Tag Archives: News

Food giveaway today in West Sac

From the West Sacramento NEWS-LEDGER —

The Yolo County Food Bank will distribute food to eligible West Sacramento and Clarksburg residents on Tuesday, Aug. 21.

  Locations include the County building at 500 Jefferson Blvd. from 9-10 a.m.; Trinity Presbyterian Church at 1500 Park Blvd., from 10:30-11:15 a.m.; Yolo Housing Authority at 685 Lighthouse Drive from 11-noon; and the Clarksburg Firehouse from noon to 1 p.m.

Please bring a bag, and attend only one site. For information, call (530) 668-0690.

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Letters to the Editor, News-Ledger:

From the WEST SACRAMENTO NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 15, 2012 —

‘Well done, Char

It is my understanding that Char Ghio has retired as the Athletic Director at River City High School.

I would like to take this opportunity on behalf of the Sierra Valley Conference and me personally to say “thank you” to Char for all she has done for River City and the SVC.

CHAR GHIO, former Athletic Director at River City High School (News-Ledger file photo)

The job of athletic director is a thankless, time consuming (nights, weekends, summer) undertaking.  When athletic events take place, no one thinks of all of the hours of work that have gone into making that happen, unless something goes wrong.  If something does go wrong the AD is immediately on the hook for whatever issues occur.

The joy ADs do get is seeing kids getting to have the high school sports experience. It  makes most of the negatives seem worth it.

Char has been an invaluable member of the conference and I have had several conversations with her late at night, early in the morning, and on weekends concerning different issues of the league, scheduling, discipline, budgets, transportation, etc.  She truly was a committed AD who always wanted the best for her sports programs and student athletes.

River City High School has come a long way in the last couple of years.  They are very competitive in several sports now, and that is not by accident.  It has taken hours of hard work by players, coaches, administrators, and most of all, by a very committed athletic director.

River City High School and community has been very fortunate to have someone of Char’s character and organization to lead them over the years.

You will be missed Char!

DAVE JOHNSON
Sierra Valley Conference Commissioner

 

Reform animal shelter
Did you know the lost, stray and the abandoned animals picked up in West Sacramento go to the Yolo County animal shelter in Woodland? Did you know that West Sacramento is responsible for the highest number of animals being “housed” at the shelter?  Did you know that this shelter has a long record of poor performance (only a 45 percent “live release” rate) and fiscal inefficiency (higher cost per capita than the city of Sacramento)?

In response to these alarming statistics, a group of Yolo county concerned citizens are seeking a new animal shelter model and a commitment from city and county officials for a live release rate of at least 90 percent. There are models out there and it can be done!

How can we, in West Sacramento, make this happen? We have an unprecedented window of opportunity to bring real reform to Animal Services in Yolo County. Yolo County has commissioned animal welfare consultants to examine the Animal Shelter situation.   Their report is nearing completion and will be open for public comment shortly.

  Please do a search for Yolo Coalition for Animal Shelter Reform in Facebook or  go to http://www.facebook.com/groups/342644755816399/.. This Facebook page is composed of concerned groups and individuals who would like to see many more animals adopted and less animals killed at the animal shelter.

The main function of the page is to inform, mobilize and create change, and will serve as a bulletin board for upcoming council meetings, reports and updates on what is occurring and what needs to be done!   We can do this; we need your voice to take this effort to the next level!

Now is a critical time because the County is finally seriously looking at this issue—the shelter was identified as one of the top three priorities for improvement. What needs to happen now? Community members across Yolo County must create pressure on our political leaders to create change that results in more animal adoptions and more live releases. Other communities have done this and so can we!

AMY McGUIRE, committee member of Yolo County Pet Animal Welfare Society (YC PAWS)
West Sacramento

  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

The wilderness nearby: Cache Creek

Dean Fulks wades into a pool under the Trout Creek waterfall in the Cache Creek Wilderness (courtesy photo)

By Andrew Fulks

It’s summer, 2012.

The slap, slap, slap of Cache Creek drums on the bottom of my boat as I paddle down the North Fork.  Bobbing, weaving, head down.  Branches have grown since last summer.  The North Fork is the first couple miles of the Wilderness run and the vegetation makes for more difficult obstacles than further down on the main stem of the creek.  Flows are high this year, despite the drought.  It’s an artifact of human water management.

With less water in Clear Lake this year after a meager Winter, Indian Valley reservoir is releasing more to make up the difference for the thirsty farms in Yolo County.  I have to thank the farms for this experience.  If people hadn’t changed the water regime, this creek would be mostly dry in the summer.  Makes me reflect on what it means for things to be truly ‘wild’.  But, that thought is cut short by my scanning an Arundo on the shoreline.

A quick turn, paddle in deep, pulling off on the left bank.  Arundo: also known as Giant Reed, False Bamboo, cutter of hands and eroder of streambanks.  Another human artifact.  Planted as an ornamental and for erosion control, escaped to the ‘wild’, and invades ecosystems.  Our hubris about ‘fixing’ nature has broken it.  Ironically, I’m here doing the same thing.  Tuleyome’s been battling this weed within the Cache Creek wilderness for the last 7 years, and have the infestation down to less than a handful of plants.  This one escaped my detection until now.  A quick herbicide spray, and we’re back on the river.  Where there used to be almost 100 of these giant weeds here in the wilderness, we’ve reduced to a handful.  Soon there will be none.  The system is broken, though, and hidden upstream sources will continue to fertilize our shores with little plants.  We’re in this for the long haul.

The native willows and cottonwoods sway in the slight breeze.  Rushes and sedges line the banks, forming a ribbon of green contrasting the bright yellow of my kayak.  There’s a rumble up ahead, warning of a rapid.  I’ve run this so many times in the last dozen years, my reaction is automatic.  Back paddle, pick my line, hit it straight, dig hard, and avoid the tree branch.  A Great Blue Heron unfolds his wings and heads downstream.  He’ll be our travelling companion for the rest of the trip, always staying ahead of the interlopers.  Turtles on streamside rocks give us a sideways glance.  Some are stacked on each other.  King of the mountain gets the sunlight.  Some slip into the water as we get closer.  They’ll emerge downstream on the next rock that is to their liking.

We pull off at Trout Creek.  Even though it’s summer, there’s a steady flow coming out of the side canyon.  We know the spring-fed creek will be flowing late into the summer.

We also know what’s up the canyon.  Scrambling up the rocks and ducking under the willows, we pick our way toward the sound of falling water.  I’ve been here before, and many times.  A large stream of water shoots off a rock ledge, falling vertically into a perfectly round pool.  Behind the pool is a grotto.  Water droplets drip from rocks onto ferns.  This oasis is largely unknown, save for a few boaters that follow the bear path up the canyon.  No roads, no trails.  Wild.

  Back on the water, the breeze picks up.  We’re floating downstream, but getting pushed backwards.  Time for the arms to start working again.  The drumming of the water gets an accompaniment with the swoosh of paddle strokes.  The rhythm is broken by the crunch of branches.  Mother bear and her cub run up the hillside, their bronze fur rippling with each stride.  The exhilaration of seeing such a creature is replaced by the analytical mind.  Bear, check.  Turtles, River otter, Bald eagle, Osprey, Green heron, Blue heron, garter snake, deer…all, check.

Later, as we drag the boats up to the car, I reflect on the human infrastructure that was required to allow me to enjoy this wilderness.   Cars, gas, rubbers, plastics, and a sinuous serpentine asphalt ribbon.  It’s paradoxical, and uniquely human.  The artificial gets me closer to the natural.  It’s a paradox, but also a balance.  Preserving wild areas provides that balance.

  Andrew Fulks is the president of Tuleyome, a regional conservation nonprofit, and is presently the Putah Creek Riparian Reserve Manager for UC Davis, managing 6 miles of stream and several hundred acres. His interest is in open space preservation and public access.

  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

‘Corn Festival’? ‘Hemp Festival’? Your ideas for an annual West Sac celebration

FROM THE WEST SACRAMENTO NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 15, 2012 —

  EDITOR’S NOTE: The News-Ledger recently got to wondering whether West Sacramento ought to take another stab at coming up with its own annual festival to celebrate. So we posted the following question on our Facebook web page, and received the suggestions below:

“All right: so Woodland has a tomato festival (coming up on Aug 11). Isleton has a crawdad festival. Sacramento has a jazz festival. What should West Sac celebrate with a festival?”

  Billy Mistler: a Whitey’s Special festival.

  Gloria Pedroza-Madrid: Nice, Billy! But I will work with you, how about Whitey’s Peach milkshake festival!!!

  Sarah Wilson: Rice. Port of Sacramento.

  Cynthia ‘Cindi’ Islas: Corn festival.

  Denice Seals: How ‘bout a weekly Farmers Market! (Editor’s note: Denice heads up the local chamber of commerce, which happens to sponsor a Thursday-night farmers market!)

  Joshua Williams: Beer Cheese and Wine Festival!

  Katie Adams: beer festival!!

  Eve Westvik: A tamale festival.

Mary Brookins: Rice!

  Nathan Mccully: a drug and alcohol recovery festival and watermelon.

Dillon Stenholm: Hemp fest.

Pj Hargrove Bonfield: Something to highlight the Port.

  Debby Fricano: Corn festival!

  Julia McMichael: The Jazz Society is West Sacramento. Duh.

  David Prescott: West Sacramento Free Adult Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Festival.

  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

‘Mountain Lions’ move to Raley Field

FROM THE WEST SACRAMENTO NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 8, 2012 —

West Sacramento will get another “minor league” sports team:

  The Mountain Lions of the United Football League announced Friday they will begin playing their home games at Raley Field, current home of the River Cats baseball team.

The field will be reconfigured for American football when the Mountain Lions play in West Sacramento on Sept. 28, Oct. 10, Nov. 2 and Nov. 7.

The team previously played at Sacramento State.

In other news for Raley Field, the ballpark announced yesterday that it will host a soccer game from Mexico’s First Division League on Sept. 8.

Club Atletico Monarcas Morelia will face the San Luis FC in an 8 p.m. game, with tickets going on sale Thursday at Raley Field at at ticketmaster.com. It will be an exhibition match sanctioned by U.S. Soccer.

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Blood drive today at city hall

FROM THE WEST SACRAMENTO NEWS-LEDGER —

You’re invited to drop off a little of the red stuff during a City of West Sacramento blood drive on Wednesday, Aug. 15, at city hall.

A Sacramento BloodSource mobile coach will be in the parking lot at 1110 West Capitol Avenue from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. for appointments (call Kryss Rankin, 617-4500). Walk-ins taken when space is available.

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Boxing champ runs for council

OLEG MASKAEV (2007 by D. Warnbolt/Wikipedia for public domain)

FROM THE WEST SACRAMENTO NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 8, 2012 —

The first challenger has “pulled papers” to enter the West Sacramento Council race — and it’s a face that’s new to local politics, if not new to the public eye.

Oleg Maskaev, a former WBC heavyweight boxing champion who lives in Southport, West Sacramento, has taken the first step toward entering the race against that includes incumbents Oscar Villegas and Bill Kristoff.

Maskaev was born in the former Soviet Union and has lived in the U.S. since 1999, becoming a citizen in 2004, reports the online site Wikipedia.

Deadline for Maskaev or other candidates to file their paperwork for the race is this Friday, although that deadline will be extended if either of the incumbents fails to file.

His campaign manager, David Joyce, identified himself online as affiliated with the “Tea Party” faction of the Republican party.

No other challengers have picked up candidacy paperwork for either the mayor’s race (against incumbent Christopher Cabaldon) or the council race, reported the city clerk yesterday.

UPDATE AUG 13, 2012: The deadline closed Friday for candidates to file their paperwork to enter either the West Sacramento city council or mayoral campaign.

  Maskaev did complete his campaign candidate paperwork, reported the West Sacramento City Clerk. But no other challengers emerged to face city council incumbents Bill Kristoff or Oscar Villegas, or to face mayor Christopher Cabaldon.

  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012