Tag Archives: yolo

Rabies threat: if you find a bat on the ground, step away and call Animal Services

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — SEPT 3, 2014 —

The Yolo County Sheriff’s Department warns members of the public not to touch any bats found on the ground. The department tells of one incident that took place early the afternoon of August 13 in Davis:

“A bat was found inside a tire swing at Davis Community Park, in the children’s playground behind the Davis Art Center. The bat then fell out of the tire swing onto the ground. Children were present and alerted an adult that there was a bat crawling on the ground. The bat was impounded by an Animal Services Officer and sent in for testing to the Solano, Napa & Yolo Public Health Laboratory to test for the rabies virus. Results determined the bat was positive for the virus.”

In 2013, adds Vicky Fletcher of the sheriff’s office, “there were numerous bats under the pedestrian overcrossing (at the park) that tested positive for rabies.”
“If you find a bat on the ground or in your residence,” said Fletcher in a press release, “do not attempt to handle the animal. Please contact Yolo County Sheriff’s Animal Services or your local law enforcement agency to have the animal removed.”

“Also, remember to vaccinate your pets for rabies,” she said.

If a person becomes sick with rabies, it’s generally fatal. But if a person exposed to rabies receives treatment before symptoms appear, the disease can usually be prevented.

For emergency calls only, contact the Yolo County Animal Services division at 911 or (530) 666-6612.

For non-emergency deputy response, call them at (530) 666-8282.

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Empower Yolo celebrates the ’50s with a fundraiser at Woodland venue

The unusual ‘Reiff’s Antique Gas Station Museum in Woodland boasts -- if you look closely, both an airplane and a car crashing into the walls, as well as a barber pole. Inside, there are antique soda vending machines and plenty of other Fifties flashbacks. (courtesy photo)

The unusual ‘Reiff’s Antique Gas Station Museum in Woodland boasts — if you look closely, both an airplane and a car crashing into the walls, as well as a barber pole. Inside, there are antique soda vending machines and plenty of other Fifties flashbacks. (courtesy photo)

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER —  SEPT 3, 2014 —

Empower Yolo, which provides violence-prevention and crisis intervention services to women and children in Yolo County, will host a party and fundraiser on Saturday, Sept. 20.

The “Rebels With a Cause: Driving Out Violence” event will be held at Reiff’s Antique Gas Station Museum, a Woodland landmark decorated with vintage 1950s memorabilia, antiques, and relics of classic car culture.

The end-of-the-summer soiree will feature “doo-wop” music, Motown and Fifties hits, a car show, a 1950s costume contest, silent auction and more.

The event starts at 4 p.m. on Sept. 20 at 52 Jefferson Street, Woodland. Buy tickets ($25) online at www.empoweryolo.org/rebels or at Empower Yolo, 175 Walnut Street in Woodland.  Ticket price includes the music, car show, drink ticket, hors d’oeuvres and a tour of the museum. Sponsorship opportunities available.

Empower Yolo is a nonprofit formerly known as the Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence Center.

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West Sac’s supervisor says this region played big role in shaping state water bond

NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 20, 2014 —

By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor

Yolo County Supervisor Oscar Villegas says this region played a big role in deciding what to keep and what to throw away as the upcoming $7.2 billion state water bond was drafted for the November ballot.  Villegas, who represents Clarksburg and most of West Sacramento, joined fellow Yolo supervisor Jim Provenza in a subcommittee that worked with other regional and state officials on the bond.

NEWS-LEDGER -- AUG 20, 2014 -- By Steve Marschke News-Ledger Editor   Yolo County Supervisor Oscar Villegas says this region played a big role in deciding what to keep and what to throw away as the upcoming $7.2 billion state water bond was drafted for the November ballot.  Villegas, who represents Clarksburg and most of West Sacramento, joined fellow Yolo supervisor Jim Provenza in a subcommittee that worked with other regional and state officials on the bond. OSCAR VILLEGAS, Yolo County Supervisor from West Sacramento (News-Ledger file photo)     OSCAR VILLEGAS,     Yolo County Supervisor from West Sacramento (News-Ledger file photo)   “Yolo County was intimately involved in the negotiations of what the bond ought to look like,” he told the News-Ledger on Monday. “We were representing Yolo County on a coalition of Delta counties. There are five counties actively involved in protecting the Delta.”   This coalition worked with state senators Darrell Steinberg and Lois Wolk and others officials involved in the process.   “There was a frenzy of activity in the last week as the deadline approached and there was a need to get something before the governor,” said Villegas.”   So what’s in the bond? What will voters be funding if they pass it?   “There’s a series of different things,” said Villegas. “The biggest is water storage, which I think everybody agrees is a huge need. It will (also) go for water recycling, groundwater cleanup, restoration in the Delta and for flood protection.”   Also important is what isn’t in it, said Villegas. He feels that the water bond, as drafted, will avoid funding the controversial “tunnels” project meant to ship water from the Delta area to Southern California.   “We did not want this bond to be used for that,” Villegas said. So the tunnel plan remains alive, but separate.   “The other thing we pushed for was funding for the Delta Conservancy,” he added. “This involves restoration work needed in the Delta, for the health of the Delta habitat as well as for the levees. Another thing I think is critical is that there is language included for agricultural sustainability. There is so much ag land in Yolo that is going to be affected by the redistribution of water. Bond funds could be used for ag sustainability.”   Villegas said he agrees with Senator Wolk’s view that the bill “is not perfect, but it’s a lot better than what we had.” And he recommends a “yes” vote on it in November, saying it will help the area’s farming, flood protection and water supply.   Do you like what you see here?   You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.   You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605). Copyright News-Ledger 2014

NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 20, 2014 —
By Steve Marschke
News-Ledger Editor
Yolo County Supervisor Oscar Villegas says this region played a big role in deciding what to keep and what to throw away as the upcoming $7.2 billion state water bond was drafted for the November ballot. Villegas, who represents Clarksburg and most of West Sacramento, joined fellow Yolo supervisor Jim Provenza in a subcommittee that worked with other regional and state officials on the bond.
OSCAR VILLEGAS, Yolo County Supervisor from West Sacramento (News-Ledger file photo)
OSCAR VILLEGAS,
Yolo County Supervisor from West Sacramento (News-Ledger file photo)
“Yolo County was intimately involved in the negotiations of what the bond ought to look like,” he told the News-Ledger on Monday. “We were representing Yolo County on a coalition of Delta counties. There are five counties actively involved in protecting the Delta.”
This coalition worked with state senators Darrell Steinberg and Lois Wolk and others officials involved in the process.
“There was a frenzy of activity in the last week as the deadline approached and there was a need to get something before the governor,” said Villegas.”
So what’s in the bond? What will voters be funding if they pass it?
“There’s a series of different things,” said Villegas. “The biggest is water storage, which I think everybody agrees is a huge need. It will (also) go for water recycling, groundwater cleanup, restoration in the Delta and for flood protection.”
Also important is what isn’t in it, said Villegas. He feels that the water bond, as drafted, will avoid funding the controversial “tunnels” project meant to ship water from the Delta area to Southern California.
“We did not want this bond to be used for that,” Villegas said. So the tunnel plan remains alive, but separate.
“The other thing we pushed for was funding for the Delta Conservancy,” he added. “This involves restoration work needed in the Delta, for the health of the Delta habitat as well as for the levees. Another thing I think is critical is that there is language included for agricultural sustainability. There is so much ag land in Yolo that is going to be affected by the redistribution of water. Bond funds could be used for ag sustainability.”
Villegas said he agrees with Senator Wolk’s view that the bill “is not perfect, but it’s a lot better than what we had.” And he recommends a “yes” vote on it in November, saying it will help the area’s farming, flood protection and water supply.
Do you like what you see here?
You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.
You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).
Copyright News-Ledger 2014

“Yolo County was intimately involved in the negotiations of what the bond ought to look like,” he told the News-Ledger on Monday. “We were representing Yolo County on a coalition of Delta counties. There are five counties actively involved in protecting the Delta.”

This coalition worked with state senators Darrell Steinberg and Lois Wolk and others officials involved in the process.

“There was a frenzy of activity in the last week as the deadline approached and there was a need to get something before the governor,” said Villegas.”

So what’s in the bond? What will voters be funding if they pass it?

“There’s a series of different things,” said Villegas. “The biggest is water storage, which I think everybody agrees is a huge need. It will (also) go for water recycling, groundwater cleanup, restoration in the Delta and for flood protection.”

Also important is what isn’t in it, said Villegas. He feels that the water bond, as drafted, will avoid funding the controversial “tunnels” project meant to ship water from the Delta area to Southern California.

“We did not want this bond to be used for that,” Villegas said. So the tunnel plan remains alive, but separate.

“The other thing we pushed for was funding for the Delta Conservancy,” he added. “This involves restoration work needed in the Delta, for the health of the Delta habitat as well as for the levees. Another thing I think is critical is that there is language included for agricultural sustainability. There is so much ag land in Yolo that is going to be affected by the redistribution of water. Bond funds could be used for ag sustainability.”

Villegas said he agrees with Senator Wolk’s view that the bill “is not perfect, but it’s a lot better than what we had.” And he recommends a “yes” vote on it in November, saying it will help the area’s farming, flood protection and water supply.

  Do you like what you see here?

  You can support local journalism, support this website, and see all the News-Ledger’s articles every week! Subscribe to the News-Ledger newspaper. It’s only $20 per year within West Sacramento – once a week, delivered to your mailbox.

  You can even try it for free for two months if you live in West Sacramento. Just send your name and mailing address to FreeTrial@news-ledger.com (offer open to new subscribers in West Sacramento ZIP codes 95691 & 95605).

Copyright News-Ledger 2014

Human remains found near West Sac

FROM THE NEWS-LEDGER — AUG 20, 2014 —

The Yolo County Sheriff’s Department is looking into the discovery of some possible human remains Friday morning (Aug. 15) along the muddy riverfront of the Sacramento River near County Road 127.

A citizen noticed the teeth and a few other small bones in the area north of West Sacramento at about 11 a.m.

A sheriff’s department boat and coroner’s office investigators responded.

Further information was not immediately available.

Copyright News-Ledger 2014