesel, ethanol, methanol, and as of today, we now have hydrogen.”

This new hydrogen station brings California closer to its goal of having 1.5 million zero-emission vehicles on the road by 2025. Many of the world’s largest automakers are introducing fuel cell vehicles to the market, including Honda, Hyundai, Mercedes, Nissan and Toyota, all of which provided demonstration vehicles to the ceremony.

The fill cap on a hydrogen fuel cell car (photo by Al Zagofsky)

The fill cap on a hydrogen fuel cell car (photo by Al Zagofsky)

These vehicles are scheduled to be available in 2015, with Toyota models available for sale, and  Honda, Hyundai, Mercedes and Nissan models initially available to lease—with monthly leases in the $400-$600 range which includes fuel and maintenance; and for the Mercedes and the Honda, it also includes your car insurance.

The station is co-funded by the California Energy Commission under its Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program.

The state of California plans to open a total of 100 stations opened across the state. The cars use hydrogen to operate fuel cells, a high tech/high efficiency device that converts the hydrogen fuel with oxygen in the air to produce electricity. The only product exiting the tailpipe is water vapor.

The hydrogen fuel celled cars have a range of 300-350 miles. The hydrogen is sold by weight as a compressed gas at pressures up to 10,000 pounds per square inch. A complete fill uses about 4 kilograms.

New hydrogen pump station at the Ramos oil facility on South River Road (AL ZAGOFSKY/News-Ledger)

New hydrogen pump station at the Ramos oil facility on South River Road (AL ZAGOFSKY/News-Ledger)

“The vehicles are very efficient because they are not combusting fuel,” explained Chris White of the California Fuel Cell Partnership. “They take the hydrogen and turn it into electricity. These are essentially electric cars that are refilled instead of recharged.”

“The two biggest benefits are that you can fill the car in about three minutes—the same amount of time that it takes to fill your gasoline car, and you have a range very similar to gasoline, but you are getting zero emission electric power transportation,” White added.

Speakers at the dedication included: California Energy Commissioner Janea A. Scott; Kent Ramos, president of Ramos Oil Company, Cliff Caldwell, vice-president of Linde North America Inc., maker of the station’s hydrogen storage tanks and compressor; Fred Joseck, of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office at the U.S. Department of Energy; and Mark Johannessen, mayor pro tem of West Sacramento.

“The station is a perfect fit for West Sacramento,” Johannessen said. “It has been the home of the California fuel cell partnership for many years. It is now the epicenter for fuel-cell vehicles. We are small, but we think big. We are very entrepreneurial in West Sacramento.”

Referring to the riverfront area around the facility, he continued, “This is all going to become retail residential, a very vibrant area.”

The California Energy Commission is providing co-funding through a competitive grant process,” explained Chris White with the California Fuel Cell Partnership. “Each one of the stations has to have its own skin in the game, so they have to provide some funding as well.”

“With this station, drivers in the Sacramento area can seriously consider buying a hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle,” said California Energy Commissioner Janea A. Scott.

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Yolo County program can help local businesses pay for new jobs

NEWS-LEDGER — DEC 17, 2014 —

From Beth Gabor
County of Yolo

Yolo County is linking up with employers to provide new job opportunities through the county’s Subsidized Employment Program.  This program, administered through the Yolo County Department of Employment & Social Services, incentivizes local employers by cutting employment costs when hiring Yolo County residents, while at the same time, assisting eligible low-income job seekers otherwise unable to find employment.

The Subsidized Employment Program reimburses participating employers eligible employee wages and unemployment insurance costs for up to a year.  This reimbursement is made possible through the CalWORKs Employment Services Program.

Jobs made available through the Subsidized Employment Program are not meant to displace current employees.  These jobs may be, but are not limited to, entry-level positions.

Since the inception of the program, nearly 15 employers have qualified for the Subsidized Employment Program and are working directly with the Yolo County Department of Employment & Social Services to train, hire and, as a result, help get eligible low-income residents back into the working “mainstream” of the community.

“One of Yolo County’s strategic goals is to champion job creation and economic opportunities,” said Yolo County Board of Supervisors Chair Don Saylor in a press release for the program.  “The Subsidized Employment Program not only assists with employment opportunities – a challenge still for many – it also helps our local businesses expand their capacity and bolsters our local economy.”

For more information on the Subsidized Employment Program, call (916) 375-6252 or (530) 661-4311.

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Mike McGowan: the man whose name is on West Sac’s newest bridge

NEWS-LEDGER — DEC 3, 2014 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

  EDITOR’S NOTE: Friday (Dec. 5), West Sacramento officials will cut the ribbon on a new bridge across the barge canal. The bridge is a few hundred yards west of the existing bridge that takes Jefferson Boulevard over the same canal. It will provide a new connection between Southport and the freeway and other points north.
  In another year or so, the new bridge will fully connect South River Road north of the canal to Village Parkway in the south.

  The bridge’s name?

  It will be called the “Mike McGowan Bridge,” in honor of the city’s first mayor.

   Earlier this year, the News-Ledger sat down with McGowan for a wide-ranging chat about his experiences and service in this city. With the planned opening of the Mike McGowan Bridge this week, perhaps this is a good time to bring that interview to you.

  We’ll present it in multiple parts starting here this week.

__________

It was midget car racing that brought Mike McGowan to West Sacramento in the early 1950s.

mcgowan michael 2014 by news-ledger  “We moved here when I was probably about five,” recalled McGowan, talking from a chair in Southport’s Eagle Café. “We came here from the Bay Area. My father was essentially a concessionaire. His business model was to sell beer, soda, hot dogs, popcorn and whatnot at different race tracks around the state.”

At the time, West Sacramento was home to a popular track on West Capitol Avenue called the “Capital Speedway.” The roar of the engines was a familiar sound in the air on Saturday nights. The speedway attracted McGowan senior.

“He liked the town, and moved us up here. It was quarter-mile dirt tracks,” said McGowan, 66. “This was right after the war, and dirt track racing was becoming more and more popular. At that time, the cars were called ‘midgets.’ They were little open-cockpit cars, mini-roadster cars. After the war, we started seeing what we called jalopies, which were modified street cars. The guys would take all the glass out, put roll bars around them, hop up the engine and cut out the wheel wells. It was the ultimate entry-level racing, very amateur.”

When the track’s owner contemplated shutting it down, the elder McGowan took over as its promoter to keep it going (and kept it going into the 1970s).

“That’s where I grew up,” recalls Mike McGowan. “That’s how I grew up – selling popcorn, cleaning the bathrooms, doing anything and everything that had to be done. It was a family business and everybody worked in some capacity.”

The track provided family entertainment, he said, although “the families could be a little rough.”

“Especially the jalopy types – but they were all good, hardworking people. It was a wonderful place for a kid. In those days, we could hire a 12 year old, give them a basketful of peanuts, and they could work all night and make a dollar-fifty. For me, it was also the place where I could watch this incredible array of mankind. I learned a lot. . . There were a lot of interesting characters on the racetrack!”

McGowan spent most of his elementary school years at Westmore Oaks Elementary School, then Westacres School, following that up at James Marshall High. He met his future wife, Sue, there. He graduated in 1966 and went to Sacramento City College.

But:

“I flunked out because I was in a band and having way too much fun,” he remembers. (He still plays drums in a popular local band).

That was during the Vietnam War, and there was a draft going on. McGowan rated high on the draft list.

“I was classified 1A, and I didn’t want to be drafted, so I joined the Marine Corps,” he chuckled. “That was a 19-year old’s logic.”

But he said the decision to join up was really a little more complicated than that. At college, McGowan had met some returned veterans and had been impressed.

“None of them had been in a war zone, but they had these great stories about being in Germany, or wherever they had been stationed. . . I believed at the time that this (war) was going to be my generation’s story. And I didn’t want to be 50 years old, sitting around when guys are telling their story, and I didn’t have one.”

“There was anti-war sentiment, there were protests, there were people going to Canada” to avoid the draft,” he added. “But West Sacramento in 1966-67 was a very patriotic, blue-collar, middle class town. VFW (the patriotic Veterans of Foreign Wars organization) loomed large in our world.”

“Most of our fathers had been in the war – not that they were rah-rah for us to go,” he continued. “My friend’s father, who had been in the Pacific in World War II, was basically telling me ‘don’t go, you don’t want to go to war.’ But at 19, I was invincible.”

McGowan was sent into the Marines and “lucked out,” he said. He was assigned to artillery, and was a section chief for a 105 millimeter Howitzer gun for 13 months, mostly in 1968.

He came home from Vietnam in one piece and turned Sue Barber into Sue McGowan. Then:

“I went to work for PG&E as a field clerk,” McGowan recalled. “I’m proud to say I was the world’s worst field clerk. It was a terrible job. I was sitting there one day, talking to a co-worker, and all he did every day was talk about retirement. I was 21 years old, working, trying to start my family. I had this epiphany, that I did not want to be sitting here at 38 (like that coworker) counting the years to retirement. I decided, ‘I’m getting out now.’”

He went back to school on the GI bill, graduating from Sacramento State and then from McGeorge School of Law.

“I wasn’t a master student, but I got through,” said McGowan. “I opened my own office January 1, 1977, just about where the massage parlor is over by West Sacramento Land Company (near Merkley and Jefferson). I wound up doing almost extensively indigent defense. I was a private attorney but I was doing public defender work, both in Yolo and Sacramento. I was doing lots and lots of trials, which I truly enjoyed.”

McGowan kept a hand in his practice through his later years on the West Sacramento City Council, and into his the first years of his service on the Yolo County Board of Supervisors. He had a partner only briefly, but shared an office at various times with Clark Cameron and with Doris Shockley (who later became a Yolo judge).

Meanwhile, what’s now the City of West Sacramento was really just a group of neighborhoods in what was called “East Yolo,” governed by the county supervisors in Woodland. It was a troubled area, and dissatisfaction was brewing. There were a couple of failed attempts at shaping part of the area into a new city.

McGowan was still in college in 1976 when one of those efforts sprouted and dried up.

“I had virtually no role,” he said. “As a matter of fact, I went to some hearings with (the late activist) Grace Ohlson. I wound up writing a paper about the incorporation.”

Then, in 1986, a new incorporation effort sprang up. This one was championed by a variety of people, including enthusiastic citizens. Developers and other businesspeople provided most of the campaign funds.

“The motivation primarily was that we were sending a lot of tax money over there (to Yolo County), and we weren’t liking what we were getting back,” remembered McGowan. “Also, we don’t need those folks from Davis and Woodland telling us how to live our lives.”

The community also was unhappy with crime and the services provided by the county sheriff’s department, and it was fed up with the “sin city” character of its decaying main street, West Capitol Avenue. That was a place were prostitutes were commonplace and respectable people didn’t linger.

“There was a growing dissatisfaction with the sheriff’s department and the way they were treating us,” said McGowan. “Rod Graham was the sheriff at that particular time and he didn’t have anything good to say about us.”

Also, McGowan said, “there’s no question that development – the monied interests that are here – wanted to have greater influence over the governing body and would rather have a group of local policy makers than have to go to Woodland and Davis to get their stuff approved. . . This successful incorporation was, as you know, significantly backed by development money and the business community – (Frank) Ramos, (Tom) Raley. Those folks over here, for a variety of reasons that were not all self-serving. But certainly there was a feeling that hey, we want to have our own team here to work with.”

McGowan gives credit to people like County Supervisor Clark Cameron (an “unsung hero” of the effort) and Jake Misfedt (who actually “wasn’t a fan of incorporation”) for paving the way for the separate communities of Bryte, Broderick, “old” West Sacramento and Southport to become one city. They laid groundwork including arranging a county incorporation study and consolidating the various communities’ water and fire services.

Cameron also helped create a “redevelopment agency” in what later became West Sacramento, drawing out a large mapped-out area which would help keep in more of its property tax money local to pay to fight blight. The city kept that agency until recently, and although some aspects of it were controversial, the redevelopment agency helped to fund many of the city’s bridges, roads and other infrastructure.

“There was an evolution, then there was a revolution,” said McGowan.

At the same time voters were asked to vote up or down on incorporation in November of 1986, they were asked to choose from a slate of candidates who would serve as the first five people on the city council.

“It was a beauty contest – a popularity contest,” he remarked with a chuckle.

McGowan was on that list, and he drew the most votes. Does that mean he won the beauty contest?

“Go figure that one out!,” he answered.

Today’s elections in West Sacramento are fairly sophisticated, with money raised and spent and most of the campaigning done with mailers and other impersonal communication. Then, it was different.

“I wasn’t politically involved when I ran for city council,” said McGowan. “I was sitting there watching everybody else sign up for this thing. I was thinking, ‘I know this guy, I know that guy, I can do a better job than they can.’ And I thought it would be fun. I’d do one term and get out.”

As for some of the other candidates:

“Ben Davis was the only candidate who ran opposed to incorporation, but he wasn’t able to articulate that in a very effective way,” McGowan remembers. “And then Mike Zimmerman, a barber, was in it, Fred Pierini was in it, Bob Mahalisin was in it – it was 21 people It was the best campaign I’ve ever been in. We were making it up, no one knew what they were doing.”

“We’d go to candidates’ nights,” he recalled. “There were about 12 or 13 of us who were serious, and we’d go to the candidates forums and then we’d all go to dinner afterwards, and say ‘yeah, I got you on that one!’ and ‘yeah, you didn’t know the answer to that question, but I did!’ And then on election night, instead of going to our own little camps, we all went to the El Rancho (a hotel near the current city hall) and watched the results come in together. It was entirely different atmosphere.”

Turnout was high, and incorporation passed with an approval rating that was “off the charts.”. The new council was scheduled to take office and take charge of a city just a half-year later – in January, 1987. Questions about everything from land uses to policing would fall on their laps. The other council members-elect agreed that McGowan, top vote-getter in that election, would be the first mayor.

“Being the first mayor, to this day, is the most fun I ever had,” said McGowan. “It was fantastic.”

  Next week: Finding some police, fighting zoning wars. 

The new bridge is sited off to the right in this modified City map. It will cross the barge canal from South River Road from the north. Eventually, it will connect with Village Parkway. Construction may start on that extension sometime after mid-summer of next year.

The new bridge is sited off to the right in this modified City map. It will cross the barge canal from South River Road from the north.
Eventually, it will connect with Village Parkway. Construction may start on that extension sometime after mid-summer of next year.

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Consider new West Sac news, radio & internet nonprofit in your giving plans

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Preserve the legacy.

Make sure West Sacramento is served by a first-class local newspaper and
information source for decades to come.A West Sacramento nonprofit group has tasked itself with creating a unique community-run news organization.

The new organization will use print media, radio and the internet to serve this community into the future. It will start from the traditions of pioneering West Sacramento journalist Julius Feher, the late founder of the News-Ledger.

You can help.

As the tax year ends, and as you consider your estate plans, please think about making a tax-deductible gift for the future of West Sacramento journalism. Your gift may help create a vigorous new news hub for your city as well as support the teaching of journalism skills in local schools and college classrooms.

You can help ensure that the tradition started by Julius Feher and the News-Ledger over 50 years ago continues -- better than ever, through a community-run multi-media nonprofit. Copyright News-Ledger 2014

You can help ensure that the tradition started by Julius Feher and the News-Ledger over 50 years ago continues — better than ever, through a community-run multi-media nonprofit.
Copyright News-Ledger 2014

What can you do?

— Write a tax-deductible check to “West Sacramento Neighbors Fair, Inc.”

—  Maximize your tax deductions now by giving gifts of cash, bonds or appreciated assets such as stocks or real estate.

—  Pursue tax advantages while protecting your security by using options like Charitable Gift Annuities, a Charitable Remainder Trust or Charitable Lead Trust.

—  Create a Donor Advised Fund and help decide how your major donation is used – while achieving maximum tax advantages.

—  Make a bequest, and leave a legacy.

JULIUS FEHER, the late founder of the News-Ledger, was respected for his sense of fairness in journalism and for his commitment to his hometown, West Sacramento  (Copyright News-Ledger 2014)

JULIUS FEHER, the late founder of the News-Ledger, was respected for his sense of fairness in journalism and for his commitment to his hometown, West Sacramento
(Copyright News-Ledger 2014)

Talk to your tax adviser and contact us about how to help our West Sacramento media and journalism project. Your gift may be publicized; let us know if you’d prefer not.

West Sacramento Neighbors Fair, Inc.
BOARD MEMBERS: Wesley Beers, President; Jim Brewer, V.P..;  Joe Goeden, Treasurer; Jolaine Beers, Secretary;  Charlotte Dorsey; Rick Hart; John Siden; J.P. Singh; Gina Spadafori

West Sacramento Neighbors Fair, Inc., 1040 West Capitol Ave., Suite B, West Sacramento CA 95691 (Tax ID 56-2311088)
Contact: Steve Marschke, c/o The News-Ledger;  (916) 371-8030 ; steve@news-ledger.com

Copyright News-Ledger 2014