Tag Archives: sacramento

‘Burger Battle’ cookoff at Raley Field

[adrotate group=”9″] FROM THE WEST SACRAMENTO NEWS-LEDGER —

Raley Field will host the “Sacramento Burger Battle,” pitting local chefs against each other to find the region’s best burger and support the Chron’s and Colitis Foundation of America.

“The Eatery” of West Sacramento’s Southport area is on the list of competing restaurants.

The event is scheduled for Sept. 18.

Visit http://sacburgerbattle.com.

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Old Sac returns to old times:

[adrotate group=”10″] WEST SACRAMENTO NEWS-LEDGER ONLINE — AUG 30, 2012 —

Organizers will heap more than 200 tons of decomposed granite onto the streets of Old Sacramento this weekend for the annual “Gold Rush days” celebration. The event celebrates life in the 1850s.

There will be dancers, street dramas, wagon rides, gold panning, storytelling, craft making, a tent city, musicians, horse-drawn carriages and more

Admission is free. Hours are Friday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 10-7, and Monday 10-5.

For more information and event schedule, call (916) 808-7777 or visit http://www.sacramentogoldrushdays.com/

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

West Nile: no aerial spraying planned yet

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 25, 2012 —

  The folks who fight West Nile Virus every summer by attacking the mosquito population report that no aerial spraying is planned at this time in the Sacramento-Yolo area — but low intensity ground spraying is underway from time to time.

  The Sacramento-Yolo Mosquito & Vector Control District reports that in Sacramento County thus far this season, 161 dead birds and 124 mosquito samples have tested positive for the virus. In Yolo, eight dead birds and four mosquito samples have tested positive.

  No “sentinel” chickens have turned up with the disease.

[adrotate group=”9″] In addition to spraying to kill mosquitos, the “Fight the Bite” effort urges homeowners to take other anti-mosquito precautions — like emptying any standing water around their yards where mosquitos might breed, and reporting any neglected or abandoned swimming pools in their neighborhood.

   For more information on spraying plans and methods to ward off the virus, visit www.FightTheBite.net.

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Port hopes feds will fund new barges, allowing it to start container-barging service

The $5 million crane unloaded about six months ago at the Port of West Sacramento hasn’t been used for its primary intended purpose yet. But Port Manager Mike Luken is optimistic. (Photo courtesy of Amy Cameron, Port of West Sacramento)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER, JULY 25, 2012 —

By Steve Marschke

News-Ledger Editor

  The $5 million crane received by the Port of West Sacramento in January primarily to handle shipping container traffic hasn’t actually lifted any shipping containers yet. But port manager Mike Luken said he is confident that his facility will still get a chance to start shipping things in big metal container boxes, and the crane will get a chance to help move them around.

  The money for the crane was part of $8.7 million the port received in federal stimulus money through the “Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery” (TIGER) grand program, applied for in conjunction with the ports of Oakland and Stockton.

  “The mobile harbor crane was about $5 million,” said Luken. “A container facility building was about $2 million. We had a dock strengthening project for about one million. The remaining funding we contributed to two barges to start the project at Stockton.”

  The ports hope to begin a barge corridor program to handle cargo between Oakland and the Central Valley, to generate revenue for the ports and reduce truck traffic on regional freeways. To do that, “we’re aiming to match the cost of moving cargo by truck,” said Luken.

  The Port of West Sacramento does not yet have any container-handling barges.

  “We have been applying for a different TIGER grant to get two barges,” Luken said.

[adrotate group=”7″]  In the meantime, the imported crane will get some use, he said.

  “Yes, it was purchased with the intent to help this particular service, but it was also intended to be used for other cargoes. We haven’t used the crane yet, we just got it, just got it assembled.”

   The port’s financial picture is currently depressed, partly because of the reduced demand to ship cement — a recently-added Port of West Sacramento mainstay. He estimated that the port is averaging about a half-million to a million dollars a year in losses, and is dipping into reserves through the economic downturn.

  “We’re still climbing out of the recession, still using reserves,” said Luken. “We’re starting a couple of new cargoes, including iron fines. We’re hopefully starting that in two to four weeks.”

  Iron fines, a waste product from steel production, will be exported to be reprocessed into steel, said Luken.

  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Cabaldon: no threat from MLB team

NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 11, 2012 —

By Steve Marschke, News-Ledger Editor

With talks between the City of Sacramento and the Kings owners at a standstill, Sacramento Mayor  Kevin Johnson has let it be known that he wants Sacramento to get a new major league baseball team. Sacramento is a “major league city,” he said, and a stadium in the right spot could help jumpstart the city’s downtown railyards project.

  A major league team across would presumably “trump” the minor league River Cats baseball team and their relatively new stadium in West Sacramento.

  But West Sacramento’s mayor isn’t worried.

MAYOR CHRISTOPHER CABALDON (News-Ledger/2012)

  “It doesn’t mean anything,” Mayor Christopher Cabaldon told the News-Ledger. “The Oakland A’s aren’t interested, Major League Baseball and minor league baseball aren’t interested. . . There’s no impact (on West Sacramento and the River Cats) because it’s not going to happen.”

   The A’s want to go to San Jose — which is within the territory designated as under control by the San Francisco Giants, but which offers a larger market and more potential corporate sponsors than  Sacramento. The Giants are fighting the proposed A’s move. Meanwhile, Sacramento is in the A’s territory and the River Cats are affiliated with the A’s. The River Cats have some legal obligations to stick around until the bonds that helped build Raley Field are paid off — roughly another 20 years.

  The teams’ wishes are balanced by their obligations to their leagues and by the power of their leagues, making “an extremely complicated set of procedures for how these things happen,” said Cabaldon.

  And right now, neither Major League Baseball nor any of its teams is pushing to take a chance on the Sacramento market.

  So, Cabaldon said, West Sacramento’s government is not spending a lot of time studying Johnson’s baseball dream.

  The River Cats declined an interview request, but issued the following statement, with a reference to Mayor Johnson’s “Think  Big Sacramento” task force:

“We have not discussed the proposal with ‘Think Big’ or City of Sacramento officials. We are obviously proud of the community support of Raley Field and the success of the River Cats. We are focused on providing the best experience to our fans in and around the ballpark and have been excited to see (West Sacramento’s) Bridge District prepared for future development.”

[adrotate group=”7″]  Raley Field opened in 2000 in a former warehouse district in West Sacramento amid regional cooperation, after a bout of competition for the stadium site between West Sacramento and Sacramento. A regional coalition helped put together a bond package that helped finance it.

  River Cats spokesperson Zak Basch said the River Cats have drawn an average of 7,659 fans this year, and Cabaldon said the team was among the most successful in the minor leagues.

  When the stadium was designed, its 11,000-seat capacity was intended to be expandable to host a possible future major league team. The league’s requirements for a stadium have since changed — stadiums and teams rely more heavily than ever on items like luxury boxes —  and Basch said the expansion issue has not been studied lately.

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  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

RCHS kid nails the blues

Ammon Burdge with Alison Flory, art education coordinator for YoloArts

NEWS-LEDGER — JULY 4, 2012 —

  Ammon Burdge of River City High School won this year’s ‘Blues in the Schools’ contest, composing a song called “Sky’s Turning Gray  Skies Blue.” The senior is a member of the school’s jazz band, “The Syncopating Sea-Monkeys.”

  The winning song will be produced and recorded by professional musicians.

[adrotate group=”9″]   Students from Woodland and West Sacramento competed in the songwriting contest, co-sponsored by YoloArts and the Sacramento Blues Society.

  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Sac’s Rubicon Brewery to expand production with West Sac plant

Glynn Phillips, majority owner of Rubicon Brewing Company (right), enjoys a pint at his current Sacramento facility. (Photo courtesy of Lee Marketing/Rubicon Brewery)

NEWS-LEDGER — JUNE 6, 2012 —

West Sacto facility will help Rubicon produce more ‘Monkey Knife Fight Pale Ale’ & other popular brews

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

Sacramento’s Rubicon Brewing Company plans to expand its beer production by opening a West Sacramento plant late this year..

And the new brewery might – maybe, perhaps – open a tasting room, reports Glynn Phillips, majority owner of Rubicon. The new brewery will occupy about 16,000 square feet at 885 Stillwater Road in West Sacramento, near IKEA.

[adrotate group=”9″]   “Our focus and most important market is the Sacramento area,” Phillips told the News-Ledger. “We feel like we’re unable to supply the Sacramento area with enough beer to truly do it justice. We want to make sure Rubicon truly takes its spot as Sacramento’s oldest and most-produced local beer.”

At the company’s sole brewery and pub near 20th and Capitol, “there are people every day making beer, and we’re making it for Sacramento first.”

Rubicon’s products can be found on tap and in bottles at a number of regional restaurants and stores – including Raley’s, Bel Air, Whole Food, Taylor’s Market and Beverages & More, Phillips said.

“When you say ‘Rubicon,’ you’re talking about a brewery that has 25 years of history in the region. We’re the oldest continuously operating brewery in the Sacramento area, and probably one of the top five or ten oldest breweries on the West Coast.”

Others in that club, said Phillips, are names like Sierra Nevada, Anchor, Triple Rock and Mendocino Brewing Company.

What’s Rubicon’s flagship beer?

“Our IPA (India Pale Ale) has been our flagship ale since the late ‘80s,” said Phillips. “Most recently, our pale ale – called ‘Monkey Knife Fight’ – has taken over the area by storm.”

Rubicon products, lined up at the company’s bar at 20th and Capitol in Sacramento. (Photo courtesy of LEE MARKETING/Rubicon Brewing Co.)

The brewpub in midtown Sacramento is now maxing out at about 2,400-2,500 barrels of beer per year, said Phillips (one “barrel” is 31 gallons). But the company feels it isn’t meeting demand from local stores and restaurants, let alone markets outside the region. Rubicon has sometimes used Sudwerk in Davis to “contract brew” some of its recipes to help meet local demand (“They help ease the pain,” said Phillips.).

The new plant will approximately triple Rubicon’s capacity:

“We’re aiming for 4-5,000 barrels (from West Sacramento) in 2013,” said Phillips.

Phillips, 47, got into beer as a restaurant manager for Great Basin Brewing Company in Sparks.
“That’s where I really found my love for craft beer,” he said.

He later worked as general manager at Marin Brewing Company, and has been owner of Rubicon for seven years. He reports that the craft brewing companies in the region are supportive of each other.

[adrotate group=”7″]   “We feel like we’re all in this together,” said Phillips. “Our friends at the Auburn Alehouse, Sudwerk, River City Brewing, and American River Brewhouse – we all talk together. There’s a competitive streak, but we do ask ‘what grain is working for you right now?’ or we say, ‘hey, I tried your beer over at this place, and what I noticed was this –.’”

Rubicon’s Sacramento brewpub has a bar, indoor seating and a patio area, and a full menu.

The West Sac facility will, at least initially, focus just on stuff like mashing and fermenting. But there might be a time when it opens up for public tasting and for sales of six-packs and such.

Having a tasting room “really depends on the City of West Sacramento,” said Phillips. “It would be just a tasting room. There are some really nice laws that exempt me from some regulations if it’s just a tasting room. But it’s such a mountain-climb just to open a new brewery, we’ll just climb that mountain first.”

One local city councilman has lobbied him to create a West Sac brewpub – but that’s not on the horizon right now, said Phillips.

He said that he was “always” pretty set on expanding into West Sacramento, but that his company spent several years checking on water quality before taking the plunge.

“We got water samples over the last three years,” he said.

Rubicon’s brewmaster of 22 years, Scott Cramlet, told the News-Ledger that Rubicon presently uses Sacramento’s city water, adding a few minerals for some beer styles. West Sacramento’s water – also drawn from the Sacramento River– is pretty similar, said Cramlet.

The West Sac water samples passed muster, added Phillips.

The new plant is slated to start mixing grain, hops, water and yeast beginning in November, with a staff of about 40.

“We hope to open and hire shortly thereafter,” said Phillips. “We have focused on this for a very long time.”

  Yes, you can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper.  It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2012