Tag Archives: west sacramento news

Air Force JROTC starts up at River City High School

NEWS-LEDGER NEWSPAPER — AUG 28, 2013 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

A military officer prep program has returned to West Sacramento’s main high school after an absence of many years.

This time, it’s the Air Force which is on the River City High School campus for its “JROTC,” or Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps. Principal Katie Nemer says the program is being held in three class-loads. And it’s popular.

KATIE NEMER Principal at RCHS in West Sacramento (WUSD website photo)

KATIE NEMER
Principal at RCHS in West Sacramento
(WUSD website photo)

“We have about 110 signed up,” said Nemer. “We actually have a waiting list of about 45 kids. It’s a year-long class – it teaches military history, avionics, national security – everything you could think of to prepare for a career in the military.”

“But,” added Nemer, “the purpose is not necessarily for them to join the military, it’s to learn what they need to know to become good members of the community.”

The coursework is led by Air Force Colonel Russell Warner and an enlisted Air Force enlisted man. In an email, Warner echoed Nemer’s comment, saying the JROTC program’s mission  is to “develop citizens of character dedicated to serving their nation and community.”

For some students in the new program, JROTC may be a path towards officer status in the Air Force. But for how many?

“It’s too early to tell that,” Nemer told the News-Ledger. “Many think they will go into the military. But that’s not our purpose. The purpose is to provide what they need to become excellent citizens.”

The year-long coursework is heavy on physical conditioning. Participating freshmen get physical education credit; higher-level students get “elective” credit for the JROTC class.

Principal Nemer said nobody has protested the involvement of a military program on campus.

“It’s just the opposite,” she commented. “I can’t tell you how many people have been saying, ‘Thank you, thank you, thank you!’”

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

 

Native plants bring native pollinators: the right plants bring butterflies in Yolo

Anise Swallowtail Butterfly, photo courtesy of Mieko Watkins of Tuleyome. (Click to enlarge)

Anise Swallowtail Butterfly, photo courtesy of Mieko Watkins of Tuleyome. (Click to enlarge)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 28, 2013 —

By Nancy Bauer
Tuleyome Association

My native habitat gardening journey started almost 20 years ago, right after viewing a slide show presentation by two passionate butterfly gardeners. The magic of those butterfly gardens resurrected memories of a favorite childhood garden— a glorious tangle of fragrant flowers, hanging vines, and sweet purple grapes.  Growing wild next to the vegetable garden was a stand of milkweed that brought in Monarch butterflies in the late summer, and later fascinated me with fluffy seed heads that floated off in the wind.

Most everyone wants to see butterflies in the garden, but true pollinator habitat means planting for the butterfly caterpillars, too. The female butterfly lays her eggs on specific host plants and these are the only plants that caterpillar species can feed on.  They can be anything from trees and shrubs to grasses and other ground plants.  For some butterflies, like the Monarch, there is only one host plant—milkweed.  With Monarch populations in serious decline we need to plant milkweed, especially along the Monarch’s migratory route.  (In northern California, Monarchs migrate around September.)  There are various native milkweeds to choose from including narrowleaf milkweed and showy milkweed.

In the Sacramento area, the once common West Coast Lady and Anise Swallowtail butterflies are now much harder to find.  The West Coast Ladies and Painted Ladies use lupines and members of the mallow family, such as checkerbloom, desert or bush mallow, and cheeseweed for their host plants. The black and yellow Anise Swallowtail uses members of the carrot family (umbellifers).  Avoid non-native invasive wild fennel, and stick with lovage, angelica, bronze fennel, culinary fennels, parsley, or dill to attract this butterfly to your garden.  The Western Tiger Swallowtail is also frequent visitor and use willows as host plants.  Another common garden butterfly in our region, the Buckeye, uses snapdragons and their relatives as hosts.  If you find black caterpillars on your snapdragons, you may be hosting Buckeye butterflies.  Be sure to plant enough to share!

Where the orange-and-black Monarch butterfly comes from: this caterpillar. Photo courtesy of Mary Hanson, Tuleyome. (Click to enlarge)

Where the orange-and-black Monarch butterfly comes from: this caterpillar. Photo courtesy of Mary Hanson, Tuleyome. (Click to enlarge)

If you want to find out which butterflies hang out in your neighborhood, plant a butterfly bush and buy a good butterfly guide.  When you have identified the butterflies, plant their caterpillar food plants.  The huge aster-sunflower family provides us with many good butterfly nectar plants, and they offer a broad landing platform. Be sure to plant your nectar flowers in drifts of just one species, which is much more attractive to butterflies and other pollinators than if you plant many different nectar flowers, but only one of each kind. The key to creating habitat for butterflies and other pollinators is to grow a diversity of good nectar plants that bloom in different seasons.  Put your butterfly host plants near nectar plants but in the more “wild” parts of the garden where there is less activity and foot traffic.  Be an informal (and organic) gardener.  Be less eager to prune and clean up:  butterfly chrysalides could be hiding most anywhere in the garden

The first butterflies to arrive in my garden nectar on my native sages which bloom early in spring.  In late spring and summer, they have moved to the buddleias, verbenas, and scabiosa, and in the fall, they nectar on asters, Michelmas daisies and Mexican sunflowers (which is a favorite of Monarch butterflies).  This year, I was thrilled to see pipevine swallowtails and their caterpillars on the Dutchman’s pipe; and because I grow coffeeberry, creambush, willow and ceanothus, I frequently see Pale Swallowtails, Spring Azures, and Lorquin’s Admirals in my garden. Plant for butterflies.  They will come.

  Nancy Bauer is a wildlife habitat gardener in Sonoma County, and is the author of “The California Wildlife Habitat Garden” (UC Press, 2012, ISBN 0520267818).  Photos by Mieko Watkins and Mary K. Hanson; used with permission.  Tuleyome Tales is a monthly publication of Tuleyome, a conservation organization with offices in Woodland and Napa, California. For more information go online to www.tuleyome.org.

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

 

Basic computers: a class for seniors Tuesday in West Sacramento

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

A “computer basics for seniors” class is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Tuesday, Sept, 3, at the local library, 1212 Merkley Avenue. Pre-registration, library card and library PIN are required. Visit the library to sign up.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

More business news from West Sac

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 28, 2013 —

Festivities around the opening of the Japan-based Nippon Shokken food seasonings plant in Southport weren’t the only thing in West Sacramento business news this month.

According to various media reports:

—  Petco opened one of two new Sacramento-area stores on Aug. 19 near Ikea in West Sacramento. The pet-supply store operates from 11,500 square feet in the RiverPoint Marketplace, near Reed Avenue and I-80.  And:

—  A Norway-based French fry processing firm announced plans to build a 60,000-square foot facility on Embarcadero Drive in the Riverside Commerce Center of West Sacramento, also near I-80 and Reed Avenue.

TOMRA Sorting USA hopes to open in March, with a 12-year lease from Harsch Investment Properties. West Sacramento’s Brown Construction Inc. is the builder in this build-to-suit deal. TOMRA expects to expand from about 45 to 70 employees upon this expansion.

—  Yolo County’s landfill recently announced a program designed to save local farmers money – an estimated $45,000 annually for every thousand acres farmed, reports county spokeswoman Beth Gabor.

Instead of disposing of plastic ag waste by paying fees to drop it in the landfill, farmers have a new option. The county has partnered with Encore Farming Solutions to create a recycling program. Items such as irrigation drip tape, almond film plastic, mulch film plastic, greenhouse plastic and strawberry fumigation tarp can now be recycled into plastic bags, at no cost to the farmer.  The farms do have to roll or bale the material before it goes to Encore.

For more information, ag firms may call Yolo County Recycling Coordinator Pamela Hedrick at (530) 666-8856, or email her at phedrick@yolocounty.org.

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

Free ‘Harry Potter’ film fest starts Saturday at West Sacramento library

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER NEWSPAPER OF WEST SACRAMENTO —

You can watch every “Harry Potter” movie for free – and fortunately, you don’t have to do it all in one sitting. Viewings are planned at 2 p.m. on Saturdays, September 7, 14, 21 and 28, and Oct. 5, 12, 19 & 26, in the library at 1212 Merkley Avenue. Enter through Platform 9 ¾.

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Copyright News-Ledger 2013

 

Japanese factory starts up in Southport

Flanked by company mascots at the Southport grand opening are, left to right: Tetsuya Ozawa, president of Nihon Shokken Holdings Co., Ltd. (parent company of Nippon Shokken USA; Nippon Shokken chairman Kazuhiko Ozawa; and West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon (photo by the News-Ledger)

Flanked by company mascots at the Southport grand opening are, left to right: Tetsuya Ozawa, president of Nihon Shokken Holdings Co., Ltd. (parent company of Nippon Shokken USA; Nippon Shokken chairman Kazuhiko Ozawa; and West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon (photo by the News-Ledger)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 28, 2013 —

A handful of West Sacramento officials joined dozens of Japanese employees of the Nippon Shokken company on Monday for the festive grand opening of the Japanese-blend food seasoning plant at 2970 Ramco Street, near Southport Parkway.

The plant is meant to help serve the company’s American market. It will employ up to about 400 people, say city officials.

Attendees were invited to tour the new plant after the ceremonial ribbon-cutting. Media were invited to a press conference, but not to the tour of the production facilities.

 

  Do you like what you see here?

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  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2013

 

 

Update on West Sac street work: some old gas pipes are ‘pre-1955’

NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 28, 2013 —

Last week, the News-Ledger reported on streetwork in West Sacramento that just got underway as PG&E starts replacing old gas pipes in the city. The work is scheduled for the West Capitol Avenue area, as well as portions of Westacre Road, Jefferson Boulevard and 15th Street. It’s scheduled to cause some traffic impacts until it’s done around late November.

Since publishing that article, the News-Ledger has received some additional answers from PG&E spokeswoman Jana Morris.

“We will be replacing 3.19 miles of 16-inch steel transmission line,” she said by email. “Letters have been sent to customers within 2,500 feet of the work location, notifying them of our plans.”

Just how old are the “old” pipes?

“The pipe ranges in age – it dates to pre-1955 pipe,” said Morris.

The utility company plans to vent and clear the pipe, tentatively, on Oct. 13.

Morris corrected the News-Ledger’s earlier report that had said “few” disruptions in gas service were expected.

“Just to be clear, we do not anticipate disruptions to service.”

Copyright News-Ledger 2013