Tag Archives: west sacramento newspaper

Southport bike/walk trail now open

 At the trail’s ribbon cutting, left to right: former Yolo County Supervisor Mike McGowan; Urban Forest Manager Dena Kirtley; City Councilmember Chris Ledesma; Chamber of Commerce Board Chair Marty Swingle; City Councilmember Oscar Villegas; (behind Mr. Villegas) SACOG Executive Director Mike McKeever; Mayor Christopher Cabaldon; (behind Mayor Cabaldon) Terry Preston, WalkSacramento; Mayor Pro Tem Mark Johannessen; (behind Mayor Pro Tem Johannessen) Jim Brown, Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates; City Manager Martin Tuttle; Chamber Executive Director Denice Seals; and Project Manager Vin Cay.   (City spokesman Art Schroeder contributed the photo and  information to this report)

At the trail’s ribbon cutting, left to right: former Yolo County Supervisor Mike McGowan; Urban Forest Manager Dena Kirtley; City Councilmember Chris Ledesma; Chamber of Commerce Board Chair Marty Swingle; City Councilmember Oscar Villegas; (behind Mr. Villegas) SACOG Executive Director Mike McKeever; Mayor Christopher Cabaldon; (behind Mayor Cabaldon) Terry Preston, WalkSacramento; Mayor Pro Tem Mark Johannessen; (behind Mayor Pro Tem Johannessen) Jim Brown, Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates; City Manager Martin Tuttle; Chamber Executive Director Denice Seals; and Project Manager Vin Cay.
(City spokesman Art Schroeder contributed the photo and information to this report)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — FEB 5, 2014 —

NORTH-SOUTH TRAIL CONNECTS SOUTHPORT FROM HIGH SCHOOL TO BARGE CANAL

West Sacramento officials and community members performed a “ribbon cutting” to celebrate the opening of the new Clarksburg Branch Line Trail in Southport on Friday morning.

The 1.25-mile trail for bikes and pedestrians is built on a stretch of the former Yolo Short Line Railroad tracks. It runs from near Target and River City High School northward to South River Road, where a new bridge is now under construction along the barge canal.

The “rails to trails” project is part of the city’s master plan for bicycle and pedestrian links. You can view a map of the full master plan on our website here.

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014

 

Fireworks booths for nonprofits, churches

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —

Is your nonprofit or church interested in raising money by operating a fireworks booth during the 2014 Fourth of July season?

Come to an informational meeting on Thursday, Feb. 27, at 6 p.m. at city hall (1110 West Capitol Avenue). Learn about the lottery used to select winning groups, and the process of selling fireworks with help from one of the licensed commercial vendors. For more information, call the city clerk’s office, 617-4500.
Copyright News-Ledger 2014

‘Serpentine soil’ is a pretty special habitat

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JAN 29, 2014 —

By Mary K. Hanson
Tuleyome Association

“Serpentine Soil”: when talking about the various habitats under consideration for a National Conservation Area designation in the Berryessa Snow Mountain region, that term comes up a lot.  For most people, though, it’s rather meaningless. Most of us, after all, aren’t geologists or botanists, and if we’ve ever had an encounter with serpentine soil we probably didn’t even realize it.  The truth is, though, if you live in the Coast Ranges of California just about anywhere between Santa Barbara County and the Oregon border (or in the Sierra foothills) you’re living in a region rich in serpentine outcroppings.

Some plants have adapted the challenging structure of ‘serpentine soil’ (courtesy photo)

Some plants have adapted the challenging structure of ‘serpentine soil’ (courtesy photo)

So what is “serpentine soil”?  Simply speaking, if you think of the Earth as an onion made up of several different layers surrounding a molten core, we live on the very outer layer, on top of the soil that is a thin skin on the Earth’s crust and on our layer the soil is for the most part full of nutrients and organic matter which allow a lot of plants and trees to thrive.  Below us is another layer called the mantle.  This layer is made of more dense, pressure resistant, 4-billion year old “ultramafic” minerals and rocks that are low in plant-nurturing calcium, potassium and other minerals, and high in things like magnesium, nickel and cobalt.  When through tectonic action, veins or plugs or whole sheets of this mantle layer are thrust up to the surface, they come in contact with water, metamorphose and become “serpentinized” (converted into serpentine).  And when these serpentinized outcroppings breakdown and mix with organic matter they form what is called “serpentine soil.”

You’ve probably seen expanses of serpentine soil and didn’t realize it. Like scrubby islands in a sea of green, they look misplaced, almost “unearthly” – barren, rocky, and sparsely vegetated by only occasional large trees and plants with few or very hardy leaves designed to reflect sunlight.   And you may ask yourself, why should we care about this place?  It’s kind of ugly.  But what’s really exciting about these serpentine expanses is that within their boundaries you can readily view examples of plant adaptation, natural selection, and species differentiation at work.  Many of the plants and trees that can grow in serpentine soil are specialized and unique, not found anywhere else.  In fact, about 280 of these serpentine species are listed as “rare” by the California Native Plant Society.  Where the serpentine soils are, so are floral treasures not found in any other ecosystem… and they’re here right in your backyard!

This year is the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act, and to celebrate that you might try walking through some of the local wilderness areas, like Cedar Roughs which is rich in serpentine soil and holds the largest stand of Sargent Cypress trees in California.  Other serpentine areas include Walker Ridge, the public lands of the Bureau of Land Management Knoxville Unit (located north of Lake Berryessa, part of which is designated an Area of Critical Environmental Concern because of the rich serpentine flora) and throughout the Putah and Cache Creek areas.

The Bare Monkey Flower is an example of a plant species endemic to serpentine.  With its “pouty-lipped” yellow flowers and feather-like leaves, it is found only in Lake and Napa County.  You may also find about twelve different species within the mustard family that grow in serpentine, including the Most Beautiful Jewelflower which grows in both Yolo and Solano Counties.  The best time to see these specialized plants in bloom are between late February and early June.

Also, even though serpentine areas looked “unusable” or “uninhabitable”, they are not.  To geologists they offer a unique opportunity to see and analyze rocks and minerals from deep within the earth’s mantle, and for the rest of us they are a cache of wholly unique, highly-adaptable and rare plants just sitting out there waiting for us to view them on hikes and photo-outings.

For more information about serpentine soils, check out “California Serpentines” by Arthur R. Kruckeberg and “An Introduction to the Serpentine Plant Community of the Putah-Cache Bioregion” by author Kelly G. Lyons.  There’s also “Serpentine: Evolution and Ecology of a Model System” by Susan Harrison and Nishanta Rajakaruna.

  Tuleyome Tales is a monthly publication of Tuleyome, a nonprofit conservation organization based in Woodland, CA. For more information about Tuleyome go to www.tuleyome.org.  Mary K. Hanson is an amateur naturalist and photographer. 

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Assisted living complex proposed for Jefferson Boulevard in Southport

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — JAN 29, 2014 —

A 178-unit assisted living complex is proposed for the northwest corner of Jefferson Boulevard and Gateway Drive in Southport.

“Summerplace Living at Westgate” hopes to place up to 205 residents in a combination of 94 “assisted living” units and 84 “memory care” units at 2305 Jefferson Boulevard. The 5.33-acre, two-story development would be bounded by Jefferson, Gateway and the Clarksburg Branch Line trail, along with existing homes.

It’s proposed by FCM Capital Partners of Roseville for most of a 6.72-acre parcel owned by Lighthouse Cove, LLC, of Bellevue, Washington.

The city planning commission will hold a public workshop on the project as part of its meeting on Thursday evening, Feb. 6, beginning at 6 p.m. at city hall.

 

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Copyright News-Ledger 2014