Tag Archives: new

Marijuana-growing restrictions in West Sacramento: follow-up

NEWS-LEDGER — DEC 18, 2013 —

An online reader of the News-Ledger complained that our Dec. 4 article detailing proposed new restrictions on growers of medical marijuana lacked enough context.

The article included a reference to data collected in West Sacramento since 2008. And it included a quote from a city staff report saying, in part, that “the number of complaints that specifically identify marijuana has doubled every year to 2012.”

The reader wanted to know if all that “doubling” had added up to a significant number of complaints – or if it was just a matter, say, of doubling just from “one” to “two.”

Here’s some more information:
According to the staff report, the city received 22 “marijuana related” complaints in 2008, rising to 112 complaints in 2012 and slipping to 92 in 2013.

The city received six calls for service regarding marijuana cultivation in 2008, rising to 27  calls in 2013.

Police were not called to any crime scenes involving marijuana cultivation in 2008, but did respond to five such calls in both 2012 and 2013.

To see the full report, look for the Dec. 5 agenda of the city planning commission at the city’s website. The report is at:

http://www.cityofwestsacramento.org/civica/filebank/blobdload.asp?BlobID=9922

The planning commission on Dec. 5 approved the proposed new restrictions, commission member Charlie Moore told the News-Ledger. The rules would limit the size of indoor marijuana growing, prohibit cultivation within 600 feet of a school or child care center, and impose other requirements. The City of West Sacramento already prohibits outdoor marijuana cultivation.

The proposed new restrictions will return to the city council for a final vote.

The News-Ledger’s earlier article about this proposed ordinance can be found here.

 

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Nonprofit applies for new FM radio station license in West Sacramento

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — DEC 18, 2013 —

FM 92.9 would be part of effort to create a grassroots media organization for West Sac

(EDITOR’S NOTE: The News-Ledger and its editor, Steve Marschke, are a part of the effort described below. Volunteers are attempting to create a grassroots, nonprofit news center to serve West Sacramento into the future.)

A West Sacramento nonprofit group has filed an application with the FCC to create a local, low-power FM radio station in West Sacramento. The group has asked for authorization to use bandwidth at 92.9 on the dial.

WES BEERS: president of nonprofit that just applied for a low-power FM radio license in West Sac (News-Ledger file photo)

WES BEERS: president of nonprofit that just applied for a low-power FM radio license in West Sac
(News-Ledger file photo)

What kinds of shows might be aired at the new station?

“We’re hopeful in three areas,” said Wes Beers, a project proponent. “One is to bring a lot more community-based news to West Sacramento. The second is to partner with the city (government) in part to be available for emergency broadcasting, but also to broadcast items of interest to the city. Last, and maybe the most fun and exciting part, would be to work with the schools to broadcast school news and partner with them academically to enrich their broadcasting and journalism programs.”

The partnerships could involve River City High School and the local branch of the Sacramento City College, said Beers.

“They could broadcast school basketball games, football games, swim meets – and I think there’s an ability to ‘stream’ these broadcasts to the internet,” he added.

The City of West Sacramento paid the $2,000 consulting fee to a Davis-based nonprofit that assembled this radio station application. The application included an engineering study intended to show the new station would not interfere with existing stations that are nearby on the map and also nearby on the dial.

What does the city government want for its investment?

“Their interest, I think, is twofold,” said Beers. “They believe that having another form of communication to the community for an emergency situation would be a vital resource. And secondly, I think they’re excited about having the opportunity to enrich the community and the schools.”

The radio station application process can be competitive, and the Federal Communications Commission hasn’t yet responded to the application. But the names of all the other applicants have been released, and it doesn’t appear that anyone else in the region has submitted a conflicting claim for the same bandwidth.

The new radio proposal came out of a project to create a nonprofit news and information organization.

Beers, a former West Sacramento mayor and city councilman, began meeting in 2012 with the News-Ledger and various local citizens interested in starting a local, nonprofit media group.

“So much of our news is fed to us by bigger and bigger corporations, and this will keep and maintain an opportunity for a local perspective,” said Beers.

The group learned in July that the FCC would shortly accept applications for new low-power FM radio licenses – a relatively rare offering from the feds. Local volunteers, including Jim Brewer (who is also active in the local historical society and a Bryte/Broderick area community group) quickly scrambled to hit the FCC’s application deadline.

Meanwhile, this same group of eight volunteers became the new board of the West Sacramento Neighbors Fair, Inc. — an existing nonprofit in West Sac.

The Neighbors Fair organization was winding down its mission of bringing an annual community fair to West Sacramento, and its former leaders invited the new blood to take the helm and pursue a new type of “educational” nonprofit mission.

The new board is now starting to “repurpose” that nonprofit, said Beers.

It’s the West Sacramento Neighbors Fair nonprofit that filed for the radio license last month. Its new board members include Beers, his wife Jolaine Beers, Brewer, retired city manager Joe Goeden, Charlotte Dorsey, Carrie Fisher, John Siden and Gina Spadafori.

In Davis, the community radio station (“KDRT”) shares a building with a public access cable TV production facility.

The West Sacramento nonprofit is exploring a vision that could include print and online news, cable TV features, online streaming of video and audio, and the proposed radio station.

But all that is still in its planning stages.

West Sacramento is already home to KJAY radio at AM 1430. According to its website, KJAY brings the Sacramento region programming that includes Hmong-language features, religious programs and “international” content. KJAY is located in rural Southport.

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

West Sac joins Davis cemetery district

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — NOV 27, 2013 —

Residents of East Yolo get a slightly-preferred rate to use services at the Davis public cemetery

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

Sure, you want to live the rest of your life in West Sacramento. But where do you want to go after that?

West Sacramento doesn’t have a cemetery. But options for city residents looking for a final resting place became a little bit more attractive earlier this year when West Sacramento and Clarksburg joined the Davis Cemetery District. The expansion of this special governmental district came after a study by Yolo County’s Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCo) and the approval of the Yolo County Board of Supervisors.

A News-Ledger reporter dropped in on the Davis cemetery this week, finding a sunny day replete with wild turkeys and a guinea hen strolling among the headstones. The cemetery is located along Pole Line Road in East Davis.

Gathered on the grounds of the Davis cemetery: Superintendent Joseph Cattarin,  Office Manager Susan Finkleman and Community Outreach Director Joseph Finkleman. The cemetery includes gardens, wildlife and the only natural hill (“swale”) in that city, reports Joseph Finkleman.  (News-Ledger photo)

Gathered on the grounds of the Davis cemetery: Superintendent Joseph Cattarin, Office Manager Susan Finkleman and Community Outreach Director Joseph Finkleman. The cemetery includes gardens, wildlife and the only natural hill (“swale”) in that city, reports Joseph Finkleman.
(News-Ledger photo)

Joseph Finkleman, community outreach director for the public cemetery, explained that until recently, its district was much smaller.

“It was just Davis, El Macero and a few chunks of dirt contiguous to Davis,” said Finkleman. “LAFCo did their every-five-year review of our agency, and in the process of the review, they looked at East Yolo, which had no special (cemetery) district. There will never be a cemetery there because of the (high) water table.”

So the county decided to draw Clarksburg and West Sacramento into the map.

While Davis land pay a small amount of property tax to support the cemetery (it amounts to about $2.50 per year per resident, said Finkleman), West Sacramento and Clarksburg residents won’t see their property taxes routed the same way. Instead, residents of this new part of the district will see “Tier 2” pricing when they shop for a spot at the cemetery.

“They will pay $250 – a one-time fee – regardless of the number of plots they’re arranging for,” said Finkleman. “Our lowest-end service is a scattering (of ashes) in our cemetery. We have scattering gardens, and we actually place the cremains in as many flower gardens as we can. There’s also a memorialization included – a very small stone about brick-sized. That’s $440, plus the $250 fee (for residents from new areas of the district).”

A traditional single burial with a Titan “fully-sealed” container costs $4,886 for the same customers.

The cemetery also offers other services – including a “green burial” in which the body is encouraged to “return to the earth” in a biodegradable container or shroud ($4,057).

“Green burial is one of the only reasons people with no affinity for this cemetery district would want to be buried here,” added Susan Finkleman, the cemetery’s office manager. “We are one of the few public cemeteries that will do green burials.”

The “public” Davis cemetery will accept clients from outside the district, for a $500 additional fee instead of the $250 fee to be paid by West Sacramento and Clarksburg clients. All fees include an “endowment” charge that go into a fund meant to keep maintaining the cemetery even after it is filled and closed.

“We sit on 28 acres,” said Finkleman. “We have almost 20 acres of undeveloped land. At the rate we’re utilizing the cemetery, we have enough space for somewhere between 300 and a thousand years.”

Finkleman said he believes the prices at the Davis Cemetery are generally lower than those at private facilities (Susan Finkleman reports that 45 percent of its budget is subsidized by property taxes). As a public cemetery, the Davis facility has no funeral home of its own, no above-ground mausoleums and does not allow separate burial of pets – although Fido’s ashes can sometimes be included along with his owner’s burial if desired.

The facility boasts several flower gardens, a labyrinth, an arboretum, indoor rotating art galley and abundant wildlife.

For more information, visit www.daviscemetery.org, call (530) 756-7807 or email cemetery@dcn.org.

 

  Do you like what you see here?

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  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

 

Work underway on West Sac trail

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — NOV 27, 2013 —

The City of West Sacramento has started work on a new, dedicated bicycle and pedestrian trail.

The Clarksburg Branch Pedestrian and Bike Trail will be improved between South River Road and an access point at Cherokee Road, south of River City High School in Southport. The project will include installation of pavement over an existing trail, with access trails, sidewalk, curb ramps, signage, striping and related improvements.

The project will be done in 30 to 45 days, depending on weather, reports city spokesman Art Schroeder.

You can see the city’s existing and planned bike and pedestrian trail network at this earlier News-Ledger web posting here.

 

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013