Tag Archives: school

EDITORIAL: $50 may buy a young child some college dreams


What can we all do to help West Sacramento’s schools?

Well, one of the top strategic goals now being put forward by the local school board is to “foster a culture of high expectations.” And that is something that the City of West Sacramento, and the rest of us, can all help with.

For inspiration, consider this:

About 500 students graduate every year from the high school in Kalamazoo, Michigan. And each of them does so knowing that unknown donors have pledged to pay their full college tuition in the state’s public college and university system. The “Kalamazoo Promise” was announced in 2005, and it was intended not only to help local kids, but also to help the local economy.

  Students who enter the local school district part-way through their education get partial assistance, and those who are in it for the entire ride get the full “Promise.”  Knowing that their kids must stay in local public schools to qualify, families have an incentive to stay put in Kalamazoo. The city is meant to benefit from its ability to attract and retain families.

Announcement of the new program was greeted with celebration and also a degree of skepticism – how could somebody really be willing to pay for every local kid’s college education? But reality has set in, and the kids and their families are now starting to develop college expectations from a student’s early grades.

Local teachers and schools bought into the ambitious program, adding instructional hours and increasing college prep.

Too ambitious and expensive for your tastes? There are plenty of other college fund programs to look at.

Among them are those created by the City and County of San Francisco as well as the County of Cuyahoga, Ohio. These locales are going about the same thing, but on a much smaller scale.

Cuyahoga expects to spend $2 million a year putting $100 into a college fund for every new kindergartner. The funds can be redeemed by graduates towards college or vocational training.

The City and County of San Francisco are chipping in with the first $50 contribution to a college fund for every one of its new kindergartners. (For information, see http://www.k2csf.org/)

These smaller funds, even with compounding interest, may never pay for a big chunk of a student’s college education. But the accounts can be supplemented over the years with other donations from friends, family and a student’s own savings. And they’re not just about the money; they’re about the idea of going to college.

Just the existence of a college fund in a student’s name, even if it’s a modest one, can help  shape the expectations of a family and its kids. A family that may not have expected to send its child to college might begin to raise its sights.

West Sacramento is a city of challenging demographics, like Kalamazoo and San Francisco. Not every kid now going to school here believes that college or other higher education are realistic options. Funding a college account for each young child would be one way to chip away at that kind of defeatism.

A college fund program in West Sacramento need not rely on the cash-strapped Washington Unified School District for dollars. The program could be a partnership, using funds cobbled together from the city and from private donors to help. After all, encouraging kids to stay in local schools and then go to state colleges and universities (like the local Sac City College branch) would be good for West Sacramento’s economy.

It’s one way the whole city can help the local school district “foster a culture of higher expectations.”

  Please visit this article at our sister website here in order to comment. We may share your comment in the News-Ledger.

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Register for kindergarten Saturday


West Sacramento’s local elementary schools will accept registration for kindergarten and transitional kindergarten students on Sat., Feb. 23, from 9 a.m. to noon. Bring your child’s birth certificate, social security card, immunization records, proof of physical (dated after Aug., 2012, for kindergarten students) and a copy of your PG&E bill for address verification, to your local campus. For kindergarten, child’s fifth birthday must be on or before Oct. 1, 2013.

Questions? Contact Bridgeway Island Elementary at 375-7778; Elkhorn at 375-7670; Riverbank at 375-7700; Stonegate at 375-0960; Southport at 375-7890; Westfield at 375-7720; or Westmore Oaks at 375-7730.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Fundraising with firecrackers


If your church or nonprofit is interested in getting a permit to sell fireworks in West Sacramento during this year’s Independence Day (July 4) season, go to the information session scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 26, at 6 p.m. in the city council chambers, 1110 West Capitol Avenue.

The permit lottery will accept applications March 1-31. For more information, contact City Clerk Kryss Rankin at 617-4500.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Feb. 19 is last day to register


West Sacramento voters will choose a new school board member at a special election on March 5.

Last day to register to vote in time for the Washington Unified School District race is Feb. 19. You must be 18, a County of Yolo resident at least 15 days before the resident, a U.S. citizen, and you must complete a registration affidavit. For information, contact the Yolo County Elections Department, 625 Court St., Room B05, Woodland, CA 95695, or call (530) 666-8133 or 1-800-649-9943.

The News-Ledger traditionally invites each candidate to sit down for an interview to be published in the newspaper. Those interviews began publishing in the Jan. 23 News-Ledger and will continue until approximately Feb. 20. For information on subscribing to the News-Ledger, call (916) 371-8030.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Others’ views on school board issue


  On the News-Ledger’s “Facebook” internet page this week, we invited comments to last week’s newspaper editorial.

  The editorial (we’ve provided a link below) contrasted the way Washington Unified School District and Sacramento City Unified School District each handled the appointment of a new school board member to fill a vacancy, and suggested WUSD commit itself to more transparency.

  We received the following feedback on Facebook:

  Jenni Zimmerman Yarwood: The constant badgering and belittling of the WUSD board by both the News-Ledger and the mayor is very disheartening and troublesome.

How about being mature, responsible adults and not lowering yourself to elementary schoolyard bullying? How about coming together in a positive way with a workable solution without the constant mudslinging and backstabbing?

Sadly, this kind of behavior is very typical of the media and our government these days and it’s got to stop. We will never come together as a community, a state or a country if this kind of behavior continues. It is this kind of behavior that is literally tearing our country and our communities apart.


  Ardeene Brueske Westvik: Thank you for pointing out that the Sacramento School District managed to appoint a new temporary member without the cost of an additional election. I agree that transparency is always important in any public institution.

  However, I would suggest it is also important when the public is asked to elect a school board. It is shocking to hear about some of the money that is very likely going to be spent to elect members some political figures wish to be placed on the Board. One really wonders what their motives are. Do they actually have some magic answer to make major improvements in the district or is their motive something less apparent?

Having been a district teacher, administrator and school board member, I know there is not a financial reason, nor can school boards make many of the decisions that are now made by Federal and State categorical fund requirements. So if some group is willing to spent as much as $10,000 for a school board position, we need to know where that money comes from.

As our most-read local newspaper, I sincerely request that you make the public very aware of the source of all funding for all candidates running for a seat on the school board. Lets have transparency in all aspects of our public offices.


  Irene Perrigo Eklund: Even more important, why don’t you let the public know where the mayor and our supervisor got the money they spent on their independent expenditure committee and who is putting their name on them.

I read the article in the Bee about the Sacramento appointment and it was pretty much the same process as WUSD used. The mayor has already made the statement that if his candidate would have been appointed, this costly election would not be taking place.

So let’s just be honest about why this special election is taking place. It’s all about politics, power and greed. They surely do not care that the $130,000 price tag [for the special election] will come right from our kids’ classrooms. It is very obvious those involved do not care. Very sad indeed.


  You can find the original News-Ledger editorial here.

  You may comment on this or other local issues by sending a ‘letter to the editor’ to us by email (call 916-371-8030 for email address).

  Or, by mail to:
  News-Ledger, P.O. Box 463, West Sacramento, CA 95691.
  Either way, please include your real name (for publication) and your address and phone number (not for publication).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Drop off your documents & e-waste to help RCHS music program


Support the River City High School music department by bringing your old electronic items and your old documents to an e-waste and shredding fundraiser from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. tomorrow (Saturday, Jan. 12) in the music building parking lot, west side of campus. Bring your old phones, hard drives, monitors, etc. You may also bring documents to be shredded — $5 for a tall kitchen bag full, or $10 per 11” X 18” box. Shredding is done at the time of drop-off. Drive-through, and someone will take your items from your car.

  For information, call 375-7800 or email amarvelli@wusd.k12.ca.us.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Bits & pieces from around Yolo County:


Some of the goings-on around Yolo County in recent weeks:

  The Yolo County Children’s Alliance announced it had received a $45,000 grant from United Way Capitol Region.
The money is intended to fund participation in the United Way STAR Readers project for 80 local kids in kindergarten through third grade. The program will be run by the Childrens Alliance at Westfield Village Elementary School. It’s intended to help kids learn to read.


Blue Shield of California Foundation gave $35,000 to the Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Center (SADVC) in Yolo County. The money is intended to help the center “provide services and assist survivors of domestic violence in Yolo County,” said a press release from the SADVC.


The Delta Elementary Charter School in Clarksburg purchased a new 82-passenger bus to transport students from the region – including West Sacramento.
The school traded its old bus for a new one arranged by a program of the Yolo Solano Air Management District, as part of an air quality improvement program. The new bus is scheduled to start service this month.

The animal services division of the Yolo County Sheriff’s office in Woodland received a face-lift in late October, thanks to outside help.
Brooks Painting of Davis and a $10,000 grant from “National Make a Difference Day” paid for the sprucing up. Volunteers helped paint the cinderblock building and its “puppy park.”

About 450 people attended the “Art Farm” hosted by YoloArts in November, with buyers picking up at least 55 fine-art paintings and sculptures. The event in Woodland’s Gallery 625 (the county administration building at 625 Court Street) raised an estimated $15,000 for distribution to the “Art and Ag Project” and partners Yolo Land Trust and Yolo Farm to Fork.
It’s an annual event.

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledge newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013