Tag Archives: newspaper

City cracks down on ‘liveaboards’ anchored in Port; sewage a concern

Moored boats and barge in the turning basin at the Port of West Sacramento. This section of the port is just south of Industrial Boulevard and west of Harbor Boulevard. (These vessels may or may not be involved in current litigation.


By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

The City of West Sacramento is apparently cracking down on the “liveaboards,” some of whom have long lived on boats anchored or tied to shore in the Port of West Sacramento’s turning basin.

  Mike Luken, the port director, told the News-Ledger that the crackdown involves litigation with some of the boaters.

“The city is enforcing its long-term anchoring permit,” said Luken. “The city requires that vessels moored more than 90 days obtain a permit. . . and that they renew the permit on an ongoing basis. There are a number of people not complying with it.”

Affected are some recreational boats and barges at the port. Some of them have disposed of their boats, but some boats and barges remain.

“There were some people that removed their vessels voluntarily,” added Luken.

Has the city bought any of these boats to easy the liveaboards out?

“There have not been any cash settlements as of yet,” said Luken.

He referred the News-Ledger to the code enforcement department for more information on the crackdown, but a spokesperson there could not immediately be reached.

One of the concerns about the boaters is about sanitation – essentially, it’s the question of where their sewage goes, if not untreated directly into the port.

  “The permit requires that you utilize a licensed facility for sanitary disposal,” Luken said.

The nearest accessible sewage pumpout station is probably in Rio Vista, he said (a distance too far for a casual boating trip), but the boaters could also used a licensed hauler to remove their waste by truck.

  Support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper.  It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Honorees to include McGowan, Ross


The “2012 Community Awards” for to be presented at tonight’s West Sacramento “State of the City” address and dinner have been announced.

Slated to receive them are:

Yolo County Supervisor Mike McGowan of West Sacramento, who will receive the “Civic Leadership for Pride” award;

The “Farm Fresh to You” program, winning “Civic Leadership for Prosperity”;

City Manager Toby Ross will get the “Civic Leadership for Service” award; he has announced his retirement this year;

And the West Sacramento Farmers Market wins the “Civic Leadership for Community” award. The farmers market is the brainchild of the West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce.

Tonight’s event will be held at city hall and features the annual state of the city address given by the mayor.  Mayor Christopher Cabaldon has told the News-Ledger this year’s “State of the City” will honor the 25th year of city-hood, with members of the incorporation committee present. He will also talk about what’s going on now in West Sacramento’s growth and development.

The event is sponsored by the local chamber of commerce.

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Young gymnasts score high

Young gymnasts Wesley Wu, Ryan Henegar, Vinny Warren, Jakob Marrone, Savion Perea, with Coach Abraam Nersesyan


On March 11, the “level 4” boys team from International Gymnastics Centre in West Sacramento competed in the Northern California State Championship meet in San Luis Obispo. The team took third place and produced two all-around place state champions, Savion Perea and Wesley Wu.

  The following are the individual All-Around performances bracketed by their age group. Savion Perea (9+) and Wesley Wu (6) each took first place. Jakob Marrone (8) and Kristian Stupin (7) each took 3rd place. Vinny Warren (7) took 7th place, and Ryan Henegar (6) took 9th place.

The level 4 boys have trained nine hours a week under coaches Abraam Nersesyan and Jimmy Strosnider. (Courtesy of David Wu)

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

New life for your old sports shoes


During April, the City of West Sacramento and the City of Elk Grove are partnering on a project to accept used athletic shoes that will be recycled by Nike shoes.

Nike recycles sneakers into three products: Nike Grind Rubber (made from the shoe’s outsole); Nike Grind Foam (made from the shoe’s midsole); and Nike Grind Fiber (made from the shoe’s fabric upper). These materials can become athletic fields, running tracks, and the cushion beneath tennis courts and basketball courts, for example.

West Sacramento offers two drop off collection locations (remember, athletic shoes only–any brand of running shoes, cross trainers, etc.):

  • City Hall on the first floor, open Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., 1110 West Capitol Ave.; and
  • West Sacramento Recreation Center, Mondays-Fridays, 6 a.m.-9 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays, 8 a.m.-8 p.m., 2801 Jefferson Blvd.

Please: no shoes containing metal, no cleats, no dress shoes, no wet or damp shoes, no sandals or flip-flops.

  Support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper.  It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012



NEWS-LEDGER — APRIL  4, 2012 —

  Information for this ‘Police Log’ has come directly from original police reports and documents. The information includes citizen complaints and other statements that have not substantiated or proven by an investigation or a courtroom.  

  To see the ‘Police Log’ every week, see the special offer at bottom and subscribe to the News-Ledger!

March 28, 5 a.m.
A Fremont Boulevard man woke up inside his home to find the place had been burglarized as he slept. Gone were two sets of keys, his dogs, a jar of loose change and a Ford pickup truck with a camper shell. Neighbors reported hearing the dogs bark at about 3 a.m.

March 28, 10:45 a.m.
A Sacramento woman reported that people had broken into a vacant house on Hickory Street in West Sacramento, and that the interior “was vandalized with trash and fecal matter.”

March 28, 1:03 p.m.
A caller reported possible gang-related graffiti on Lighthouse Drive.

March 28, 6 p.m.
A market on the 1600-block of West Capitol said a 31-year old man had tried to pay for some items with two counterfeit bills. The man departed before police arrived, but the two bills were left behind. No losses.

March 28, 7:02 p.m.
A domestic dispute was reported in northern West Sacramento. A woman reported “her husband is locking their bedroom door and telling her if she goes in the room, he will call the police and she will go to jail.”

March 29, 12:25 p.m.
A West Sacramento car rental agency reported repossessing a car from a Sacramento woman, and then finding a loaded Smith & Wesson .44 caliber pistol in it. There was also a bullet hole in a window. The gun turned out to have been reported stolen from Grass Valley.

March 29, 2:20 p.m.
An officer contacted a 48-year old man illegally camping near South River Road and Jefferson Boulevard. The man was found in possession of marijuana and had an open container of alcohol. He was arrested.

March 29, 8:26 a.m.
An officer pulled over a 25-year old male transient for a vehicle code violation near West Capitol and Merkley. The man had several outstanding warrants, for which he was arrested. During an inventory search of the vehicle, the officer found two small bags containing a “crystal like substance” in the center console. The officer believed it to be crystal methamphetamine. Also found in the console was a “smoking pipe made from a piece of rubber and a plastic straw. The man was jailed. The substance tested positive as crystal meth, and weighed about 0.8 grams.

March 29, 11 a.m.
Someone found a drug smoking pipe in the parking lot of the West Sacramento Recreation Center in Southport, and turned it in to staff.

March 29, 3:56 p.m.
A caller reported he had just been robbed. Through the Craigslist Internet classified ad site, he made a deal to sell an iPad tablet computer. He met the two buyers in the parking lot of a store on Ikea Court. They gave him his money in counterfeit bills and grabbed the iPad. He tried to stop them as they drove off in a black, two-door convertible BMW, and was briefly dragged by the vehicle before he let go. He wasn’t hurt.

March 29, 3:58 p.m.
Someone reported that two men threw a gun into a home’s backyard near Ikea Court – from a black BMW sedan.

March 29, 1:17 p.m.
A $700 bicycle was stolen from an open garage on Fountain Drive.

March 29, 5:08 p.m.
A man called dispatchers, saying his 19-year old girlfriend was held by her parents in a Southport house “against her will all the time,” and that the parents “follow her to work and sit in front of her work all day,…monitor all visitors and calls and won’t let (him) talk to her.”

March 30, 12:49 a.m.
A resident reported there was somebody in a “hoodie” in the resident’s backyard near a shed on Michigan Blvd.

March 30, 4:57 a.m.
A citizen reported a man with a pickup truck, going through residential recycling bins along Merced Way towards Rubicon.

March 30, 6:54 a.m.
An employee at an Ikea Court store said there was a guy outside looking at vehicles and possibly doing drugs. The employee watched this through a security camera, saying there was no security on staff and the employee was afraid to go outside.

March 30, 5:41 p.m.
A Maryland Avenue resident asked for extra police patrols. During the previous night, someone had taken a bench from the yard and “moved it to the middle of the street.”

March 30, 8:16 a.m.
An Allan Avenue resident said someone had stolen cans and cardboard from the backyard. The resident said there were some black bags in a neighbor’s front yard that could be some of the stolen trash.

March 30, 8:29 a.m.
A driver reported having accidentally damaged a city sign behind a Town Center Plaza store.

March 30
An officer took a report that someone had broken into a fire vehicle on Evergreen Avenue, taking a chainsaw, bolt cutters, keys and medical supplies.

March 30, 5 a.m.
A car – possibly left unlocked – was found burglarized on Park Boulevard. The owner reported that a car stereo was taken.

March 30, 9 a.m.
A man reported a car burglary on Stillwater Road. Gone was a prototype solar panel controller valued at $1,000.

March 30, 4:58 p.m.
Witnesses reported that a car hit a bicyclist or pedestrian at the corner of West Capitol and Jefferson. One said the injured person was in the street “not moving.”

March 30, 8:46 a.m.
A 1989 Chevrolet Blazer was burglarized during the night. Gone were stereo amps and a woofer.

March 30, 8:56 a.m.
A Fountain Drive witness said there was a man standing by the gate, yelling at passersby and causing a disturbance. The man then went to a tent on the levee.

March 31, 9:29 a.m.
A caller reported someone had scratched or keyed a car on the 2100-block of West Capitol.

March 31, 11:13 a.m.
A 2001 Corvette was reported stolen from a driveway on Alder Way, sometime since December.

March 31, 11:39 a.m.
Near Jefferson and Gateway, a Toyota Sienna was rear-ended by a Ford F-250 pickup.

March 31, 6:37 a.m.
A mobilehome on Glide Avenue was reported to have been burglarized within the last 90 minutes. Gone were a TV, money, jewelry, an iPod, a Blu-Ray player and other items.

April 1, 12:09 a.m.
A mobile home resident on the 2000-block of West Capitol said (s)he could hear neighbors’ voices outside and “they sound like they are laughing at (the caller) and flashing lights into the home. This kind of thing was an ongoing problem.

April 1, 3:51 a.m.
An outside law enforcement agency notified W.S.P.D. it would be near some Maple Street apartments in an unmarked van.

April 1, 5:06 a.m.
A Madrone Avenue resident said a male neighbor had recently been released from jail. There was a party at the neighbor’s house, and it was now turning into a fight.

April 1, 7:31 p.m.
A citizen reported a ripoff. He had just bought an iPad from two subjects for $200. But “the iPad was just a piece of cardboard and Styrofoam,” and the sellers left in a Jeep Cherokee southbound on Jefferson while the buyer was opening the iPad box.

April 1, 8:08 p.m.
A motorcyclist was reported “down” at Gregory Avenue and South River Road.

April 1, 9:19 p.m.
A caller said that about 45 minutes earlier, the caller’s daughter had been walking with a male friend and a dog near Glide Avenue and Franklyn. A known female driver then tried to hit the dog and friend, then got out of her car and tried to assault the male. She was on meth.

April 1, 10:14 p.m.
A domestic violence incident was reported in the northern part of the city.

April 1, 10:44 p.m.
A man said his ex-wife had come to his north-area residence, kicked the door, and attacked and scratched him. She left when he called police. He didn’t need medical aid.

April 1, 10:48 p.m.
A staff member at a motel on the 4700-block of West Capitol said a female tenant in a pink jogging suit was “banging on the glass and threatening” the employee, refusing to leave the office.

  Support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper.  It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

It’s only kindness that matters

NEWS-LEDGER — MARCH 28, 2012 —


A few nights ago I was watching one of those cable network news shows and the panel was discussing some of the televised political ads that are currently being aired in many of the states which are holding 2012 presidential primaries. The talking heads on the panel weren’t all that interesting, but the actual verbiage and images being used in the ads were. In fact, it was actually pretty disturbing to watch politicians who desperately want to be the President of the United States call each other every name imaginable, and do so in ways that stretch the truth so badly that it is actually nothing less than lying.


After the show was over, I found myself reflecting on why our current political discourse has gotten so nasty and unkind. But since our politicians only reflect the voters they long to impress, the answer must be with us as individuals, and not just with those we choose to lead us. And the more I tried to get my head around such a sad reality, the more I found myself thinking back to Jack Vincent, an elderly little man who used to live right across the street from the house I grew up in on Michigan Boulevard here in West Sacramento.

Jack was a man of great energy for someone his age, or at least it seemed like it because when he walked, he always did so at what was warp speed for him. And the one thing which really set his walk apart was that he was very bow-legged, and the combination of that and the speed he tried to get up to when he was on foot made him very noticeable when he was shuffling from place to place. But as interesting as Jack’s way of walking was, the thing which really made him unique – and so memorable to me – was how he always went about interacting with his fellow man. I doubt that Jack’s special way of talking to other people was a conscious or calculated thing on his part, but rather just an extension of who he was as a person, and it went something like this:

  Whenever Jack would see someone, be they a few feet away from him or way across the street, he would find a way (with a big smile on his face) to pass along a compliment, or just say something nice that, thinking back on it after it had happened to you, would make your day. And it didn’t matter if you were young or old, short or tall, skinny or fat, black or white, rich or poor, in fancy clothes or in hand-me-downs, because Jack could always somehow come up with a compliment that seemed to be genuine, more or less accurate, and right from his heart. He seemed determined to always be nice and thoughtful and kind to everyone who crossed his path.

In my particular case (remembering that I was in my early teens at the time), Jack would say such things as, “Now Daryl, that’s a great haircut you just got! It makes you look really handsome! Boy, are the girls going to be after you now!” Or, “I wish I could throw a ball up against my garage door the way you do yours! What an arm! I bet someday the New York Yankees are going to be after you!” Or, “I think it’s great that you always help your dad with the yardwork! Hard-working young boys like you make me feel good about the future of this great country of ours!”

So when Jack was done with me I usually felt like I could take on the world and that it was only a matter of time before I would be driving the girls crazy and playing shortstop for the New York Yankees! And as time went by, I began to notice that Jack’s ability to always be thoughtful and never mean-spirited had the very same effect on others as it did on me. And many was the time I would overhear Jack making someone else’s day, and then see them stroll away from him smiling and with a little more spring in their step, all because a little old man who walked funny chose to take a minute or two out of his day to say something kind and nice to a fellow human being.

So, at a relatively early age I learned that if we really want to, we can actually choose to make those around us feel good about themselves, or we can just as easily choose to do the opposite. We can consciously decide to bring out the very best in others, or we can constantly harp on all their week points. We can send people on their way to face another tough day with a smile on their face, or we can weigh them down with ugly words and make them feel heavy.

  One of my favorite sayings (although I no longer remember who wrote it and have probably rearranged the words a bit over the years) is: “If there is any kindness I can do, let me do it now, for I shall not pass this way again.” For whatever reason, Jack Vincent had decided to live his life that way, and maybe if more of us dedicated ourselves to the same goal, we could actually have ourselves a relatively civil society again, and our politicians and their political consultants wouldn’t dare fill our airways with all those hateful words, half-truths and lies.

  Support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper.  It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Chamber party: beer, sauerkraut, music


The West Sacramento Chamber of Commerce invites you to celebrate spring with a “Bavarian May Fest” from 5-9 p.m. on Friday, May 11, at the farmers market site, 1271 West Capitol Avenue. Beer, brats, sauerkraut, live music, dancing and contests. $25 in advance or $30 at the door.

Call Meaghan at the chamber, 371-7042, or visit www.WestSacramentoChamber.com.

Copyright News-Ledger 2012