Tag Archives: school

Kindergarten registration in West Sac

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

The local school district is accepting registration for kindergarten and for “transitional kindergarten” (TK) through August 1.

For kindergarten, a child’s first birthday must occur by September 1, 2014. For TK, the birthday must be between September 2 and December 2. Bring a birth certificate, up-to-date immunization records, copy of utility bill or other address verification, proof of physical (dated since August, 2013), dental exam record, Social Security card (optional). Pick up a registration packet at the Washington Unified School District, 930 Westacre Road.

Call 375-7600 for information.

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West Sac school board ponders a bond

NEWS-LEDGER ONLINE — JUNE 26, 2014 —

West Sacramento’s school district tonight will discuss putting a $49.8 million bond on the November 4 ballot, where it would need 55 percent of the vote to succeed.

The money would be used to help fund a lengthy list of repairs and upgrades to facilities in the Washington Unified School District, including fire systems, wheelchair access ramps, heating and ventilation units, windows, paving and security systems. The projects are in the district’s “Capitol Improvement Program.”

Property owners would repay the bonds, with assessments not to exceed $60 per $100,000 of assessed value annually, says the proposed bond resolution. Thus, a homeowner whose house is valued at $300,000 on the tax roll would pay up to $180 per year for bond repayment.

The district sponsored a survey in February which they believe shows a bond measure in November could be successful, provided a campaign educates the public about “the need for facility funding that exceeded both the District and the State’s capacity,” according to a district staff report.

The proposed bond will be part of the school board meeting that begins tonight (Thursday, June 26) at 6 p.m. at city hall, 1110 West Capitol Avenue.

More in next week’s News-Ledger newspaper.

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Spaghetti dinner to help family of Westmore Oaks school teacher

AMY MILLS has taught English and led drama productions in Washington Unified School District. She died Mother’s Day in hospice care, and friends are raising money to help her husband and two children with medical expenses from cancer treatment.   (Courtesy photo)

AMY MILLS has taught English and led drama productions in Washington Unified School District. She died Mother’s Day in hospice care, and friends are raising money to help her husband and two children with medical expenses from cancer treatment.
(Courtesy photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — MAY 14, 2014 —

Help the family of Westmore Oaks Elementary School teacher Amy Mills by showing up for some spaghetti, a silent auction and raffle on May 31.

Mills, 33, lost her fight with cancer on Sunday — Mother’s Day. She leaves behind a husband as well as children age eight and two.

According to Westmore Oaks secretary Holly Erickson, Mills was a teacher in West Sacramento’s school district since 2010. She taught English and ran the drama club, helping to put on productions of “Annie” and “Horton Hears a Who” on the Yolo High School gymnasium stage.

Her family has incurred large expenses from her medical treatment, which has included flights back and forth between West Sacramento and “Cancer Treatment Centers of America.”

Supporters are offering the spaghetti fundraiser beginning at 5 p.m. on Saturday, May 31, at the Moose Lodge, 3240 Jefferson Blvd. in Southport.

$10 in advance or $12 at the door; $5 for kids; children under three are no charge. Please bring a dessert to share.

To buy tickets, contact Erickson at spiritjunkie22@yahoo.com or (916) 842-8932.

Erickson said that donations to the family can also be made by check to Mills’s mother, Teresa Redwine, care of Holly Erickson, 1704 Lakewood Dr., West Sacramento CA 95691.

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

 

Trotting off the written page

Students from Southport and Westmore Oaks elementary schools get a close look at a pair of Belgian draft horses, “Tip” and “Champ” who weigh in at close to a ton apiece. Originally from  an Amish farm, they are carriage horses in Old Sacramento. Click to enlarge.  (News-Ledger photo)

Students from Southport and Westmore Oaks elementary schools get a close look at a pair of Belgian draft horses, “Tip” and “Champ” who weigh in at close to a ton apiece. Originally from an Amish farm, they are carriage horses in Old Sacramento. Click to enlarge. (News-Ledger photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — APRIL 30, 2014 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

They called it “Horsin’ Around for Literacy.”

The regional district of Rotary International asked its local chapters, like the Centennial Rotary Club in West Sacramento, to do something to improve literacy among children. So the local chapter several months ago launched a two-pronged, equestrian attack.

Explained Don Schatzel of Rotary:

“Thanks to support from the Southport PTO (parent-teacher organization) and the West Sacramento Trail Riders Association, we bought a book for every second grader at Southport and Westmore Oaks – books with horses in them. Now, in the spring, they get horses. We’re trying to teach it, see it, read it.”

The Southport students came to Westmore Oaks (the “old” River City High campus on Clarendon Street) for a special assembly Thursday morning. On the school’s football track were a bunch of horse trailers, horses and riders.

Charyl Silva and Don Schatzel, riders and Rotarians. Click to enlarge.  News-Ledger photo

Charyl Silva and Don Schatzel, riders and Rotarians. Click to enlarge.
News-Ledger photo

Wrestling with a struggling microphone system on a windy day, emcee Roberta Firoved introduced each horse and rider to the attentive students. She also explained some things about horses, including why their eyes are on the sides of their heads (as a prey animal, horses need to keep watch for predators) and how to measure a horse’s height (by using “hands”). Among the horse teams were:

— Ron Morazzini (trail riders’ president) with his quarterhorse “Jiggers.”
Jiggers “loves to follow Ron around the pasture like a puppy,” said Firoved.

— Rod Beckwith with a mule names “Socks.” A mule is a cross produced from a male donkey and female horse, explained Firoved.

— A pair of impressive Belgian draft horses, weighing in at 1,600 and 1,800 pounds, respectively.

— And a pony.

Jason Williams, an employee of the Bureau of Land Management, showed a little bit about how he helped round up wild horses with help from his dog “Hannah.” He rode “Stinger,” a horse born wild and bearing a BLM brand on its neck. He told the kids how he used his dog to help round up a wild horse.

Jason Williams with his horse “Stinger’ and his working dog ‘Hannah.  ‘ Williams works for the Bureau of Land Management and sometimes helps round up wild horses -- animals like Stinger.  (News-Ledger photo)

Jason Williams with his horse “Stinger’ and his working dog ‘Hannah. ‘ Williams works for the Bureau of Land Management and sometimes helps round up wild horses — animals like Stinger.
(News-Ledger photo)

“If I say ‘come by,’ she will go around the horse to the left,” said Williams. Another command sends Hannah to the right of the targeted animal. Hannah is prone to giving a horse a little nip on the heels as he scoots past, helping to herd the animal.

“A lot of times, that’s what I’ll do to gather horses,” said Williams.

After the talk, kids were invited to line up on one side of a fence while the horses came by in touching distance along the other:

“Read it, see it, touch it.”

 

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Two Southport Elementary students win honors for messages of peace

Sidney Logsdon & Rylee Carter.  Click to enlarge.  (courtesy of Angie Logsdon)

Sidney Logsdon & Rylee Carter.
Click to enlarge.
(courtesy of Angie Logsdon)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — APRIL 30, 2014 —

Two students from Southport Elementary School are among the winners in this year’s “Inspirational Message of Peace” contest sponsored by the National Park Service and International World Peace Rose Gardens.

The contest was in conjunction with the annual celebration of the “I Have a Dream” garden at the Martin Luther King, Jr., national historic site in Atlanta.

More than 1,900 students participated internationally, and 26 winners were selected. Two were from Southport Elementary.

They were first-grader Rylee Carter and seventh-grader Sydney Logsdon. The pair were judged to have excelled in meeting the criteria of the poem contest, including addressing a message involving peace or Martin Luther King, Jr., or Coretta Scott King, in 35 words or less.

The winners are invited to attend a ceremony on May 8 in Atlanta, and their winning poems will be engraved on a plaque for display at the historic garden for one year.

Rylee’s poem:
“I Love My World”
Martin Luther King was a great person.
He gave us peace and freedom.
We planted a rose for his wife.
Every time I walk by the rose garden, I smile.

Sidney’s message:
“He Had a Dream”
He had a dream that others tried to crush.
A plethora of battles yet to come.
But, still, he never gave up hope.
Little did he know,
What he did would change us forever.

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

 

Books wanted for high school library

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

The library at River City High School could use your help stocking the shelves with books – particularly biographies.

If you have an extra copy of a book about such persons as Barack or Michele Obama, current sports or popular culture icons, people from the tech world such as Steve Jobs or Bill Gates, or historical figures such as Malcom X, Caesar Chavez, Rosa Parks, etc., you can help. Call 375-7800, ext. 2321.

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

For CHiPs, the path starts here

  The CHP Academy’s memorial fountain, in a central part of the Reed Avenue campus . The fountain is ringed with brass plaques honoring each of the California Highway Patrol officers killed in the line of duty since the agency was founded. Some of the brass markers can be seen in the foreground              (News-Ledger photos/Steve Marschke)

The CHP Academy’s memorial fountain, in a central part of the Reed Avenue campus . The fountain is ringed with brass plaques honoring each of the California Highway Patrol officers killed in the line of duty since the agency was founded. Some of the brass markers can be seen in the foreground (News-Ledger photos/Steve Marschke)

NEWS-LEDGER — FEB 19, 2014 —

By Thomas Farley
News-Ledger Correspondent

“Safety, Service, Security”: that’s the motto of the California Highway Patrol.

The men and women officers who uphold that motto begin their careers right here in West Sacramento. Located on 457 acres off of Reed Avenue in the city’s northwest, the present CHP Academy began construction in 1974 and graduated its first class of recruits in 1976.

Capt. Chuck King CHP Academy Commander (News-Ledger photo)

Capt. Chuck King
CHP Academy Commander
(News-Ledger photo)

The Academy Commander, Captain Chuck King, recently invited the News-Ledger to tour the property. Judging by the number of cars in the parking lots, it was apparent upon arrival that the Academy is a major employer. Approximately two hundred part-time and full time employees work at the site, including sixty non-uniformed CHP employees. These people do everything from administrative tasks to cooking in the kitchens.

Next to the lobby in the headquarters is the recently completed CHP museum. It houses three motorcycles from years’ past as well as exhibits detailing the history of the Highway Patrol. Clearly evident are tradition, pride in service, and an esprit de corps among C.H.P. staff.

Step through the administration building, and you’ll find a central courtyard and the badge-shaped, five-pointed Memorial Fountain. The fountain pays tribute to the 225 California Highway Patrol Officers that have been killed in the line of duty since the organization was founded in 1929. (The most recent officers to give their lives were Officers Juan Gonzalez and Brian Law, partners and friends who graduated together in 2008 from the academy. The pair died Monday morning in a crash while responding to a call near Fresno.)

Every week, in a tradition that binds the generations of graduating classes to each other, cadets polish the brass name plaques that are affixed to the sides of the fountain.

CADETS -- mostly men with fresh short haircuts -- listen as instructors explain how to investigate a traffic accident   (News-Ledger photo)

CADETS — mostly men with fresh short haircuts — listen as instructors explain how to investigate a traffic accident (News-Ledger photo)

King led News-Ledger reporters toward the dormitories, which accommodate recruits during their 27-week training session. Nearby were classrooms, a gymnasium, and even a PX (a market). Facing the courtyard is a dining commons that can seat 400 people at a time. Some two hundred cadets in two training classes are presently at the school.

“We’re a completely self-contained facility,” King says. “The cadets live here for the duration of their training. And we are the only CHP Academy in the state. A lot of people are surprised at that. Since 1976, every officer you see working the road has gone through this academy.”

Inside the classroom was an amphitheater with rows of seats perched high above each other. Instructors in the well of the room supervised the class. Cadets looked on intently as two of their peers demonstrated how they would conduct a hypothetical accident investigation.

A rifle range, a pistol, range, a helipad, and a running track, are just some of the facilities beyond the main campus buildings. But the pride of the Academy is its Emergency Vehicle Operations Course, or EVOC. This is a set of specialized tracks that allow cadets to practice everything from wet-weather driving to high-speed maneuvers.

One of those driving courses is a “skid pad” – a large stretch of pavement outfitted with pop-up sprinklers, and graded to create puddles several inches deep. The sprinklers were activated for a driving demonstration. Patrol cars used for foul-weather driving practice are deliberately equipped with “bald” tires – all the better to practice hydroplaning and emergency steering techniques on wet roads.
Captain King explained that all of the water from the sprinklers is re-circulated and recycled.

Officer Julie Saraiva, an EVOC instructor, introduced herself to reporters and promptly threw a practice car around two laps and a dozen “S” turns. At each curve she accelerated and then put on the brakes, sliding the car into one turn and then another.

 CHP driving instructor Julie Saraiva demonstrates how to get a patrol car into a skid -- and, more importantly, how to get out. A reporter is in the passenger’s seat.  (News-Ledger photos/Steve Marschke)

CHP driving instructor Julie Saraiva demonstrates how to get a patrol car into a skid — and, more importantly, how to get out. A reporter is in the passenger’s seat.
(News-Ledger photos/Steve Marschke)

Then a visiting reporter took the wheel, at one point overcorrecting in a wet skid and spinning the car 180 degrees to face the wrong way. Instructor Saraiva nevertheless gave him good marks for a first session on the skid pad.

“Skid pad” driving is just part of their total EVOC training, one of 42 total “learning domains” that a cadet must master.

The CHP is selective. Captain King stated that over 20,000 people applied last year. The cadets now on-site represent just one percent of that number.

What quality does an applicant need most?

“The most important characteristic for a future officer is integrity, a good moral compass,” said King. “After they get to the Academy, the most important thing is dedication and staying focused on the training.”

To patrol California’s highways, C.H.P. officers must first take the road through West Sacramento.

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  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2014