Tag Archives: new

Register for kindergarten Saturday

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

West Sacramento’s local elementary schools will accept registration for kindergarten and transitional kindergarten students on Sat., Feb. 23, from 9 a.m. to noon. Bring your child’s birth certificate, social security card, immunization records, proof of physical (dated after Aug., 2012, for kindergarten students) and a copy of your PG&E bill for address verification, to your local campus. For kindergarten, child’s fifth birthday must be on or before Oct. 1, 2013.

Questions? Contact Bridgeway Island Elementary at 375-7778; Elkhorn at 375-7670; Riverbank at 375-7700; Stonegate at 375-0960; Southport at 375-7890; Westfield at 375-7720; or Westmore Oaks at 375-7730.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

False alarms are going to cost you

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JAN 30, 2013 —

City officials announced this month that, beginning March 1, those responsible for more than two false police alarms within a year will accrue a false alarm fine.

The local police department responded to over 3,000 false alarms (over 99 percent of all alarm calls) last year, it reports.

Penalties for the third and fourth false alarms within a year are $200 each. With the fifth false alarm comes a $200 fine plus suspension of the alarm permit.

Reinstating a permit will cost $250.

[adrotate group=”9″] If you or your alarm company cancel an alarm before a police officer arrives, the alarm won’t count.

The City of West Sacramento has contacted with “Public Safety Corporation/Cry Wolf” to administer the permits and false alarm notifications.

For more information, go to the city website at www.cityofwestsacramento.org (go to “How do I” and then “Apply for” and “Alarm permit”) or call 1-855-694-8281 to obtain an alarm permit or learn more.

Alarms without a permit may draw a $100 fine.

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Water tank paired with park

The tank as it looked on Monday, plastic-wrapped to trap dust and chemicals during final painting and coating. Behind the tank is part of the 'Ironworks' subdivision. (News-Ledger photo)

NEWS-LEDGER — JAN 16, 2013 —

New water tank will be painted in colors echoing the nearby ‘Ironworks’ subdivision close to Raley Field. 

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

That “shrink-wrapped” globule off to the north of the Pioneer Bridge at US 50 is West Sacramento’s latest water storage tank. It’s soon to be finished and filled. Then it will be surrounded by a small neighborhood park.

Underneath the plastic wrap is a new, 3.2 million gallon water tank.  The wrapping and scaffolding around the tank are there to protect air quality while the tank is prepped for use.

“They go through a procedure where they sandblast the material to prep it, then spray the next layer of paint, and then repeat, so the paint will adhere to the prior layer of paint,” reports project manager Drew Gidlof, constructions operation manager for the City of West Sacramento. “They put up a bunch of scaffolding and then sheets of plastic. Then they heated it so all the seams would adhere to each other and it would be pretty much airtight.”

West Sacramento pulls water from the Sacramento River and treats it at the Bryte Bend Water Treatment Plant, on the northern edge of the city.

[adrotate group=”9″]   Gidlof explained that storage tanks like this serve as a neighborhood’s “pitcher of water.”

“As water is taken in at the river, and treated and prepared for consumers, they disseminate it to various strategic points in the city,” he said. “As the residents turn on their faucets, the water comes from their designated (storage) facility.”

Having water ready to go helps meet the daily peaks of demand.

The new tank is designed to help with drinking water and fire protection around the “Bridge District” neighborhood (under development north of the freeway) and Washington area (near the ziggurat).

Artist’s rendering of the finished park on Ballpark Drive. Right now, the plastic-shrouded water tank can be seen by commuters returning from Sacramento on the US 50 bridge over the Sacramento River. (courtesy of Carollo Engineering/City of West Sacramento)

  Other storage tanks are located around town.

This particular tank is built a little taller and skinnier than most, in order to minimize its footprint in its little two-acre park site next to the Ironworks subdivision.  Next to the new tank is a control building with several water pumps in it.

The facility will be painted in colors that echo Ironworks – including burgundy, gold and white – and the tank will be strategically backlit at night.

“The tank has also been strategically designed so that if and when the opportunity presents, we can quickly install a solar panel on top,” said Gidlof.

The surrounding park totals about two acres.  “There’s going to be a series of play structures for children, picnic areas, and walkways,” said Gidlof. Thematic elements in the park will reflect the concept of “water” in their design.

The little park will be joined by other parks in the Bridge District as well.

How much does all this cost?

Katie Jacobson, a senior program manager for the city, said the water tank is budgeted around $5.25 million. About $2.8 million comes from state grant funds, $1.8 million from West Sacramento’s former redevelopment agency (property tax increment) and $700,000 from property owners served by the tank.

The project is located at 809 Ballpark Drive, and it was begun in September, 2011. The contractor is RSH, and the tank subcontractor is Paso Robles Tank. West Coast Industrial Coating is in charge of coating the inside of the water tank.

The park will cost about $545,000, paid for by development impact fees received by the City of West Sacramento.

The water tank is scheduled to be finished this month, and the park is planned to be complete by July.

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  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Old ‘Bakers Square’ site is reborn

When the Bakers Square restaurant change went under, the chain’s former West Sacramento property became a ward of the state -- which was expanding the nearby freeway interchange -- and then the City. It has since been sold to a Denny’s franchisee. Above is owner Bobby Chao (center, fifth from left). Some of those with him at the official grand opening on Dec. 3 were Chamber of Commerce CEO Denice Seals (third adult from left) and Mayor Christopher Cabaldon (fourth from left). Third from right is Charline Hamilton, city community development director; second from right is Diane Richards of the city’s economic development department. (News-Ledger photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JAN 2, 2013 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

After being vacant for a couple of years, the former “Bakers Square” restaurant on Harbor Boulevard is once more pouring coffee and flipping flapjacks – this time underneath a “Denny’s” banner.

The re-opening marks the end of a troubled few years for the property. At the same time the Bakers Square brand was fighting financial problems (the chain filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2008), CalTrans was working on plans to expand the interchange next door to the West Sacramento restaurant site – a project which would affect access to the local Bakers Square.

The West Sacramento Bakers Square was among those closed down by the parent company. CalTrans made a deal for the restaurant property first, easing the way for the interchange.

Then it changed hands again.

“In the course of transferring some City right-of-way to be used for that highway project, the city ended up acquiring a piece of that property,” said Louise Collis, a senior program manager for the City of West Sacramento. But putting the old restaurant in new hands wasn’t easy.

[adrotate group=”7″] “It was not a good time for a new restaurant to open up,” said Collis. “We ended up getting the property at the height of the recession.”

Enter Bobby Chao, who was operating the Denny’s restaurant on Lake Road in West Sacramento (near Enterprise Boulevard) as well as a Denny’s in Galt.

“He purchased it so he could expand his (local) Denny’s,” said Collis. “It’s over 30 percent larger than his old Denny’s in West Sacramento.”

Chao bought most of the old Bakers Square site for about $850,000 she said.

“He put over $400,000 of rehab into it. We were really pleased he was willing to invest that kind of money into it. That’s a really important entry to the city off of Highway 50.”

Chao said he ended up investing even more money into the building’s rehabilitation.

“I put in all new equipment, all new furniture, and painted inside and out,” Chao told the News-Ledger. “Every piece of equipment we’re using is brand-new. Basically it’s a brand-new restaurant. $400,000 was just the cost of the equipment – it doesn’t include the construction costs.”

The new Denny’s opened in late November, and Chao has vacated his lease on Lake Road.

How’s business at 1235 Harbor?

“So far, it’s good,” said Chao. “We’re significantly up – over 50 percent up over previous years at the previous location. It’s a new location and I’m very happy the community has supported it.”

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

High school class looks at cityhood

NEWS-LEDGER, NOV 28, 2012: Members of a panel gathered at River City High School Nov. 14 to recall the effort of creating the City of West Sacramento, which culminated in a successful vote in 1986: Dan Ramos, businessman; Louisa Vessell, activist; Loren Fourness, president of the incorporation committee; Michael McGowan, the city’s first mayor; Bill Kristoff, also elected to the first city council; and Carol Richardson, assistant city manager. The panel talked about their perceptions of the struggle to incorporate and answered questions from history students. (photo by Charlotte Dorsey)

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Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Coat drop-off drive through today

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

Take part in a “drive-through blitz” from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Dec. 8 by bringing your new or gently-used coats to River City High School, 1 Raider Lane for collection. The school’s music boosters are sponsoring the collection for “Coats for Kids,” and “Hot 103.5” radio will be on hand.

[adrotate group=”7″]  News10’s Coats for Kids program returns this winter, asking you to donate a new or gently used coat of any size which will be distributed to those in need. Ongoing donation sites include UPS Stores (there is one near Nick’s Diner at Harbor & West Capitol), Swanson’s Cleaners or the News10 studio before December 14. To make a financial contribution, send a check payable to “Coats for Kids” at The Salvation Army, PO Box 340699, Sacramento CA 95834. For info, call 321-3362.

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

New use for old fast food site? West Sac ponders ‘incubator’ for restaurants

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — NOV 21, 2012 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

West Sacramento leaders are working on a project that would turn an old fast food restaurant somewhere in town into an “incubator” for restaurant startups.

Christopher Cabaldon, Mayor of West Sacramento (News-Ledger file photo)

“Our idea was to convert an old fast-food joint into a demonstration of how healthy, locally grown food could be produced and sold,” Mayor Christopher Cabaldon told the News-Ledger. “We can provide opportunities for aspiring restaurateurs who want to produce healthy food, but do it without quitting their jobs and taking out a huge loan. Here’s the hardest part – if you want to start a restaurant – and we certainly need more restaurants in West Sacramento – unless you’re a chain, it’s very difficult.”

You can’t even start out cooking commercially from your home kitchen, he added. You’d need a commercial, government-approved facility. And it’s expensive to take on that kind of overhead for a risky new restaurant.

“Most consumers expect you to be there most nights a week, so you’re really talking about quitting your job and taking an enormous leap.”

So West Sacramento envisions a “Farm to Fast Food” facility that would support several new ventures at a time. The yet-unchosen site would also be a place for local farmers to sell their produce to the public.

“The (restaurants) would have different themes and different operators throughout the week,” said Cabaldon.

The city’s goal is to encourage “reasonably healthy” fast food alternatives in West Sacramento.

“Fast food exists and it thrives because it meets the needs of a lot of households, who don’t necessarily have time to cook a family meal.”

The goal would be for these new restaurants to try to be successful at the shared “incubator” facility before taking the next step, graduating and moving on to become self-supporting somewhere else.

As a mini-farmers market, he said, the new facility would also support small-scale, urban farming such as that being done by Dan Gannon and his Humble Roots farm in West Sacramento.

[adrotate group=”7″] “The Eatery (restaurant) builds its menu partly on what’s available from Humble Roots, and Humble Roots knows it has that market.”

The city government just entered their “Farm to Fast Food” proposal into a contest sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies of New York (that city’s mayor is Michael Bloomberg). The competition offered a $5 million prize and four $1 million prizes to cities with innovative ideas for tackling national issues.

West Sacramento recently learned it wasn’t among the winners in that contest.

“No cities our size were among the winners,” said Cabaldon. But he still believes in the project.

“There are abandoned or failing fast-food drive-throughs on commercial strips all over the country. This idea was generated by a creative visioning session from a lot of local stakeholders, including farmers and restaurateurs.”

These stakeholders are scheduled to meet again within the next couple of months, and keep working on trying to make “Farm to Fast Food” a reality in West Sacramento, said the mayor.

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012