Tag Archives: West Sacramento

Father/daughter community dance


Fathers and daughters of all ages are invited to a “Night of Enchantment.”

Two dates for this “Masquerade Ball”: attend either Friday, Feb. 24 or Saturday, Feb. 25, from 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. This semi-formal “Night of Enchantment” comes with a dinner buffet, a DJ and dancing in the Galleria of the West Sacramento Civic Center, 1110 West Capitol Ave. Prom-style photos will be available for an additional fee.

Registration: fathers $35, daughter(s) $15 each, daughter(s) age 3 and younger are free. Registration is now open at the community center (1075 West Capitol Avenue) or the Recreation Center next to River City High School on Raider Lane. Deadline to register is Friday, Feb. 17.

For more information, call the Parks & Recreation Dept., (916) 617-4620.

Copyright News-Ledger

Nonprofits: interested in selling fireworks?


Is your non-profit organization interested in selling fireworks this season?  Come meet with City staff and fireworks wholesaler representatives to see if it’s right for your organization.  An informational workshop is scheduled for Tuesday, Feb. 21, at 6 p.m. at the city hall galleria, 1110 West Capitol Avenue.

Topics to be discussed:  the vendor lottery process, permit process, and the sales of fireworks.

The seller permit lottery filing period will be open from March 1-31.

For more information, contact West Sacramento City Clerk Kryss Rankin at (916) 617-4500.

Book drive for local teen center

Cindy Oseguera, Stacy Saelee, Laurence Herrmann, Kelly Yuen of the RCHS ‘Interact Club.’


The River City High School Interact Club is running a book drive for the W.S Collings Teen Center during the month of February.  The club is collecting new and used books for ages 13 to 18. You’re invited to drop off books at First Northern Bank (Harbor Blvd), Starbucks (Jefferson Blvd./Southport), or at the school.

Lowes will provide lumber as well and instruction on building book shelves at the teen center.

The Interact Clubs are sponsored by West Sacramento’s two Rotary clubs.

The RCHS Interact club this year has volunteered for the Sacramento Zoo Ice Cream Safari, the Veterans Day Parade, Eskaton, W.S. Recreation Center Halloween Carnival,  River Cats Winter Wonderland, and has helped WS Rotary/Abie Aware Crab Feed.

from Charyl Silva, Rotary Interact Adviser, and
Brandon Duff, teacher Adviser

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Copyright News-Ledger 2012


Wrestlers wind up with a win

The Raiders' Uriah Clark pins his El Dorado opponent for a win (photo by DE'ONNA JACK)

River City High School’s wrestling team held its last regular-season home match on Jan. 31, hosting the El Dorado Cougars. River City won, 48-32.

(Facebook members can find up-to-the-minute info on RCHS sports at contributor De’Onna Jack’s Facebook page. Click here.)

Copyright News-Ledger 2012


Fake debt collection scams reported

From the Yolo County District Attorney’s Office

Several alert older adults in Yolo County recently contacted the Yolo County District Attorney’s Elder Protection Unit to report phone calls from people pretending to be from a collection agency. In one instance the caller claimed to be an attorney and that over $800 dollars was owed for magazine subscriptions. Crooks can disguise the numbers they are really calling from using computers.

The scammers are hoping that you may be intimidated into providing personal information like a Social Security or Credit Card number to take care of the outstanding bill.  They then can use this information to commit Identity Theft and purchase items with your card.

  The District Attorney’s Office suggests that you always be suspicious when a call comes out of the blue asking for any of your personal information.  If someone claims to be calling from a collection agency about an old unpaid bill ask that they send you written confirmation with a copy of the original invoice for you to review and check against your records.  If it turns out to be a legitimate debt follow up to resolve the matter.

One of the main reasons to be alert when you receive a call from a debt collector is that it may be an indication that your identity was already stolen.  Scammers sometimes purchase items using your stolen account information.

For more information, contact Dave Edwards at (530) 666-8416.

Japanese factory breaks ground in Southport


A Japanese food plant breaks ground in Southport on Thursday.

Nippon Shokken is the “top producer of Japanese blend seasonings in the world,” according to a City of West Sacramento press release. Construction is expected to finish next January.
The company makes seasonings, sauces and tempura mix.

The plant would be its first manufacturing facility in the U.S. The company has bought 10 acres at 2970 Ramco Street for the 70,000-square foot plant, which it plans to open next year.

The factory is expected to produce 2,400 tons of product annually to begin with, and up to 5,000 tons per year maximum. It has been projected to employ over 100 people in the $16 million plant, according to reports from announcements made a year ago, when the site was selected.

The Japanese firm also expects to move its U.S.A. headquarters from Torrance to West Sacramento.

Nippon Shokken Chairman Kazuhiko Ozawa is expected to attend a ground-breaking at 10 a.m. on Feb. 9,  joined by Mayor Christopher Cabaldon and Yolo County Supervisor Mike McGowan.

Copyright News-Ledger 2012

Growing Yolo County’s ag industry

NEWS-LEDGER — FEB 1, 2012 —


Telling you that agriculture is important in Solano and Yolo counties is not news to any of us.  But if we told you that agriculture is the engine behind a $2.5 billion sector of our economies, you might be interested.  When we add that agriculture is our region’s brightest promise to increase jobs and prosperity, we know that we now have your full attention.

That’s exactly what happened when a study on this subject came out last year.  It got the attention of farmers, processors, bankers, government and academia.  They all wanted to know how they could be a part of growing this broad, yet integrated sector known as the food chain industry cluster, which makes up 10 percent of our shared economy.  That interest resulted in a tremendous turnout for the Solano and Yolo Counties Joint Economic Summit in December.

  “The Food Chain Cluster: Integrating the Food Chain in Solano and Yolo Counties to Create Economic Opportunities and Jobs” report describes the food chain as the full spectrum of economic activity related to agriculture – from seed to the table – from before the crops get into the fields, to the goods and services used in farming, to the value-added processing that converts crops into consumer goods.

The report highlights some opportunities and challenges to adding more value to agriculture.  The opportunities range from increasing demand for high-value products that we grow, such as almonds and walnuts, to the fact that seven out of the top 10 seed producers in the world are located here. While having established food processing facilities is one of our strengths, the need for additional slaughtering facilities and other essential processors was identified as a weakness. Regulatory issues, costs of operations and the lack of a chilling capacity are some of the other challenges to overcome.

The purpose of the summit was to engage participants in building strategies that will preserve, promote and expand our agricultural industry and all of the value it brings to our communities. A key message we heard was the need for the urban public, the business community and economic development staffs to have a better understanding of the importance of bringing processing facilities to the region. This will bring growers much-needed contracts for their commodities – an economic incentive to keep agricultural production local.  New processing facilities will also generate a wave of other job-producing companies that will spur retail purchases, home sales and other positive drivers for our local economy.

The summit reinforced this region’s capacity to continue to grow our food chain cluster. One speaker suggested we could make our Agricultural Valley the next Silicon Valley. For this to be possible, we need to capitalize on our competitive advantages – highly productive lands, plentiful water, top-notch research at the UC Davis, an entrepreneurial spirit, and an unwavering passion to preserve and promote agriculture.

In addition, the summit underscored how agriculture – farming and ranching – has evolved to remain competitive. Agriculture is more mechanized and less people-intensive than it once was. The vast majority of the jobs along the agriculture food chain – 77 percent – are in processing, distribution and support services. On average, the future growth in these sectors represents jobs paying around $24 per hour. These jobs will more than likely be in our cities, but some – in the best interests of both agriculture and the cities – will be located in unincorporated areas. Both counties have already set aside areas for this type of growth.

Summit participants discussed obstacles, such as ready access to capital and competing regulatory interests of federal, state and local governments. Overcoming these obstacles will require a new kind of collaboration. Bankers and government need to rethink their roles to become even better partners in growing the food chain.

In the coming weeks and months, you will see more results from this joint economic effort.  Our respective Boards of Supervisors received presentations on Jan. 24 on the basic road map of the most promising actions we can take together. You have our commitment to finding the funds for a public-private partnership for an agriculture ombudsman program to serve Solano and Yolo counties.  We need an ombudsman to help agriculture-related entrepreneurs turn their ideas into reality and create better partnerships between our businesses and regulators.
In many ways, what we have in front of us is an old-fashioned barn-raising. Our challenge is how each of us can commit to adding more value to agriculture. This cannot be about what the “other guy” should be doing. In a barn-raising, everybody pitches in because that’s what communities do to meet the need. Our communities are in need right now and agriculture is at the heart of the solution.

Supervisor, County of Solano

Supervisor, County of Yolo

Supervisor, County of Solano

Supervisor, County of Yolo